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Leadership - 2. The Law of Influence

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#1
GoldenEagle

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****Please note this is not the OP/Subject just the introduction****



I’m going to start a series about Leadership on WCF and how it applies to Christians today. My hope is to encourage others to grow and mature in their walk with the Lord. I also would like to see people reach their full potential in leadership in reaching those around them for Christ and making disciples in fullfilling the Great Commission.


Here's what we've discussed and looked at from a Scriptural perspective so far:


Leadership - 1. Law of the Lid


Leadership - 2. The Law of Influence


Leadership - 3. The Law of Process



Leadership - 4. The Law of the Navigation


God bless,
GE


------------------------------------



*****This is the OP and subject to this thread below*****


Leadership - 2. The Law of Influence

The True Measure of Leadership is Influence – Nothing More, Nothing Less.

There is positional leadership. In the military leaders use rank and if all else fails throw people into the brig. In business, bosses have tremendous leverage in the form of salary, benefits, hours, perks. In voluntary organizations, such as churches, the only thing that works is leadership in its purest form. Leaders have only the influence given by God to aid them.

If you are a businessperson and you really want to find out whether your people are capable of leading, send them out to volunteer their time in the community. If they can get people to follow them while their serving say at Red Cross, or a United Way shelter, their local church, they you know they really understand influence.

Example: Abraham Lincoln
One of my favorite stories is that of Abraham Lincoln. He went from captain to private to commander in chief. In 1932, years before he became president, young Lincoln gather men together to fight in the Black Hawk War. The person who put the volunteer company together for the militia often became the leader and assumed a commanding rank. Lincoln was given the rank of captain.

Lincoln had a problem though that he knew nothing about soldiering. He also had no prior military experience and knew nothing about tactics. There’s the story that one day Lincoln was marching a couple dozen men across a field and needed to guide them through a gate. Lincoln recalled “I could not for the life of me remember the proper word of command for getting my company endwise. Finally, as we came near {the gate} I shouted: ‘This company is dismissed for two minutes, when it will fall in again on the other side of the gate.”

As time went on Lincoln’s influence with his men actually decreased. Lincoln began with the title of captain. By the end of his military service, Abraham Lincoln found his rightful place having achieved the rank of private.

Fortunately, Lincoln overcame his inability to influence others. Despite his early military circumstances God used Lincoln tremendously. So much so that he was key in passing the 13th Amendment to the Constitution that ended slavery in the U.S. that was passed by Congress on April 8, 1864.

Here’s an interesting saying: “He who thinks he leads, but has no followers, is only taking a walk.”

Thoughts? What are some examples of influence in the Bible both from a positive and negative standpoint? (Hint: Rahab, Joshua, Samuel, David, etc.)

God bless,
GE


Assume I'm using this source for all my posts on this thread: Leadership material from John C. Maxwell.

#2
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I'll start out with an example...

A. The Law of Influence: God used Rahab

Joshua 2:1-21

The Story of Rahab proves that God will use anybody. This woman worked as a prostitute in Jericho as the Israelites approached the city, there seemed little logical reason why Rahab should have been considered for the role:

1. She occupied no position and held no official title in the city.
2. The Israelites probably looked at women as lower class citizens back then.
3. As a prostitute, she held an even lower social rank than the average woman.

But because leadership depends less on titles than it does on influence given by God, God chose Rahab. She helped the spies by her quick wit, gutsy style, and clever plan . By doing so she saved not her own life, but added to accomplishing the purposes in Jericho. Rahab even occupies an honored place in the hall of faith in Hebrews (Heb. 11:31).

Thoughts?

God bless,
GE


Source: Leadership material from John C. Maxwell.



#3
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An example of poor leadership.

The wealthy man Nabal denied provisions for the army of God’s beloved David which had protected his livestock assets. The men of Nabal’s household were saved from death only because of the intervention of his wife Abigail. ( Another wise woman in the bible ) Nabal's poor leadership almost needlessly cost lives of people who served him.

Nabal acted selfishly and without good judgment or wisdom. He also did not give thanks to God for his many blessings.
1 Samuel 25.

