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Blackcurrants

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To all Americans.... is it true? you have none.

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It's my understanding that they OK'd the growing of them in New York in 2003.   Originally about a hundred years ago we thought it was passing some white pine disease from some German imports to our white pine forests and they were banned....   for about 100 years.

 

Since 2003 if my memory serves me we now grow them  at least in two or three states.....   I'm personally not fond of them...

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It's my understanding that they OK'd the growing of them in New York in 2003.   Originally about a hundred years ago we thought it was passing some white pine disease from some German imports to our white pine forests and they were banned....   for about 100 years.

 

Since 2003 if my memory serves me we now grow them  at least in two or three states.....   I'm personally not fond of them...

 

Not my favourite flavour either. I bought a blackcurrant drink today because they had run out of orange, strawberry and all the other flavours that I prefer. Blackcurrant is okay, but second rate to me. They seem to be a big thing over here though, but I'm not really a fan.

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I think we are mostly growing them to export to Europe until they can rebuild a market here.

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Blessings Oak...

    I remember talk about them crossing them with something to produce a more disease resistant strain & I don't remember what they are called & I have no idea where (if at all)they are grown in the USA..................I do remember the white pine rust & gall mites as other one said & they were banned

     I do not like the juice at all but I had some jam I liked

                                                                                                                                                                      With love-in Christ,Kwik

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Blessings Oak...

    I remember talk about them crossing them with something to produce a more disease resistant strain & I don't remember what they are called & I have no idea where (if at all)they are grown in the USA..................I do remember the white pine rust & gall mites as other one said & they were banned

     I do not like the juice at all but I had some jam I liked

                                                                                                                                                                      With love-in Christ,Kwik

 

I have to admit, they are better in jam than they are to drink as a juice.

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What are they?A berry?

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What are they?A berry?

 

yes, similar in appearance as blue berries

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Blessings BoPeep......Here you go(found this on Wikipedia,there is actually much more.......)

Blackcurrant

The blackcurrant (Ribes nigrum) is a woody shrub in the family Grossulariaceae grown for its piquant berries. It is native to temperate parts of central and northern Europe and northern Asia where it prefers damp fertile soils and is widely cultivated both commercially and domestically. It is winter hardy but cold weather at flowering time during the spring reduces the size of the crop. Bunches of small, glossy black fruit develop along the stems in the summer and can be harvested by hand or by machine. The fruit is rich in vitamin C, various other nutrients, phytochemicals and antioxidants. Blackcurrants can be eaten raw but are usually cooked in a variety of sweet or savoury dishes. They are used to make jams, jellies and syrups and are grown commercially for the juice market. The fruit is also used in the preparation of alcoholic beverages and both fruit and foliage have uses in traditional medicine and the preparation of dyes.

As a crop, the blackcurrant suffers from several pests and diseases. The most serious disease is reversion, caused by a virus transmitted by the blackcurrant gall mite. Another is white pine blister rust which requires two alternating hosts, the blackcurrant and certain coniferous trees. This fungus caused damage to forests when the fruit was first introduced into North America. As a result, the blackcurrant has been subject to restrictions in the United States as a disease vector for most of the 20th century. Breeding is being undertaken in Europe and New Zealand to produce fruit with better eating qualities and bushes with greater hardiness and disease resistance.

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Blessings BoPeep......Here you go(found this on Wikipedia,there is actually much more.......)

Blackcurrant

The blackcurrant (Ribes nigrum) is a woody shrub in the family Grossulariaceae grown for its piquant berries. It is native to temperate parts of central and northern Europe and northern Asia where it prefers damp fertile soils and is widely cultivated both commercially and domestically. It is winter hardy but cold weather at flowering time during the spring reduces the size of the crop. Bunches of small, glossy black fruit develop along the stems in the summer and can be harvested by hand or by machine. The fruit is rich in vitamin C, various other nutrients, phytochemicals and antioxidants. Blackcurrants can be eaten raw but are usually cooked in a variety of sweet or savoury dishes. They are used to make jams, jellies and syrups and are grown commercially for the juice market. The fruit is also used in the preparation of alcoholic beverages and both fruit and foliage have uses in traditional medicine and the preparation of dyes.

As a crop, the blackcurrant suffers from several pests and diseases. The most serious disease is reversion, caused by a virus transmitted by the blackcurrant gall mite. Another is white pine blister rust which requires two alternating hosts, the blackcurrant and certain coniferous trees. This fungus caused damage to forests when the fruit was first introduced into North America. As a result, the blackcurrant has been subject to restrictions in the United States as a disease vector for most of the 20th century. Breeding is being undertaken in Europe and New Zealand to produce fruit with better eating qualities and bushes with greater hardiness and disease resistance.

Oh thanks kwik.Now I really know what a blackcurrant is :mgcheerful:

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