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Ways Rich People Think Differently?


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#1
GoldenEagle

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With all the discussion about minimum wage increases, redistribution, healthcare, etc. I thought this was intersting...

Habbits, choices, etc. have a lot to do with peeple's personal financial situation. So came across this article today figured I'd get some input and start a discussion...

 

21 Ways Rich People Think Differently
 
By Mandi Woodruff | Business Insider – Tue, Sep 4, 2012 10:50 AM EDT
 
World's richest woman Gina Rinehart is enduring a media firestorm over an article in which she takes the "jealous" middle class to task for "drinking, or smoking and socializing" rather than working to earn their own fortune.

What if she has a point?

Steve Siebold, author of "How Rich People Think," spent nearly three decades interviewing millionaires around the world to find out what separates them from everyone else.

It had little to do with money itself, he told Business Insider. It was about their mentality.

"[The middle class] tells people to be happy with what they have," he said. "And on the whole, most people are steeped in fear when it comes to money."

1. Average people think MONEY is the root of all evil. Rich people believe POVERTY is the root of all evil.

"The average person has been brainwashed to believe rich people are lucky or dishonest," Siebold writes.

That's why there's a certain shame that comes along with "getting rich" in lower-income communities.

"The world class knows that while having money doesn't guarantee happiness, it does make your life easier and more enjoyable."

2. Average people think selfishness is a vice. Rich people think selfishness is a virtue.

"The rich go out there and try to make themselves happy. They don't try to pretend to save the world," Siebold told Business Insider.

The problem is that middle class people see that as a negative––and it's keeping them poor, he writes.

"If you're not taking care of you, you're not in a position to help anyone else. You can't give what you don't have."

3. Average people have a lottery mentality. Rich people have an action mentality.

"While the masses are waiting to pick the right numbers and praying for prosperity, the great ones are solving problems," Siebold writes.

"The hero [middle class people] are waiting for may be God, government, their boss or their spouse. It's the average person's level of thinking that breeds this approach to life and living while the clock keeps ticking away."

4. Average people think the road to riches is paved with formal education. Rich people believe in acquiring specific knowledge.

"Many world-class performers have little formal education, and have amassed their wealth through the acquisition and subsequent sale of specific knowledge," he writes.

"Meanwhile, the masses are convinced that master's degrees and doctorates are the way to wealth, mostly because they are trapped in the linear line of thought that holds them back from higher levels of consciousness...The wealthy aren't interested in the means, only the end."

5. Average people long for the good old days. Rich people dream of the future.

"Self-made millionaires get rich because they're willing to bet on themselves and project their dreams, goals and ideas into an unknown future," Siebold writes.

"People who believe their best days are behind them rarely get rich, and often struggle with unhappiness and depression."

6. Average people see money through the eyes of emotion. Rich people think about money logically.

"An ordinarily smart, well-educated and otherwise successful person can be instantly transformed into a fear-based, scarcity driven thinker whose greatest financial aspiration is to retire comfortably," he writes.

"The world class sees money for what it is and what it's not, through the eyes of logic. The great ones know money is a critical tool that presents options and opportunities."

7. Average people earn money doing things they don't love. Rich people follow their passion.

"To the average person, it looks like the rich are working all the time," Siebold says. "But one of the smartest strategies of the world class is doing what they love and finding a way to get paid for it."

On the other hand, middle class take jobs they don't enjoy "because they need the money and they've been trained in school and conditioned by society to live in a linear thinking world that equates earning money with physical or mental effort."

8. Average people set low expectations so they're never disappointed. Rich people are up for the challenge.

"Psychologists and other mental health experts often advise people to set low expectations for their life to ensure they are not disappointed," Siebold writes.

"No one would ever strike it rich and live their dreams without huge expectations."

9. Average people believe you have to DO something to get rich. Rich people believe you have to BE something to get rich.

"That's why people like Donald Trump go from millionaire to nine billion dollars in debt and come back richer than ever," he writes.

"While the masses are fixated on the doing and the immediate results of their actions, the great ones are learning and growing from every experience, whether it's a success or a failure, knowing their true reward is becoming a human success machine that eventually produces outstanding results."