Unselfishness, good judgment, and wisdom are vital leadership qualities.

Also ! If Nabal was a good leader he would accept the wise counsel of others which it appears was not his habit.

Edited by ninhao, 01 December 2012 - 08:44 PM.


#4
Jayyycuuup

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I'm not sure I am on base with this. . . . But I will Give it a try.

God Uses David !

The Story of David and Goliath is Found in the First book of Samuel. (17) David was just a youth, the youngest of his three brothers. He was an armourbearer for Saul , untrained in War and was destined to defeat a man of war from youth. His weapon of choice was 5 smooth stones, a sling and the guidance of God.

1) David was just a young man, untrained, but held the Might of God in high esteem, confident in the Lords protection for Him. Knowing that he would be delivered before Goliath. Something interesting is that he says, "I come before you in the name of the Lord of Hosts." Then we look at John 14:13 "And whatever you ask in My name, that I will do, that the Father may be glorified in the Son" That same promise is presented; David came before the philistines in the name of the Lord; so that He may glorify His name. And it was done!!!

2) David was merely looked upon as a young child, most of all mocked for his "lack of wisdom in war" and coming before them with a stick. Little did they know just what he really came with !

3)David was of no real big name, just a young man representing God; being guided by Him in every way. He walked by faith; to me this not only represents the uniqueness of God's choice but it gives a true meaning to Gods dedication and love for us ! How far faith and favor can really go!

#5
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An example of poor leadership.

The wealthy man Nabal denied provisions for the army of God’s beloved David which had protected his livestock assets. The men of Nabal’s household were saved from death only because of the intervention of his wife Abigail. ( Another wise woman in the bible ) Nabal's poor leadership almost needlessly cost lives of people who served him.

Nabal acted selfishly and without good judgment or wisdom. He also did not give thanks to God for his many blessings.
1 Samuel 25.

Unselfishness, good judgment, and wisdom are vital leadership qualities.

Also ! If Nabal was a good leader he would accept the wise counsel of others which it appears was not his habit.


Excellent Ninhao! I agree with what you've posted.


B. The Law of Influence: God used Abigail

Abigail is one of my favorite characters of the BIble. God had a plan for her life. God blessed her immensely and she helped with God's guidance David avoid a massacre. Her rare courage, common sense, and fabulous relational skills all contributed to her single-handedly saving her family.

On the other hand Nabal provoked the slaughter of his whole household. His name meant "fool" and he lived up to it. A man without discernment, he selfishly refused to provide for David and his men. Except for Abigail...

Lessons from Abigail:

1. Risky initiative: Abigail took the first step with David to resolve a sticky situation.
2. Emotional security: Abigail demonstrated inward security in her identity.
3. Genuine humility: Abigail submitted to David by falling at his feet and seeking his favor.
4. Personal responsibility: Abigail took responsibility for Nabal and explained his wicked behavior.
5. Selfless attitude: Abigail focused completely on David's welfare and future success.
6. Generous spirit: Abigail gave David ad his men a choice gift for their journey.
7. Forthright approach: Abigail directly asked David to forgive Nabal. She was a peacemaker.
8. Quick wit: Abigail suggested David didn't want a slaughter on his conscious.
9. Eternal perspective: Abigail saw David and their relationship from a divine viewpoint. She wanted him to succeed.
10. Kind affirmation: Abigail sought David's benefit and gave him encouraging words.

Stuff Good Relationships are Made Of...

A. Have a Leader's Head: Be a Risk Taker and Understand People
Abigail when she found out of her husband's folly set it upon herself to be a peacemaker. She did not live in fear but faced the challenge head on. Abigail understood how to appeal to David in order to accomplish her goal of saving her people from the sword. She understood that generosity (200 loaves of bread, 2 win skins, five sheep, one hundred clusters of raisins, etc.) breeds generosity. She also understood that David didn't want to kill Nabal and her household out of revenge.

B. Have a Leader's Heart: Love God Love People
Abigail was wise as she had an eternal perspective regarding David's actions. Abigail assumed the role of a servant, submitting to both David and her husband. She felt secure enough to serve.

