Jump to content

christian forums

Worthy Christian Forums - Christian Forums

Welcome to Worthy Christian Forums
Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. If you already have an account, login here - otherwise create an account for free today!
Photo

Nelson Mandela

* * * * * 1 votes

This topic has been archived. This means that you cannot reply to this topic.
75 replies to this topic

#1
tljministry

tljministry
  • Members
  • 12 posts

Was Nelson Mandela really a hero as portrayed by the News Media? Conspiracy theorists also have their view about this African President. How do Christians also see Mandela: Share your idea and let's learn

 

nelsonmandela.jpg



#2
OakWood

OakWood

    Royal Member

  • Royal Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,780 posts

Well here's a different view of him that you don't hear so often:

 

http://www.wnd.com/2...-his-own-words/



#3
other one

other one

    Royal Member

  • Royal Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 21,570 posts

i'll not post anything negative for a month at least.......   



#4
FresnoJoe

FresnoJoe

    Royal Member

  • Worthy Watchman
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 40,550 posts

Well here's a different view of him that you don't hear so often:

 

http://www.wnd.com/2...-his-own-words/

 

:thumbsup:

 

~

 

Man

 

There is a generation, whose teeth are as swords, and their jaw teeth as knives, to devour the poor from off the earth, and the needy from among men. Proverbs 30:14

 

And God

 

Then said Jesus unto them again, Verily, verily, I say unto you, I am the door of the sheep. All that ever came before me are thieves and robbers: but the sheep did not hear them.

 

I am the door: by me if any man enter in, he shall be saved, and shall go in and out, and find pasture.

 

The thief cometh not, but for to steal, and to kill, and to destroy: I am come that they might have life, and that they might have it more abundantly. John  10:7-10

 

Notice Any Difference?

 

But God commendeth his love toward us, in that, while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us. Romans 5:8



#5
Guest_man_*

Guest_man_*
  • Guests

Where is the fruit in disparaging a dead man?



#6
ncn

ncn

    Royal Member

  • Worthy Chat Servant
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,134 posts

As this is in the controversial forum , I'll say something perhaps controversial.  

 

Nelson Mandela has not even been buried yet, his memorial service was held today.

The state funeral is on Sunday. 

 

Perhaps, out of respect for his family and South Africa, we could wait until after that if anyone wishes to pull him apart.

 

We also have South African members on Worthy who are in mourning.

 

Praying.

 

With love Nigel.  



#7
*Zion*

*Zion*

    Senior Member

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,517 posts

Was Nelson Mandela really a hero as portrayed by the News Media? Conspiracy theorists also have their view about this African President. How do Christians also see Mandela: Share your idea and let's learn

 

He was actually a Christian.  Look, who's perfect?  Moses was a murderer, Paul had people murdered, Peter denied Jesus three times... God forgives and forgets and chooses to work wonders through His servants, and uses their lives to teach others.  Let's forgive and forget too, and learn from the simple people God has chosen to make great. :)



#8
OakWood

OakWood

    Royal Member

  • Royal Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,780 posts

Where is the fruit in disparaging a dead man?

 

There is none and I would never judge Mandela himself for he may have died with Christian beliefs.

However, we can judge whether he should be seen as a hero. Was he a reformer? Was he a great leader? Does he deserve the adulation that the World seems to be giving him now? Is Obama right to attend his funeral when he shunned Margaret Thatcher's? Many questions can be asked, because at the moment the World appears to have turned Nelson Mandela into a role-model. A role-model for what?



#9
Guest_HisG_*

Guest_HisG_*
  • Guests
I would hate it if people kept judging me based on my life before I was a Christian.

#10
other one

other one

    Royal Member

  • Royal Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 21,570 posts
Nelson Mandela, Christian
A little-appreciated factor in his political development
9 December 2013
 

Nelson Mandela lived several lives: Communist militant, pacifist prisoner, and charismatic president. He was also the only recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize to receive both the USSR’s International Lenin Peace Prize and the American Presidential Medal of Freedom. What was the thread linking these successive and somewhat contradictory lives? Let me propose a hypothesis that his prison guards would certainly confirm, as would the Afrikaners who negotiated the end of apartheid with him: Mandela’s Christian faith led him from violence to redemption.

