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Wow nearly 15 inches of snow the day after tax day!

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15 replies to this topic

#1
19Duggarfan

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Yea, so we have had a real bad winter, and yesterday we got nailed by 14 and a half inches of snow.  Does anyone know if the continental United States' winter is ever going to end this year?  If you are living here in the US, and praying for snow please, pretty pretty please Stop! :help:



#2
OakWood

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Must be caused by Global warming. :shades_smile:



#3
19Duggarfan

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Will what ever it is I hope it ends sometime soon.



#4
OakWood

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I was being sarcastic by the way.



#5
19Duggarfan

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Yea I though so Oakwood; but unfortunately for me for some strange reason they never plow my road, till after the snowstorm, but this time they did so I could get to work that night; could not even enjoy being snowed in.



#6
MorningGlory

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This is just weird...... :happyhappy: 



#7
gray wolf

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Yes, actually it is the result of global warming.



#8
OldSchool2

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Yes, actually it is the result of global warming.


If so-called global warming results in the worse winter in memory for myself and my fellow New Englanders, does global cooling bring an early spring?

#9
gray wolf

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I don't know. Must find the appropriate model!  As a side note, my friend in Berlin told me they had one of the mildest winters ever.  I feel so sorry for him!



#10
OldSchool2

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I don't know. Must find the appropriate model!  As a side note, my friend in Berlin told me they had one of the mildest winters ever.  I feel so sorry for him!


I think too many "scientists" shop for models that fit their expectations, but Easter is finally here and the snow is gone.

Hallelujah.

#11
gray wolf

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I guess it would hinge on what the expectations are. Great Expectations demand the most rigorous, my dear Pip.

#12
OldSchool2

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I guess it would hinge on what the expectations are. Great Expectations demand the most rigorous, my dear Pip.


So Dickens has become the new model for Anthropoid Global Warming?

#13
nebula

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Yea, so we have had a real bad winter, and yesterday we got nailed by 14 and a half inches of snow.  Does anyone know if the continental United States' winter is ever going to end this year?  If you are living here in the US, and praying for snow please, pretty pretty please Stop! :help:

 

The only think I know of is one of the books in the Little House series by Laura Ingalls Wilder called The Long Winter.

 

 

Allusions/references to actual history, geography and current science[edit]

 

Wilder was, by her own admission, a writer of historical fiction. Most of the people, places and events she describes are actually from her own life, but she sometimes juxtaposed events and compressed characters in the interest of good storytelling.[citation needed] The Long Winter, however, contains far less fiction than her other books; it is, for the most part, an accurate description of that winter in De Smet.[citation needed] The Long Winter runs from the fall of 1880 to the spring of 1881, a season of such frequent blizzards that it went down in history as "The Snow Winter".[1] Accurate details in Wilder's novel include the names of the townspeople (with only minor exceptions), the blizzards' frequency and the deep cold, the Chicago and North Western Railway stopping trains until the spring thaw when the snow made the tracks impassable, the near-starvation of the townspeople, and the courage of Almanzo Wilder and Cap Garland, who ventured out on the open prairie in search of a cache of wheat that no one was even sure existed.

 

The fictionalized material includes the "Indian warning" in an early chapter and the duration and frequency of blizzards. While historical records indicate a larger than usual number of blizzards that winter, Laura's description of storms lasting on average three days each, with only two to two-and-a-half days separation, from late October until early April, would imply about 35 separate blizzards during that time frame, which may be dramatic license. Local oral history and research by Ingalls' biographers also indicate that Wilder and Garland traveled about 12 miles south of De Smet to find the wheat, not 20 as she states in the book. Almanzo Wilder is portrayed as being roughly six years older than Laura, when he was in fact ten years older. Aside from these minor variations, however, the book is an accurate portrayal of that legendary winter in Dakota Territory.

 

http://en.wikipedia...._Winter_(novel)



#14
OldSchool2

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1816 - The Year Without Summer

By: Lee Foster, Meteorologist

"As we all know living in New England means enduring long winters and savoring the short summers. However, in 1816, the summer season was shorter than normal and is commonly referred to as 'The Year Without Summer'. I first heard about this infamous summer from my grandfather who lived his entire life in Northern New Hampshire. He was not alive in 1816 but stories of that summer were passed down from generation to generation ..."

http://www.erh.noaa....utsummer_lf.htm

#15
FresnoJoe

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The year 1816 is known as the Year Without a Summer (also known as the Poverty Year, The Summer that Never Was, Year There Was No Summer, and Eighteen Hundred and Froze to Death,

 

because of severe summer climate abnormalities that caused average global temperatures to decrease by 0.4–0.7 °C (0.7–1.3 °F),.

 

This resulted in major food shortages across the Northern Hemisphere.

 

Evidence suggests that the anomaly was caused by a combination of a historic low in solar activity with a volcanic winter event,

 

the latter caused by a succession of major volcanic eruptions capped by the 1815 eruption of Mount Tambora, in the Dutch East Indies (Indonesia), the largest known eruption in over 1,300 years.

 

The Little Ice Age, then in its concluding decades, may also have been a factor. http://en.wikipedia....ithout_a_Summer



#16
Willa

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We lived in Oregon from Labor Day of '63 to May . Snow arrived 2 weeks after we did and we left right after the snow did. On the west side of our little house it drifted up to the eaves. It was not unusual to get high centered in a snow drift and have to wait for a road grader/plow to arrive. Every few weeks we would travel through a mountain pass in which was carved a road with10 foot banks of snow on each side--a white gully. We only knew where we were when we reached the top because the road was more recently plowed on that side. On the southeast side we pushed 6" of snow climbing 4,000 feet in our tiny foreign car at night. Often our temperatures were lower than the national lowest in International Falls MN. It hurt to breathe when it was 20 below 0 during the day. Our house stayed in the low 50s except within 6 feet of our oil stove heater which was strategicly placed between the sink and the toilet.

Our climate warmed after Mt. St. Helens blew. I believe that she and other ash blowing volcanos are responsible for the emissions that have caused global warming since the 80s. But there should also be a cooling that balances the effect. There isn't much we can do about that.
People can control smog and do much to control polution in the rivers and oceans, especially in China.
The growth of the Sahara is worrysome, since it is responsible for the hurricanes that blast our south and east coasts. And I understand that some of that is do to wars and purposful destruction of habitat, which also produces famine and pushes people into temporary shelters away from their homes as well as much atrocities and suffering.
As much as we might want to remain detatched from the conflicts and problems in other nations, we are all dependant somewhat on each other in some way. And while I am not a liberal or an animist, all of humanity does bear some responsibility to preserve the habitat for future generations till Jesus comes.




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