C. Have a Leader's Hand: Help People
Abigail gave David and his men what they needed (supplies and honor). She added value to him and thereby saved her life and that of her family.


What do you think? Agree/Disagree? Something to add? More thoughts on Nabal in the next post.

God bless,
GE


Source: Leadership material from John C. Maxwell.

#6
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An example of poor leadership.

The wealthy man Nabal denied provisions for the army of God’s beloved David which had protected his livestock assets. The men of Nabal’s household were saved from death only because of the intervention of his wife Abigail. ( Another wise woman in the bible ) Nabal's poor leadership almost needlessly cost lives of people who served him.

Nabal acted selfishly and without good judgment or wisdom. He also did not give thanks to God for his many blessings.
1 Samuel 25.

Unselfishness, good judgment, and wisdom are vital leadership qualities.

Also ! If Nabal was a good leader he would accept the wise counsel of others which it appears was not his habit.


C. The Law of Influence: Nabal's Failure

Why Did Nabal Fail?

1. Nabal grew wealthy and satisfied and didn't think he needed to build relationships. (vs. 2)
2. Nabal became selfish and distrustful of others; he couldn't overcome his evil temperament. (vs. 3)
3. Nabla neither gave nor received encouragement; he had grown numb to positive attitudes. (vs. 6)
4. Nabal forgot how others had blessed him in the past; he counted only his losses. (vs. 7, 8)
5. Nabal belittled people and forgot their names; his insecruity prevented his generosity. (vs. 10)
6. Nabal saw no reason to help others; he suffered from self-centered motives. (vs. 11)
7. Nabal wanted to build only his own "kingdom," not God's (vs. 11)

Four Word Pictures...
What could Nabal have done to improve his relational skills? HE could have stated by embracing the following pictures:

1. The Host
Just as a host takes innitiative and makes a guest feel comfortable in his or her home, so are we to host the relationships God gives us in our loves.

2. The Doctor
Just as doctor does not give a prescription before first making a diagnosis, we are to poke and prod others with questions, so that our responses match the relevant need.

3. The Counselor
A good counselor actively listens. Since the number one emotional need (the number 1 spiritual need is salvation through Jesus Christ) of people today is the need to be understood, we must deepen our listening skills.

4. The Tour Guide
You hire a tour guide to help you reach your planned destination. God wants us to serve as spiritual "tour guides" for others, helping them to reach their full potential in Christ.

Thoughts? Agree/disagree? Something to add?

God bless,
GE


Source: Leadership material from John C. Maxwell.

#7
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An example of poor leadership.

The wealthy man Nabal denied provisions for the army of God’s beloved David which had protected his livestock assets. The men of Nabal’s household were saved from death only because of the intervention of his wife Abigail. ( Another wise woman in the bible ) Nabal's poor leadership almost needlessly cost lives of people who served him.

Nabal acted selfishly and without good judgment or wisdom. He also did not give thanks to God for his many blessings.
1 Samuel 25.

Unselfishness, good judgment, and wisdom are vital leadership qualities.

Also ! If Nabal was a good leader he would accept the wise counsel of others which it appears was not his habit.


Excellent Ninhao! I agree with what you've posted.

Abigail is one of my favorite characters of the BIble. God had a plan for her life. God blessed her immensely and she helped with God's guidance David avoid a massacre. Her rare courage, common sense, and fabulous relational skills all contributed to her single-handedly saving her family.

On the other hand Nabal provoked the slaughter of his whole household. His name meant "fool" and he lived up to it. A man without discernment, he selfishly refused to provide for David and his men. Except for Abigail...

Lessons from Abigail:

1. Risky initiative: Abigail took the first step with David to resolve a sticky situation.
2. Emotional security: Abigail demonstrated inward security in her identity.
3. Genuine humility: Abigail submitted to David by falling at his feet and seeking his favor.
4. Personal responsibility: Abigail took responsibility for Nabal and explained his wicked behavior.
5. Selfless attitude: Abigail focused completely on David's welfare and future success.
6. Generous spirit: Abigail gave David ad his men a choice gift for their journey.
7. Forthright approach: Abigail directly asked David to forgive Nabal. She was a peacemaker.
8. Quick wit: Abigail suggested David didn't want a slaughter on his conscious.
9. Eternal perspective: Abigail saw David and their relationship from a divine viewpoint. She wanted him to succeed.
10. Kind affirmation: Abigail sought David's benefit and gave him encouraging words.