10. Average people believe you need money to make money. Rich people use other people's money.

Linear thought might tell people to make money in order to earn more, but Siebold says the rich aren't afraid to fund their future from other people's pockets.

"Rich people know not being solvent enough to personally afford something is not relevant. The real question is, 'Is this worth buying, investing in, or pursuing?'" he writes.


11. Average people believe the markets are driven by logic and strategy. Rich people know they're driven by emotion and greed.

Investing successfully in the stock market isn't just about a fancy math formula.

"The rich know that the primary emotions that drive financial markets are fear and greed, and they factor this into all trades and trends they observe," Siebold writes.

"This knowledge of human nature and its overlapping impact on trading give them strategic advantage in building greater wealth through leverage."

12. Average people live beyond their means. Rich people live below theirs.

"Here's how to live below your means and tap into the secret wealthy people have used for centuries: Get rich so you can afford to," he writes. 

"The rich live below their means, not because they're so savvy, but because they make so much money that they can afford to live like royalty while still having a king's ransom socked away for the future."

13. Average people teach their children how to survive. Rich people teach their kids to get rich.

Rich parents teach their kids from an early age about the world of "haves" and "have-nots," Siebold says. Even he admits many people have argued that he's supporting the idea of elitism.

He disagrees.

"[People] say parents are teaching their kids to look down on the masses because they're poor. This isn't true," he writes. "What they're teaching their kids is to see the world through the eyes of objective reality––the way society really is."

If children understand wealth early on, they'll be more likely to strive for it later in life.

14. Average people let money stress them out. Rich people find peace of mind in wealth.

The reason wealthy people earn more wealth is that they're not afraid to admit that money can solve most problems, Siebold says.

"[The middle class] sees money as a never-ending necessary evil that must be endured as part of life. The world class sees money as the great liberator, and with enough of it, they are able to purchase financial peace of mind."

15. Average people would rather be entertained than educated. Rich people would rather be educated than entertained.

While the rich don't put much stock in furthering wealth through formal education, they appreciate the power of learning long after college is over, Siebold says.

"Walk into a wealthy person's home and one of the first things you'll see is an extensive library of books they've used to educate themselves on how to become more successful," he writes.

"The middle class reads novels, tabloids and entertainment magazines."

16. Average people think rich people are snobs. Rich people just want to surround themselves with like-minded people.

The negative money mentality poisoning the middle class is what keeps the rich hanging out with the rich, he says.

"[Rich people] can't afford the messages of doom and gloom," he writes. "This is often misinterpreted by the masses as snobbery.

Labeling the world class as snobs is another way the middle class finds to feel better about themselves and their chosen path of mediocrity."

17. Average people focus on saving. Rich people focus on earning.

Siebold theorizes that the wealthy focus on what they'll gain by taking risks, rather than how to save what they have.

"The masses are so focused on clipping coupons and living frugally they miss major opportunities," he writes.

"Even in the midst of a cash flow crisis, the rich reject the nickle and dime thinking of the masses. They are the masters of focusing their mental energy where it belongs: on the big money."

18. Average people play it safe with money. Rich people know when to take risks.

"Leverage is the watchword of the rich," Siebold writes.

"Every investor loses money on occasion, but the world class knows no matter what happens, they will aways be able to earn more."

19. Average people love to be comfortable. Rich people find comfort in uncertainty.

For the most part, it takes guts to take the risks necessary to make it as a millionaire––a challenge most middle class thinkers aren't comfortable living with.

"Physical, psychological, and emotional comfort is the primary goal of the middle class mindset," Siebold writes.

World class thinkers learn early on that becoming a millionaire isn't easy and the need for comfort can be devastating. They learn to be comfortable while operating in a state of ongoing uncertainty."

20. Average people never make the connection between money and health. Rich people know money can save your life.

While the middle class squabbles over the virtues of Obamacare and their company's health plan, the super wealthy are enrolled in a super elite "boutique medical care" association, Siebold says.

"They pay a substantial yearly membership fee that guarantees them 24-hour access to a private physician who only serves a small group of members," he writes.

"Some wealthy neighborhoods have implemented this strategy and even require the physician to live in the neighborhood."