 

Mandela was a Christian, as I learned during a long conversation with him at a 1992 meeting in Durban of the South African Foundation, a business-backed anti-apartheid organization. The aura surrounding him then, felt by all who spoke with Mandela, was more mystical than political. Most South Africans, whatever their skin color, are Christians. The country’s ruling Afrikaners saw themselves as a tribe of Israel in exile. They adhered to an assiduous reading of the Old Testament, and an understanding of Christianity that they spread throughout South Africa. The reconciliation between the African National Congress (ANC) and the apartheid government of F.W. de Klerk (president until 1991) was an act of shared faith between two men who belonged to the same syncretic Christian tradition. The West’s economic blockade contributed to ending apartheid but did not bring Mandela and de Klerk together. It was not only the boycott of South African oranges by European and American consumers that overcame apartheid, but also belief in Christ.

 

Faith also explains and clarifies the path that led Mandela from Communism to liberal democracy and from violent action to peaceful reconciliation. Recall that in 1962, Mandela was sentenced to life in prison for his role in organizing bombings of police stations—a very real crime. In the years when Mandela played a significant but not leading role in the organization, the ANC was a branch of the Communist International. With Soviet support, the ANC preached violent revolution. Mandela’s incarceration was politically unjust, but it was well-founded legally, as Mandela himself never denied. While in prison, he lost faith in revolution and in Communism. Was this because of the collapse of the USSR, as his adversaries believed at the time? Or was it the result of a personal meditation? The latter seems more likely: Mandela’s prison cell on Robben Island, filled with his books and manuscripts, had something of a monastic spirit.

 

Christ was not the only prophet who served as inspiration to Mandela in his cell. There was also Gandhi, who, like Mandela, had practiced law in South Africa. In his work in the Indian community of Durban, where he conceived of and applied the principle of nonviolence to overcome white racism, Gandhi acknowledged the direct inspiration of Christ’s Sermon on the Mount. The lesson was not lost on Mandela: non-violence and the force of truth (satyagraha) are more effective than violent confrontation, but only when applied within a society that shares the same Christian and humanist values. As Mandela would, Gandhi appealed to the conscience of whites, both in South Africa and beyond; he won effective recognition by the British as the figurehead of Indian independence before he arrived in India. Similarly, Mandela was “recognized” outside of South Africa as the obvious leader of national liberation, before achieving this status domestically. (Anglican Bishop Desmond Tutu, who succeeded in persuading American and British Protestants that the end of apartheid was an ethical imperative, played a key role as well.)

 

Mandela’s faith made possible not only the reconciliation of blacks and whites under the same national flag, but also—and this is often overlooked in Europe and America—the reconciliation of enemy groups among South Africa’s numerous black factions and communities. In the age of apartheid, hostility between the Xhosas (Mandela’s ethnic group) and the Zulus (ethnic group of the current president, Jacob Zuma), was at least as intense as that between blacks and whites. In those days, the Zulus often sided with whites against the Xhosas, Indians, and other “mixed” minorities. South Africa was then, and remains, an ethnic puzzle.

 

The Commission for Truth and Reconciliation, founded by President Mandela and led by Bishop Tutu, is perhaps the most concrete example of Mandela’s Christian faith. Instead of the vengeance and reprisals that were expected and feared after years of interracial violence, the commission focused on confession and forgiveness. Most of those who admitted misdeeds and even crimes—whether committed in the name of or in opposition to apartheid—received amnesty. Many returned to civil life, exonerated by their admission of guilt.

 

Few twentieth-century statesmen have improved our world. Even fewer were inspired by religious faith rather than ideology. The European Union’s Christian founders —France’s Robert Schuman, Italy’s Alcide De Gasperi, and Germany’s Konrad Adenauer—prayed together before making decisions. Poland’s Lech Walesa and South Korea’s Kim Dae-Jung, both fervent Catholics and Nobel Peace Prize winners, forgave their Soviet and military oppressors by explicitly referring to their faith. This is the paradox of an age we call secular, but which is in truth haunted by transcendence.

 

http://www.city-jour.../eon1209gs.html



#11
Fez

Fez

    Royal Member

  • Servant
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 13,644 posts

Where is the fruit in disparaging a dead man?

Not me man, I have been watching a nature documentary called the Sisterhood, it's an amazing film about hyaenas, so I have not been on Worthy much today. But I did learn a lot about hyaenas!

 

Did you know for instance that they survive by attacking far more live prey than they do by scavenging? . The park I work in has at least two known dens, one in a drainpipe under the road, and I see them every now and again, but have not seen them hunting yet.

 

But I digress, and far be it for me to derail a controversial thread.

 

Carry on, people, carry on....



#12
*Zion*

*Zion*

    Senior Member

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,517 posts

How do you feel about him, Fez?



#13
Butero

Butero

    Royal Member

  • Soapbox - Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 20,764 posts

Where is the fruit in disparaging a dead man?