Stuff Good Relationships are Made Of...

A. Have a Leader's Head: Be a Risk Taker and Understand People
Abigail when she found out of her husband's folly set it upon herself to be a peacemaker. She did not live in fear but faced the challenge head on. Abigail understood how to appeal to David in order to accomplish her goal of saving her people from the sword. She understood that generosity (200 loaves of bread, 2 win skins, five sheep, one hundred clusters of raisins, etc.) breeds generosity. She also understood that David didn't want to kill Nabal and her household out of revenge.

B. Have a Leader's Heart: Love God Love People
Abigail was wise as she had an eternal perspective regarding David's actions. Abigail assumed the role of a servant, submitting to both David and her husband. She felt secure enough to serve.

C. Have a Leader's Hand: Help People
Abigail gave David and his men what they needed (supplies and honor). She added value to him and thereby saved her life and that of her family.


What do you think? Agree/Disagree? Something to add? More thoughts on Nabal in the next post.

God bless,
GE


Hello GE,

I like what you have written a lot. :)

One thing though. Abigail went against her husbands wishes by giving supplies to David.

What is the biblical principle to this? Is it doing the right thing regardless or obeying God and not man or something else.

#8
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An example of poor leadership.

The wealthy man Nabal denied provisions for the army of God’s beloved David which had protected his livestock assets. The men of Nabal’s household were saved from death only because of the intervention of his wife Abigail. ( Another wise woman in the bible ) Nabal's poor leadership almost needlessly cost lives of people who served him.

Nabal acted selfishly and without good judgment or wisdom. He also did not give thanks to God for his many blessings.
1 Samuel 25.

Unselfishness, good judgment, and wisdom are vital leadership qualities.

Also ! If Nabal was a good leader he would accept the wise counsel of others which it appears was not his habit.


Why Did Nabal Fail?

1. Nabal grew wealthy and satisfied and didn't think he needed to build relationships. (vs. 2)
2. Nabal became selfish and distrustful of others; he couldn't overcome his evil temperament. (vs. 3)
3. Nabla neither gave nor received encouragement; he had grown numb to positive attitudes. (vs. 6)
4. Nabal forgot how others had blessed him in the past; he counted only his losses. (vs. 7, 8)
5. Nabal belittled people and forgot their names; his insecruity prevented his generosity. (vs. 10)
6. Nabal saw no reason to help others; he suffered from self-centered motives. (vs. 11)
7. Nabal wanted to build only his own "kingdom," not God's (vs. 11)

Four Word Pictures...
What could Nabal have done to improve his relational skills? HE could have stated by embracing the following pictures:

1. The Host
Just as a host takes innitiative and makes a guest feel comfortable in his or her home, so are we to host the relationships God gives us in our loves.

2. The Doctor
Just as doctor does not give a prescription before first making a diagnosis, we are to poke and prod others with questions, so that our responses match the relevant need.

3. The Counselor
A good counselor actively listens. Since the number one emotional need (the number 1 spiritual need is salvation through Jesus Christ) of people today is the need to be understood, we must deepen our listening skills.

4. The Tour Guide
You hire a tour guide to help you reach your planned destination. God wants us to serve as spiritual "tour guides" for others, helping them to reach their full potential in Christ.

Thoughts? Agree/disagree? Something to add?

God bless,
GE


1Sa 25:10-11 KJV And Nabal answered David's servants, and said, Who is David? and who is the son of Jesse? there be many servants now a days that break away every man from his master. (11) Shall I then take my bread, and my water, and my flesh that I have killed for my shearers, and give it unto men, whom I know not whence they be?


I find it unlikely that Nabal did not know who David was considering Abigail's obvious knowledge he was God's annointed.

