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Nine Year Old Looses 66 pounds


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#1
GoldenEagle

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Tought this might serve as an inspiration to some folks on the site. Exercise and healthy eating.

This was not easy and took some tough love. But one key word - persistence.

God bless,
GE

http://gma.yahoo.com...ews-health.html


Breanna Bond, 9, Loses 66 Pounds

By ABC News | ABC News Blogs – Mon, Dec 10, 2012 8:39 AM EST


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RvpIySenwfk



Breanna Bond weighed 186 pounds by the time she was 9 years old.

The extra weight made it difficult for her to breathe and move around. The California girl soon became a target for bullies. "Everybody at school would call me names," she said. "They would call me fatty, they would call me fat head."

Breanna's weight gain began when she was a baby, reaching 100 pounds by the time she got to kindergarten. She couldn't keep up with the friends who were running while they played.

"Her pediatrician always said that she'd grow into her body and then, after a while, we went and got other doctors' opinions," Breanna's mother, Heidi Bond of Clovis, Calif., said today on " Good Morning America." "We had her tested for everything from thyroid to diabetes - her endocrinology got tested - allergies, and everything came out fine so we knew at that point we had to step things up."

Bond and Breanna's father, Dan Bond, decided to take matters into their own hands. Heidi Bond designed an exercise routine for her daughter and the entire family. They began to walk the 4-mile trail near their home.

"There was nothing that stopped us," Heidi Bond said. "We went at night, in the rain, in the hail, in the fog, nothing. We had a zero-tolerance policy. We're doing the walk, no matter what."

Before long, Breanna had lost 37 pounds. In less than a year, her weight loss totaled 66 pounds.

In addition to following a diet that limits fat to 20 grams per day, Breanna also began using her home treadmill for an hour and 15 minutes each day. She also started to play basketball and joined the swim team.

"[That] I can be involved in sports and I can keep up with my friends when we're playing," Breanna said on "GMA" of her favorite aspect of her weight loss. "I can just move more."

Heidi Bond said Breanna inspires her every day.

"She is an inspiration to the world and all children who are having weight issues across America, that you can do it with a pair of tennis shoes and motivation," Bond said.

The Bonds offered three tips for other parents who are looking to keep their children healthy: start as soon as possible, exercise and enforce healthy eating habits.

"Don't be afraid to do the tough love," Dan Bond said on "GMA." "It's worth it in the long run. It's their life that's at stake."

#2
Leonard

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WALK FOUR MILES A DAY???? 20 GRAMS OF FAT A DAY???? TREADMILL FOR AN HOUR AND A HALF????

THE CURE IS WORSE THAN THE DISEASE!!!

#3
joi

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WALK FOUR MILES A DAY???? 20 GRAMS OF FAT A DAY???? TREADMILL FOR AN HOUR AND A HALF????

THE CURE IS WORSE THAN THE DISEASE!!!


But you did some of that yourself 'ol friend!

#4
~Shalhevet~

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How wonderful! :)

#5
FresnoJoe

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WALK FOUR MILES A DAY???? 20 GRAMS OF FAT A DAY???? TREADMILL FOR AN HOUR AND A HALF????

THE CURE IS WORSE THAN THE DISEASE!!!


lol ~ Amen~!

One Peanut Butter And Grape Jelly Sandwich

And She Can Run Circles Around The Two Of Us All Day Long, Laughing~!

~

Wonderful Job Kiddo~!


#6
GoldenEagle

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WALK FOUR MILES A DAY???? 20 GRAMS OF FAT A DAY???? TREADMILL FOR AN HOUR AND A HALF????

THE CURE IS WORSE THAN THE DISEASE!!!


Sorry but I disagree. Well, Brianna went from 186 to 120. She had a slow metabolism. Assuming her height is 5' 0" her BMI at 9 years old with 186 pounds was over 36.3. At 120 pounds she is at 23.4 BMI.

http://nhlbisupport.com/bmi/

BMI Categories:
  • Underweight = <18.5
  • Normal weight = 18.5–24.9
  • Overweight = 25–29.9
  • Obesity = BMI of 30 or greater

I had a close friend, we'll call her Holly, who struggled with weight all her life much like this little girl. I just imagine what would've been different if my friends parents had had the foresight to help her at the age of 9. She struggled with various diseases including bulimia as an adult.

The emotional and psychological weight (pun intended) that was lifted from Breanna's life is evident. Not to mention the benefit regarding the condition of her organs such as her heart, her blood pressure, etc.

Not saying everyone can do this. But I give kudos to the parents for helping her with this decision. To me the cure is not worse than the disease.

God bless,
GE

#7
GoldenEagle

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Obesity can cause serious problems for kids (and people in general) emotionally, psychologically, and physically. Among these are heart disease, sleeping issues, high blood pressure, depression, diabetes, etc.