21. Average people believe they must choose between a great family and being rich. Rich people know you can have it all.

The idea the wealth must come at the expense of family time is nothing but a "cop-out", Siebold says.

"The masses have been brainwashed to believe it's an either/or equation," he writes. "The rich know you can have anything you want if you approach the challenge with a mindset rooted in love and abundance."

 
We know the Bible says that the love of money is the root of all evil. (1 Tim. 6:10) Yet do we think like rich or poor people? From a Christian Perspective how do we approach this type of thinking? Do you agree or disagree with the above?

God bless,

GE



 



#2
shiloh357

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With regard to point #2, I think there needs to be a line drawn between selfishness and self-care    You cannot help others if your needs and the needs of your family haven't been met and I think it is a biblical virtue to look after one's family first before attempting to look after others.

 

This is a really good and informative article.  Thanks for posting it.



#3
OneLight

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Consider the full difference between how the thought process works in three financial categories of life: poverty, middle class and rich.  The key is to understand the differences.  A person may be middle class in wealth, but still maintains the through process of someone in poverty making it hard for them to advance out of that train of thought, if, in fact, they want to advance to how the middle class thinks.

 

Bridges out of Poverty and Getting Ahead in a just getting by World are two great classes to take and understand.  Without knowing how the thought process works within the developed groups, a discussion like this can only cause more issues.



#4
GoldenEagle

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With regard to point #2, I think there needs to be a line drawn between selfishness and self-care    You cannot help others if your needs and the needs of your family haven't been met and I think it is a biblical virtue to look after one's family first before attempting to look after others.

 

This is a really good and informative article.  Thanks for posting it.

 

I think the terms in #2 are a bit off as well.
 

2. Average people think selfishness is a vice. Rich people think selfishness is a virtue.

"The rich go out there and try to make themselves happy. They don't try to pretend to save the world," Siebold told Business Insider.

The problem is that middle class people see that as a negative––and it's keeping them poor, he writes.

"If you're not taking care of you, you're not in a position to help anyone else. You can't give what you don't have."

 

Dave Ramsey says "Live like no one else so that later you can live like no one else."

DR also says to save, give, spend. I'd suggest that it's more of give, save, spend, give. In other words pay God first (give); save some for an emergency, mission trip, or vacation (save); spend money on the things that are necessary like food, shelter, clothing and transportation (spend); and then give generously as God prompts you (give).

I do think you bring up a good point Shiloh that it is important to take care of one's family first before being generous.

Question: Does this spill over into ministry as well? Do we prioritize our time around our family second (first I think should be our walk with God) or ministry?

God bless,

GE



#5
shiloh357

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With regard to point #2, I think there needs to be a line drawn between selfishness and self-care    You cannot help others if your needs and the needs of your family haven't been met and I think it is a biblical virtue to look after one's family first before attempting to look after others.

 

This is a really good and informative article.  Thanks for posting it.

 

I think the terms in #2 are a bit off as well.
 

2. Average people think selfishness is a vice. Rich people think selfishness is a virtue.

"The rich go out there and try to make themselves happy. They don't try to pretend to save the world," Siebold told Business Insider.

The problem is that middle class people see that as a negative––and it's keeping them poor, he writes.

"If you're not taking care of you, you're not in a position to help anyone else. You can't give what you don't have."

 

Dave Ramsey says "Live like no one else so that later you can live like no one else."

DR also says to save, give, spend. I'd suggest that it's more of give, save, spend, give. In other words pay God first (give); save some for an emergency, mission trip, or vacation (save); spend money on the things that are necessary like food, shelter, clothing and transportation (spend); and then give generously as God prompts you (give).

I do think you bring up a good point Shiloh that it is important to take care of one's family first before being generous.

Question: Does this spill over into ministry as well? Do we prioritize our time around our family second (first I think should be our walk with God) or ministry?

God bless,

GE

 

One reason that pastors end up with rebellious children is that their churches make huge demands of their time and expect their family needs to take precedence over the needs of their pastor's family.   I cannot tell you the number of stories I have heard of how pastors were expected to cancel family vacations at te last minute for funerals.  Some kids resent churches for taking their fathers away from them.