Was Nabal playing dumb to excuse his selfish actions? A good leader should be careful who he makes enemies with.

#9
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I'm not sure I am on base with this. . . . But I will Give it a try.

God Uses David !

The Story of David and Goliath is Found in the First book of Samuel. (17) David was just a youth, the youngest of his three brothers. He was an armourbearer for Saul , untrained in War and was destined to defeat a man of war from youth. His weapon of choice was 5 smooth stones, a sling and the guidance of God.

1) David was just a young man, untrained, but held the Might of God in high esteem, confident in the Lords protection for Him. Knowing that he would be delivered before Goliath. Something interesting is that he says, "I come before you in the name of the Lord of Hosts." Then we look at John 14:13 "And whatever you ask in My name, that I will do, that the Father may be glorified in the Son" That same promise is presented; David came before the philistines in the name of the Lord; so that He may glorify His name. And it was done!!!

2) David was merely looked upon as a young child, most of all mocked for his "lack of wisdom in war" and coming before them with a stick. Little did they know just what he really came with !

3)David was of no real big name, just a young man representing God; being guided by Him in every way. He walked by faith; to me this not only represents the uniqueness of God's choice but it gives a true meaning to Gods dedication and love for us ! How far faith and favor can really go!


Thank you Jacob it seems calling on the name of the Lord can deliver physically and spiritually according to David later in life.

Psa_116:13 I will take the cup of salvation, and call upon the name of the LORD.

#10
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Those from the first discussion... http://www.worthychr...law-of-the-lid/ - OldShep, walla299, SavedByGrace1981, FresnoJoe, others any thoughts on this second law: The Law of Influence?

God bless,
GE

#11
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1Sa 25:10-11 KJV And Nabal answered David's servants, and said, Who is David? and who is the son of Jesse? there be many servants now a days that break away every man from his master. (11) Shall I then take my bread, and my water, and my flesh that I have killed for my shearers, and give it unto men, whom I know not whence they be?


I find it unlikely that Nabal did not know who David was considering Abigail's obvious knowledge he was God's annointed.

Was Nabal playing dumb to excuse his selfish actions? A good leader should be careful who he makes enemies with.



A few further thoughts on this passage in 1 Sam. 25:

There are four types of riches: what you have (material possessions), what you do (actions), what you know (knowledge), and what you are (character - which good character can only be learned from God). Nabal was a very rich man, but unfortunately only rich in what he had. He had the least valuable kind of riches – material possessions. He lacked in all other aspects of riches.

It is interesting to note too that Scripture gives Abigail great praise when it says she was of beautiful appearance. There are only two other women who have this Hebrew phrase applied to them - Rachel (Genesis 29:7) and Esther (Esther 2:7).

Why didn’t Nabal’s servants appeal to him to reconsider his actions against David? Nabal was a fool or a scoundrel. (2 Sam. 25:17)

Here’s a small sample of what God says about fools.

Prov. 3:35
The wise will inherit honor, but fools get disgrace.

Prov. 14:16
One who is wise is cautious and turns away from evil, but a fool is reckless and careless.

Prov. 18:6-7
A fool's lips walk into a fight, and his mouth invites a beating.
A fool's mouth is his ruin, and his lips are a snare to his soul.


Hello GE,

I like what you have written a lot. :)

One thing though. Abigail went against her husbands wishes by giving supplies to David.

What is the biblical principle to this? Is it doing the right thing regardless or obeying God and not man or something else.



Why did the servants go to Abigail? Because she was wise, trusted, and they knew she would take action to save her people.

A few things to note about Abigail: A. She did this without the approval of her husband. B. She openly criticized her husband.

A. Perhaps saving lives is justifiable when considering what the consequences to her not usurping her husband’s wrong position – the death of innocent people including all the males in Nabal’s household.

B. Her criticism of her husband was in contrast to her expectations of David – a man after God’s own heart. The point of the passage is how respectful and humble Abigail was to David.

2 Sam. 25:29
Yet a man has risen to pursue you and seek your life, but the life of my lord shall be bound in the bundle of the living with the Lord your God; and the lives of your enemies He shall sling out, as from the pocket of a sling.

