Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

17 things your flight attendant will not tell you

5 posts in this topic

Posted · Report post

The flight attendant used to be a good job years ago with good pay and good benefits......not any longer.

http://www.foxnews.c...intcmp=HPBucket

I remember watching a documentary on the first flights of airlines, they were extravagent, with full course meals, and talk about room, everyone flew first class

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

5. Yes, we can upgrade you to business class or first class after the airplane’s doors close. No, we don’t do it very often, partly because on some airlines we have to file a report explaining why we did it, partly because there has to be a meal for you, and partly because the forward cabins are often full. Who do we upgrade? Not the slob who’s dressed in a dirty tank top. It helps if you’re extremely nice, well dressed, pregnant, very tall, good looking, one of our friends, or all of the above.

That actually happened to me. I was wearing a suit and cashmere longcoat when I was getting ready to board a flight from Italy to Houston to visit my parents. I got upgraded from Coach to Business Class for the trip to Houston and the trip back to Italy. But, I was very nice when they couldn't find my reservation, and was I dressed well enough that I didn't look out of place in that section.

I am disappointed that the airlines have cut back on how they pay their service crews, I am sure that doesn't happen to the pilots.

That's funny about the decaf, makes sense, but if it's a short flight, I don't really see the need to do that. Also, a lot of people have to work while they are flying, so if they ask for regular coffee, they should get it. I don't know if just one flight attendent was interviewed, but she/he sounds too paternalistic for that job.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

  1. the way its getting I won't be surprised if they don't just stop all service altogether, and just have an armed guard who will dictate whether you get to go to the bathroom or not.

Its really silly how they make the pilot go through TSA, and search for weapons...........he's the pilot! he could lock the cabin door and drill the plane into the side of a mountian.........lol

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

justin, i don't work for any airline, but i seem to recall hearing a while back that pilots don't get paid for the pre-flight time either anymore. i'm sure they get paid for the time they're doing the checklists and taxi-ing, but they've still had their time cut back.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted · Report post

here, i found this on http://thetruthabout...t-salaries.html

Pilots aren't paid like any other hourly worker in other professions. Despite the fact that professional pilots work 8, 10, 12 hour+ days just like any other professional, they are only compensated for the time considered "in flight." For most flying jobs, unless it's a salaried position, that usually means that they are paid from when the parking brake is released at the departure point until the brake is set upon arrival at the destination. It's not uncommon for a flight instructor or an airline pilot to work a 12 hour day and only actually get paid for 5 to 6 hours of that time- and sometimes less!

and here i found these tidbits of info. suffice it to say, i'll be booking all future flights with southwest airlines. no wonder my sis-in-law says they have the highest customer satisfaction rate.

Congress expressed shock and dismay to learn that regional airline pilots start at very low salaries after the NTSB said the co-pilot on the Colgan Air commuter plane that crashed near Buffalo on Feb. 12 earned only $16,000 a year. (The company later said she earned $23,900.)

<snip>

On the low end, first-year pilots at US Airways would, theoretically, earn a minimum $21,600 a year. For that, they would work 72 hours a month at the controls of a plane (lots more hours are involved in flight preparations, overnights and sitting around waiting).

<snip>

At the top end of the airline scale, Southwest Airlines has a first-year minimum of $49,572. Southwest typically hires more-experienced pilots than other airlines do, so it can demand thousands of hours in the logbook -– enough to qualify to fly as a captain -– from its applicants.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0