You have a point there.  I will just say I am not a fan, and never have been.  I opposed all efforts by the U.S. government to force change in the South African government through sanctions during the apartheid debate.  Had I lived in South Africa, I would have opposed the changes to the government.  I believe they made a huge mistake, and I feel like DeClerk thought if he led the charge for change, the people would love him and re-elect him.  He was very foolish. 

 

I don't feel like his death warrants all the coverage.  I don't remember this much being said about the death of Gerald Ford, and he was a former American President.  There are a lot of things out there about who Nelson Mandela was, and I could go further in my comments about him, but Man is right.  He has been out of power for sometime, and just passed away.  I didn't  tear down Ted Kennedy when he died, because I figured no good can come from attacking the dead, so I will refrain from further comments here.  May he rest in peace.   



#14
Butero

Butero

    Royal Member

  • Soapbox - Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 20,764 posts

How do you feel about him, Fez?

I don't know that it would be wise for Fez to comment on him.  All countries don't have the same absolute freedom of speech we enjoy in America, and I am not sure how things are in South Africa.  It is one thing for me to defend the former government, and quite another for someone living in South Africa to do so. 



#15
Guest_man_*

Guest_man_*
  • Guests

 

Where is the fruit in disparaging a dead man?

 

There is none and I would never judge Mandela himself for he may have died with Christian beliefs.

However, we can judge whether he should be seen as a hero. Was he a reformer? Was he a great leader? Does he deserve the adulation that the World seems to be giving him now? Is Obama right to attend his funeral when he shunned Margaret Thatcher's? Many questions can be asked, because at the moment the World appears to have turned Nelson Mandela into a role-model. A role-model for what?

 

 

 

Judging whether he should be seen as a hero or not is in fact judging the man. And really, in all honesty, who cares how the world sees him. If the world wants to put him on a pedestal, let'em. What business does a christian have with the affairs of the world? 



#16
*Zion*

*Zion*

    Senior Member

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,517 posts

 

How do you feel about him, Fez?

I don't know that it would be wise for Fez to comment on him.  All countries don't have the same absolute freedom of speech we enjoy in America, and I am not sure how things are in South Africa.  It is one thing for me to defend the former government, and quite another for someone living in South Africa to do so. 

 

 Well seeing as it is his country and his former president, I would much rather ask him; that's all. 



#17
*Zion*

*Zion*

    Senior Member

  • Senior Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,517 posts

I would hate it if people kept judging me based on my life before I was a Christian.

 

I hear you...



#18
Butero

Butero

    Royal Member

  • Soapbox - Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 20,764 posts

 

 

How do you feel about him, Fez?

I don't know that it would be wise for Fez to comment on him.  All countries don't have the same absolute freedom of speech we enjoy in America, and I am not sure how things are in South Africa.  It is one thing for me to defend the former government, and quite another for someone living in South Africa to do so. 

 

 Well seeing as it is his country and his former president, I would much rather ask him; that's all. 

 

If he can give a completely honest response without getting in trouble, I would be interested to.  He definitely has more insight than those of us looking at things from other parts of the globe. 



#19
OakWood

OakWood

    Royal Member

  • Royal Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,780 posts

 

 

Where is the fruit in disparaging a dead man?

 

There is none and I would never judge Mandela himself for he may have died with Christian beliefs.

However, we can judge whether he should be seen as a hero. Was he a reformer? Was he a great leader? Does he deserve the adulation that the World seems to be giving him now? Is Obama right to attend his funeral when he shunned Margaret Thatcher's? Many questions can be asked, because at the moment the World appears to have turned Nelson Mandela into a role-model. A role-model for what?

 

 

 

Judging whether he should be seen as a hero or not is in fact judging the man. And really, in all honesty, who cares how the world sees him. If the world wants to put him on a pedestal, let'em. What business does a christian have with the affairs of the world? 

 

 

Judging whether he should be seen as a hero is NOT judging the man (if anything, it's judging those who revere him).

If somebody saw me as a hero, I would want to know why. I have done nothing to justify it. If somebody saw Adolf Hitler as a hero, I would also want to know why. Likewise, if somebody saw

Francis of Assissi as a hero, I would want to know why.

 

A Christian has every right to be interested in the affairs of the World.  We are told to keep watch and look out for signs.



#20
Guest_man_*

Guest_man_*
  • Guests

Judging whether he should be seen as a hero is NOT judging the man (if anything, it's judging those who revere him).

 

 

How exactly are you going to make that determination without judging the man's character?

 

To determine whether this man is worthy of the hero title, you must first examine the man. 






Worthy Christian Forums - Christian Message Boards - 1999-2014 part of the Worthy Network