This sentence reminds David to act like a man after God’s own heart and not stoop to Nabel’s level.

Your thoughts?

God bless,
GE

#12
GoldenEagle

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I'm not sure I am on base with this. . . . But I will Give it a try.

God Uses David !

The Story of David and Goliath is Found in the First book of Samuel. (17) David was just a youth, the youngest of his three brothers. He was an armourbearer for Saul , untrained in War and was destined to defeat a man of war from youth. His weapon of choice was 5 smooth stones, a sling and the guidance of God.

1) David was just a young man, untrained, but held the Might of God in high esteem, confident in the Lords protection for Him. Knowing that he would be delivered before Goliath. Something interesting is that he says, "I come before you in the name of the Lord of Hosts." Then we look at John 14:13 "And whatever you ask in My name, that I will do, that the Father may be glorified in the Son" That same promise is presented; David came before the philistines in the name of the Lord; so that He may glorify His name. And it was done!!!

2) David was merely looked upon as a young child, most of all mocked for his "lack of wisdom in war" and coming before them with a stick. Little did they know just what he really came with !

3)David was of no real big name, just a young man representing God; being guided by Him in every way. He walked by faith; to me this not only represents the uniqueness of God's choice but it gives a true meaning to Gods dedication and love for us ! How far faith and favor can really go!


This is a great post. Great thoughts Jacob. I discussed some of this on this thread: http://www.worthychr...law-of-the-lid/ Check it out let me know what you think.

I agree it’s amazing what God can do even with a young man who fears God and honors His name. David is a great example of a man who walked by faith.

I’d like to add to the idea of David’s influence and to bring up a difference time in David’s life.

D. The Law of Influence: God used David

1 Chron. 11:1-3
Then all Israel came together to David at Hebron, saying, “Indeed we are your bone and your flesh. 2 Also, in time past, even when Saul was king, you were the one who led Israel out and brought them in; and the Lord your God said to you, ‘You shall shepherd My people Israel, and be ruler over My people Israel.’” 3 Therefore all the elders of Israel came to the king at Hebron, and David made a covenant with them at Hebron before the Lord. And they anointed David king over Israel, according to the word of the Lord by Samuel.

As the Most influential man in the country David was leading long before Saul lost his throne.

Like it or not, position doesn’t make a person a leader do you agree? Title may give someone authority, but not influence. Influence comes from the person as a gift from God; however, it must be earned by followers. David had earned influence and Saul had not. Why was this so?

1. Unity: David rallied the people and created unity. (v. 1)
2. Identification: David identified with his followers. (v. 1)
3. Credibility: David effectively led various military campaigns. (v. 2)
4. Anointing: David enjoyed God’s hand power in his life. (v. 2)
5. Partnership: David worked cooperatively with key leaders, not over them. (v. 3)

David was an example of a leader with positive influence.

God bless,
GE


Source: Leadership material from John C. Maxwell.

#13
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Why did the servants go to Abigail? Because she was wise, trusted, and they knew she would take action to save her people.

A few things to note about Abigail: A. She did this without the approval of her husband. B. She openly criticized her husband.

A. Perhaps saving lives is justifiable when considering what the consequences to her not usurping her husband’s wrong position – the death of innocent people including all the males in Nabal’s household.

B. Her criticism of her husband was in contrast to her expectations of David – a man after God’s own heart. The point of the passage is how respectful and humble Abigail was to David.

2 Sam. 25:29
Yet a man has risen to pursue you and seek your life, but the life of my lord shall be bound in the bundle of the living with the Lord your God; and the lives of your enemies He shall sling out, as from the pocket of a sling.

This sentence reminds David to act like a man after God’s own heart and not stoop to Nabel’s level.

Your thoughts?

God bless,
GE


Yes I agree there is a time to disregard a foolish leader and do what is correct !

#14
Jayyycuuup

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I'm not sure I am on base with this. . . . But I will Give it a try.

God Uses David !