 

Pastors need to be more bold in protecting their family time, and they need to have contingencies in place so that if a funeral does come up there is someone to stand in and families need to understand that they cannot demand that only the pastor officiate their funeral.

 

Pastors need to prioritize family over  the church and the church they are pastoring needs to have that understanding cemented in their minds when they vote a pastor in.



#6
Marnie

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Excellent article.  Point #2, though, is not worded correctly, unless the author was trying to be deliberately provocative.  Selfishness is never vitruous, and to be honest, I have found those who think they are poor to be the most selfish.  I say think, because a lot of people have this weird "poverty mentality," that causes them to see themselves as poor when they are, in fact, not.  The better choice instead of seflishness would be "rational self-interest," because that is what this describes:

 

If you're not taking care of you, you're not in a position to help anyone else. You can't give what you don't have.

 

 

And shiloh is 100% correct in what he wrote re: pastors:

 

 

Pastors need to prioritize family over  the church and the church they are pastoring needs to have that understanding cemented in their minds when they vote a pastor in.

 

There's this expectation  that when a church hires a pastor they are also getting his wife for free.  This is especially true if she is talented musically or if she's good with office stuff.  She's expected to be on this committee or that simply by virtue of being married to the pastor.  My husband made it very clear that when he was hired, the church was not getting a two-for-one deal and that his wife was no more obligated to do things in the church than any other member.  And he's very protective of his famliy time, as well.  I smiled when I read your funeral example, shiloh, because that's happened to us twice!  A funeral is the one thing that Mike will cut short a vacation or change plans to take care of, if at all possible.  



#7
GoldenEagle

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Consider the full difference between how the thought process works in three financial categories of life: poverty, middle class and rich.  The key is to understand the differences.  A person may be middle class in wealth, but still maintains the through process of someone in poverty making it hard for them to advance out of that train of thought, if, in fact, they want to advance to how the middle class thinks.

 

Bridges out of Poverty and Getting Ahead in a just getting by World are two great classes to take and understand.  Without knowing how the thought process works within the developed groups, a discussion like this can only cause more issues.

Good resources brother. I will check them out.

I really do think it boils down to how/what a person thinks, says, and acts in a given circumstance. Better yet it's the 90/10 principle. The 90% is a person's attitude the 10% is what actually happens to the person that they really have no control over.

One person we'll call Kyle put it this way:
 

Kyle
I think people are where they are because of 90% the choices they've made, and 10% things that happened to them that they couldn't control.

If you marry the wrong guy, have a couple kids you can't afford, and choose cigarettes and alcohol over networking and self-improvement, you're going to be poor. It sure is a lot easier to blame the government, or an injury from a car crash than it is to admit that you could have worked a little harder and improved your situation.

Some people make bad decisions but still end up OK due to the 10% of things that happened to them beyond their control (such as being born white, a male, or to good parents). Some people make all the right decisions but end up poor due to those same 10% of things they couldn't control (born in the wrong country, diagnosed with cancer, whatever). But by and large, in the majority of cases, I think the 90% that is choices people make outweigh the 10% things that just "happen" to them. It's all in how you react to those 10% that determines where you'll end up. You can use them as an excuse/scapegoat for your {lousy} situation, or you can choose to succeed in spite if them.

 

 

 

God bless,

GE



#8
GoldenEagle

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I guess a distinction should first be made between absolute and relative poverty. As I understand it absolute poverty can be defined as when there is a lack of minimum food and shelter necessary for living. As I understand it relative poverty can be defined as those who live in a country that lack what is needed by most citizens to live in a decent manner because they earn less than half the country’s median income. Half the U.S.A's median income at $51,017 in 2012 is a little unrealistic. Interestingly enough "Asians had the highest household income ($68,600), followed by Whites ($57,000), Hispanics ($39,000) and Blacks ($33,300)." For the sake of discussion we could the U.S. 2010 figures that define poverty as "Those making $23,492 a year for a family of four, or $11,720 for an individual were considered to be living in poverty."  See this resource.

I believe when we talk about poverty in N. America for the most part the discussion is a form of relative poverty. In India, Southeast Asia, and many countries in Africa for example there are people who have no basics such as resources food, water, shelter and live in absolute poverty.