From: http://www.aacap.org...ldren_and_teens

Obesity In Children And Teens


The problem of childhood obesity in the United States has grown considerably in recent years. Between 16 and 33 percent of children and adolescents are obese. Obesity is among the easiest medical conditions to recognize but most difficult to treat. Unhealthy weight gain due to poor diet and lack of exercise is responsible for over 300,000 deaths each year. The annual cost to society for obesity is estimated at nearly $100 billion. Overweight children are much more likely to become overweight adults unless they adopt and maintain healthier patterns of eating and exercise.

What is obesity?
A few extra pounds does not suggest obesity. However they may indicate a tendency to gain weight easily and a need for changes in diet and/or exercise. Generally, a child is not considered obese until the weight is at least 10 percent higher than what is recommended for their height and body type. Obesity most commonly begins between the ages of 5 and 6, or during adolescence. Studies have shown that a child who is obese between the ages of 10 and 13 has an 80 percent chance of becoming an obese adult.

What causes obesity?
The causes of obesity are complex and include genetic, biological, behavioral and cultural factors. Obesity occurs when a person eats more calories than the body burns up. If one parent is obese, there is a 50 percent chance that their children will also be obese. However, when both parents are obese, their children have an 80 percent chance of being obese. Although certain medical disorders can cause obesity, less than 1 percent of all obesity is caused by physical problems. Obesity in childhood and adolescence can be related to:

  • poor eating habits
  • overeating or binging
  • lack of exercise (i.e., couch potato kids)
  • family history of obesity
  • medical illnesses (endocrine, neurological problems)
  • medications (steroids, some psychiatric medications)
  • stressful life events or changes (separations, divorce, moves, deaths, abuse)
  • family and peer problems
  • low self-esteem
  • depression or other emotional problems
What are risks and complications of obesity?
There are many risks and complications with obesity. Physical consequences include:
  • increased risk of heart disease
  • high blood pressure
  • diabetes
  • breathing problems
  • trouble sleeping
Child and adolescent obesity is also associated with increased risk of emotional problems. Teens with weight problems tend to have much lower self-esteem and be less popular with their peers. Depression, anxiety, and obsessive compulsive disorder can also occur.
How can obesity be managed and treated?
Obese children need a thorough medical evaluation by a pediatrician or family physician to consider the possibility of a physical cause. In the absence of a physical disorder, the only way to lose weight is to reduce the number of calories being eaten and to increase the level of physical activity. Lasting weight loss can only occur when there is self-motivation. Since obesity often affects more than one family member, making healthy eating and regular exercise a family activity can improve the chances of successful weight control for the child or adolescent.
Ways to manage obesity in children and adolescents include:
  • start a weight-management program
  • change eating habits (eat slowly, develop a routine)
  • plan meals and make better food selections (eat less fatty foods, avoid junk and fast foods)
  • control portions and consume less calories
  • increase physical activity (especially walking) and have a more active lifestyle
  • know what your child eats at school
  • eat meals as a family instead of while watching television or at the computer
  • do not use food as a reward
  • limit snacking
  • attend a support group (e.g., Overeaters Anonymous)
Obesity frequently becomes a lifelong issue. The reason most obese adolescents gain back their lost pounds is that they tend to go back to their old habits of eating and exercising. An obese adolescent must therefore learn to eat and enjoy healthy foods in moderate amounts and to exercise regularly to maintain a desired weight. Parents of an obese child can improve their child's self esteem by emphasizing their strengths and positive qualities rather than just focusing on their weight problem.

When a child or adolescent with obesity also has emotional problems, a child and adolescent psychiatrist can work with the child's family physician to develop a comprehensive treatment plan. Such a plan would include reasonable weight loss goals, dietary and physical activity management, behavior modification, and family involvement.


I'm not sure about the whole psychiatrist thing but having at least plan to avoid a potential lifelong problem seems reasonable.

God bless,
GE

#8
walla299

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WALK FOUR MILES A DAY???? 20 GRAMS OF FAT A DAY???? TREADMILL FOR AN HOUR AND A HALF????

THE CURE IS WORSE THAN THE DISEASE!!!


What's so bad about that? :huh:

I hate treadmills, so I just do the 10 mile commute from work a few days a week on the mountain bike.

#9
GoldenEagle

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WALK FOUR MILES A DAY???? 20 GRAMS OF FAT A DAY???? TREADMILL FOR AN HOUR AND A HALF????

THE CURE IS WORSE THAN THE DISEASE!!!


What's so bad about that? :huh:

I hate treadmills, so I just do the 10 mile commute from work a few days a week on the mountain bike.


10 Miles on the mountain bike? Nice. :thumbsup: Saves money on gas too I bet. :mgcheerful:




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