The Story of David and Goliath is Found in the First book of Samuel. (17) David was just a youth, the youngest of his three brothers. He was an armourbearer for Saul , untrained in War and was destined to defeat a man of war from youth. His weapon of choice was 5 smooth stones, a sling and the guidance of God.

1) David was just a young man, untrained, but held the Might of God in high esteem, confident in the Lords protection for Him. Knowing that he would be delivered before Goliath. Something interesting is that he says, "I come before you in the name of the Lord of Hosts." Then we look at John 14:13 "And whatever you ask in My name, that I will do, that the Father may be glorified in the Son" That same promise is presented; David came before the philistines in the name of the Lord; so that He may glorify His name. And it was done!!!

2) David was merely looked upon as a young child, most of all mocked for his "lack of wisdom in war" and coming before them with a stick. Little did they know just what he really came with !

3)David was of no real big name, just a young man representing God; being guided by Him in every way. He walked by faith; to me this not only represents the uniqueness of God's choice but it gives a true meaning to Gods dedication and love for us ! How far faith and favor can really go!


This is a great post. Great thoughts Jacob. I discussed some of this on this thread: http://www.worthychr...law-of-the-lid/ Check it out let me know what you think.

I agree it’s amazing what God can do even with a young man who fears God and honors His name. David is a great example of a man who walked by faith.

I’d like to add to the idea of David’s influence and to bring up a difference time in David’s life.

1 Chron. 11:1-3
Then all Israel came together to David at Hebron, saying, “Indeed we are your bone and your flesh. 2 Also, in time past, even when Saul was king, you were the one who led Israel out and brought them in; and the Lord your God said to you, ‘You shall shepherd My people Israel, and be ruler over My people Israel.’” 3 Therefore all the elders of Israel came to the king at Hebron, and David made a covenant with them at Hebron before the Lord. And they anointed David king over Israel, according to the word of the Lord by Samuel.

As the Most influential man in the country David was leading long before Saul lost his throne.

Like it or not, position doesn’t make a person a leader do you agree? Title may give someone authority, but not influence. Influence comes from the person as a gift from God; however, it must be earned by followers. David had earned influence and Saul had not. Why was this so?

1. Unity: David rallied the people and created unity. (v. 1)
2. Identification: David identified with his followers. (v. 1)
3. Credibility: David effectively led various military campaigns. (v. 2)
4. Anointing: David enjoyed God’s hand power in his life. (v. 2)
5. Partnership: David worked cooperatively with key leaders, not over them. (v. 3)

David was an example of a leader with influence.


Hello GE,

Thank you for that link as you had touched more on the account of David then I had brought up and it was refreshing.

And Yes I totally agree, title is only sufficient to Man; as looking in the bible; and we know it to be true that God uses ".....the foolish things of the world to confound the wise; and God hath chosen the weak things of the world to confound the things which are mighty; (1 Corinthians 1:27) Just in this case God had made David a perfect example of this verse.

#15
GoldenEagle

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E. The Law of Influence: Jephthah - Makes a Poor Leadership Choice

Judges 11:1-31

Jephthah, the ninth judge of Israel, may have been "a mighty man of valor" but he also began his life as "the son of a harlot." (Judges 11:1) From Jephthah we can learn some crucial leadership lessons from his life:

1. Even unlikely candidates can become influential leaders. (v. 1-3) This means anyone can lead if they seek God’s leadership.
2. People follow leaders because of their relevant gifts. (v. 4-6) In the case of Believers because of the evidence of the Holy Spirit in the person’s life.
3. Good leaders inquire about the request and result desired. (v. 7-11)
4. Effective leaders negotiate win/win agreements whenever possible. (v. 12-28)

Ironically, even though Jephthah modeled these lessons, he made a tragic choice just before God allowed him to conquer the Ammonites. He impetuaously voews to sacrifice to the Lord “whatever come out of the doors of my house to meet me.” (Judges 11:31) Sadly, his only child came out to greet him after his victory and his hasty vow cost him a beloved daughter. Jephthah’s life and actions teach us that:

5. Even the brightest of leaders can be overcome by their will or emotions.
6. Decision and commitments should not be made in a vacuum.
7. Leaders must weigh what they are willing to sacrifice, up front.
8. Good leaders follow through on their commitments, whatever the cost.