God bless,

GE
 



#9
GoldenEagle

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One reason that pastors end up with rebellious children is that their churches make huge demands of their time and expect their family needs to take precedence over the needs of their pastor's family.   I cannot tell you the number of stories I have heard of how pastors were expected to cancel family vacations at te last minute for funerals.  Some kids resent churches for taking their fathers away from them.

 

Pastors need to be more bold in protecting their family time, and they need to have contingencies in place so that if a funeral does come up there is someone to stand in and families need to understand that they cannot demand that only the pastor officiate their funeral.

 

Pastors need to prioritize family over  the church and the church they are pastoring needs to have that understanding cemented in their minds when they vote a pastor in.

 

I agree with you in bold. :thumbsup:
 

As a PK (preacher's kid) my experience for the most part was a bit different than what you described brother. From the time I was 8-12 my father had a very stresful job where he travelled preaching in congregations and encouraging other pastors in the state. He had to take a step back and cut down to prioritize his family.

After that things really improved in both my parents marriage, our family, and my father's ministry. He would always take a full day off on Mondays. Unless it was an emergency or there were serious issues others in the church were to be contacted. We let the phones go to voicemail.

Also, during meals nobody answered the phones and we made it a point to all sit together around the table. We didn't watch TV during meals either for the most part.

 

We also had "family worship" 2-3 times (as we got older is was once or twice...) a week where we read a Bible story, sang some hyms/praise songs, talked, shared prayer requests, and prayed together. As a younger kid I really didn't like it too much. As a teenager I may have resented it at times. But for the most part I look back now with fond memories of those times. It was a time to be real together, learn together, laugh together, sing together, cry together, and pray together.

 

It was at that point too that my parents started having their "quiet times" every night together. And they also prayed together each night.

One thing I think is that there is a huge temptation for pastors to end up prioritizing their ministry over their family. The consequences to the family can be devastating.

 

Does this make sense?

 

As the saying goes "A family that prays together tends to stay together." :clap: 
 

God bless,

GE



#10
GoldenEagle

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Excellent article.  Point #2, though, is not worded correctly, unless the author was trying to be deliberately provocative.  Selfishness is never vitruous, and to be honest, I have found those who think they are poor to be the most selfish.  I say think, because a lot of people have this weird "poverty mentality," that causes them to see themselves as poor when they are, in fact, not.  The better choice instead of seflishness would be "rational self-interest," because that is what this describes:

 

If you're not taking care of you, you're not in a position to help anyone else. You can't give what you don't have.

 

 

And shiloh is 100% correct in what he wrote re: pastors:

 

 

Pastors need to prioritize family over  the church and the church they are pastoring needs to have that understanding cemented in their minds when they vote a pastor in.

 

There's this expectation  that when a church hires a pastor they are also getting his wife for free.  This is especially true if she is talented musically or if she's good with office stuff.  She's expected to be on this committee or that simply by virtue of being married to the pastor.  My husband made it very clear that when he was hired, the church was not getting a two-for-one deal and that his wife was no more obligated to do things in the church than any other member.  And he's very protective of his famliy time, as well.  I smiled when I read your funeral example, shiloh, because that's happened to us twice!  A funeral is the one thing that Mike will cut short a vacation or change plans to take care of, if at all possible.  

 

I agree and I think too the #2 is really worded wrong. Rational self-interest is probably a better term. I think the gist is if you're not taking care of yourself and your family how can you expect to help others? For example if a person is in a huge amount of debt they don't have income freed up to be generous unless they want to fall further behind on their bills. Is this kind of what you're talking about?

"If you're not taking care of you, you're not in a position to help anyone else. You can't give what you don't have."

 

I agree too here about the whole pastor's wife thing. My mother was one of those that played the paino, etc. As church planters though this really came in handy. Yet, the expectation was always that my mother was a volunteer and not a staff member.

Funerals, grief, loss are tricky things. Handle with prayer. :thumbsup:

God bless,

GE



#11
Butero

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With regard to point #2, I think there needs to be a line drawn between selfishness and self-care    You cannot help others if your needs and the needs of your family haven't been met and I think it is a biblical virtue to look after one's family first before attempting to look after others.