Thoughts?

God bless,
GE

Source: Leadership material from John C. Maxwell.

#16
LadyC

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my thoughts are this. it's not a salvational issue, so we shouldn't spend too much time being divided over it. on the other hand, it does deserve some discussion because even in the new testament, jephthah is referred to as a man of great faith.

there are two trains of thought on this. yours and mine. BOTH of our trains of thougths can be supported scripturally, and both are equally valid. the christian community is pretty much divided in half on the issue.

according to your view, he literally sacrificed his daughter's life.

according to my view, he followed the letter of God's law and redeemed his sacrifice, since his sacrifice was human, and therefore instead of dying, she spent her life dedicated to God, therefore never being allowed to marry or bear children.

to me, that makes far more sense, since jephthah was a man of God, and was so very clear on what the laws concerning sacrifice were. it fulfills his vow without making an enemy of God. to me, it's absurd that someone who fulfilled his vow in a way that God forbade would later be considered as a man of great faith in new testament writings.

so i'm not going to spend time debating it. all i ask is that both viewpoints be presented. until we're standing before God, neither side can or will be proven correct.

#17
GoldenEagle

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my thoughts are this. it's not a salvational issue, so we shouldn't spend too much time being divided over it. on the other hand, it does deserve some discussion because even in the new testament, jephthah is referred to as a man of great faith.

<snip>


I agreed that in the context of salvation it didn't really matter. And I'm not saying there isn't backing for what your view on that part of the passage is about. :)
Sorry dear Sister I didn't clarify this look at Jephthah was to look at this man's life in context of Biblical leadership. The focus isn't on whether his daughter died or lost her freedom to marry (remain a virgin) - either one was a very tragic death (immediate or over a lifetime either way ending Jephthah's lineage). Since we had discussed him in another thread I thought this might interest you. Forgive me for not communicating well?

What do you think of the lessons gleaned from Jephthah's life?

God bless,
GE

#18
LadyC

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LOL, you're forgiven. let me read it again in the proper context and get back with you on it. i'm typing this during a commercial, so i'm going to get back to my show and then take a long nap first. (i have to work graveyard tonight... gotta get some sleep so i can make it through my shift without hearing and seeing things that aren't there!) i'll check back and read through this again later this afternoon.

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GoldenEagle

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Moving along... To Samuel...

F. Samuel’s Influence
1 Sam. 7:1-17

It didn’t take long for the Israelites to get a taste of the leadership of their new judge and prophet, Samuel. The prophet’s influence grew daily. When the people trusted him, they were delivered from the Philistines, saw the ark returned to their land, and enjoyed peace in the land. He became by far the most influential leader of his day.

But how did he gain such influence? What made everyone listen to him? At least three indispensable qualities gained him the influence God gave Samuel:

1. Competence
God blessed Samuel with many gifts. He heard from the Lord, he could see the future unfold, and he wisely knew what to do in crisis. His abilities provided one reason that everyone listened to Samuel.

2. Character
Unlike Eli, Samuel exuded integrity and honestly faced each area of his life. Samuel truly trusted God. People trusted him and knew that he had Israel’s best interests in mind. They considered Samuel utterly trustworthy and depended upon him to intercede for them with God.

3. Connection
Samuel knew how to connect with people; he spoke their language. He expressed compassion for their predicaments and brought courage to their pursuits.

Competence + Character + Connection = Influence


Any thoughts here?

#20
GoldenEagle

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G. Esther’s Influence
Esther 1:12

When Queen Vashti refused to be put on display, King Ahasuerus grew angry. At the counsel of his advisors, he removed her from office (Esther 1), opening the door for Esther to take her spot as Queen. Esther serves as a marvelous illustration of how God uses one person’s influence to accomplish His plans. God used Esther to save her entire people from death and destruction. One obedient person in God’s hands can make the difference!

Much like God used Jesus Christ as our Redeeming Savior to pay for the price of the sins of humanity. (John 3:16)

Thoughts?




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