 

This is a really good and informative article.  Thanks for posting it.

I agree with Shiloh.  I am not sure I necessarily agree with every point being the difference between the rich and poor, but I don't dismiss any of it.  There is a lot to consider there, and like Shiloh, I found it informative and thank you for posting it. 



#12
bopeep1909

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With all the discussion about minimum wage increases, redistribution, healthcare, etc. I thought this was intersting...

Habbits, choices, etc. have a lot to do with peeple's personal financial situation. So came across this article today figured I'd get some input and start a discussion...

 

21 Ways Rich People Think Differently
 
By Mandi Woodruff | Business Insider – Tue, Sep 4, 2012 10:50 AM EDT
 
World's richest woman Gina Rinehart is enduring a media firestorm over an article in which she takes the "jealous" middle class to task for "drinking, or smoking and socializing" rather than working to earn their own fortune.

What if she has a point?

Steve Siebold, author of "How Rich People Think," spent nearly three decades interviewing millionaires around the world to find out what separates them from everyone else.

It had little to do with money itself, he told Business Insider. It was about their mentality.

"[The middle class] tells people to be happy with what they have," he said. "And on the whole, most people are steeped in fear when it comes to money."

1. Average people think MONEY is the root of all evil. Rich people believe POVERTY is the root of all evil.

....

 
We know the Bible says that the love of money is the root of all evil. (1 Tim. 6:10) Yet do we think like rich or poor people? From a Christian Perspective how do we approach this type of thinking? Do you agree or disagree with the above?

God bless,

GE
 

Tell me what this article considers "average".You have your poor,you have your middle class,your have your upper middle class and you have your wealthy   :noidea: Their is so much greed in our world right now it is very,very sad.And that might not only be among the very weathy.



#13
alphaparticle

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22. Rich people don't make lists of how rich people think.



#14
GoldenEagle

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22. Rich people don't make lists of how rich people think.

 

LOL. :thumbsup:

For perspective... One person said the following about this article:

"Steve Siebold interviewed 50 millionaires to come up with that book and turned it into a PowerPoint series with about 100 points.

Mandi Woodruff took 21 of those points and turned it into an article for Business Insider so she could get a paycheck."



#15
GoldenEagle

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Tell me what this article considers "average".You have your poor,you have your middle class,your have your upper middle class and you have your wealthy   :noidea: Their is so much greed in our world right now it is very,very sad.And that might not only be among the very weathy.

 

 

I honestly don't know what the article considers "average". Perhaps it's a generalization that really is simply an attempt at a formula to say how one should behave to acquire and keep wealth. Those who are poor were defined above as the 15% of the U.S. population of "Those making $23,492 a year for a family of four, or $11,720 for an individual were considered to be living in poverty."

The median income in 2012 was $51,017. Of course this varies by state. So assuming that the top 10% of the U.S. population would be considered wealthy that leave the remaining 75% of the population. If I were to guess I'd say that would mean citizens who make between $14,000 and $140,000 a year. This link would probably support those figures percentage wise.
 

I think too there is the idea of gnosticism (simple definition: physical world is bad, spiritual world is good) regarding money that is prevalent amongst some Believers today. Wealth isn't evil. The love of money is.



#16
alphaparticle

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Yeah man, I should have added the proviso: unless they are making their money by making such lists ;)



#17
MrsRational

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Not all rich people are selfish, not all poor people are victims of society.



#18
other one

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Not all rich people are selfish, not all poor people are victims of society.

I know poor people who are just simply lazy...      and they seem to be happy       go figure.



#19
GoldenEagle

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Not all rich people are selfish, not all poor people are victims of society.

Do you think that the article implied this? I don't really understand this comment.



#20
GoldenEagle

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Not all rich people are selfish, not all poor people are victims of society.

I know poor people who are just simply lazy...      and they seem to be happy       go figure.

 

 

We've worked with those in more dire situations. It's really sad when we've offered to help some homeless folks and they simply didn't want to change their lifestyles and habits in order to have a better standard of living. It's very sad to me in many ways.






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