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Memorial day and this weekend.

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#1
ncn

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This week end, "Memorial Day" in the USA is celebrated.

It falls on Monday 26th May.
 

Memorial day is not just parades and BBQs; it's something far deeper.

Many use this time to visit cemeteries and graves of those fallen during military service.
A time to remember those that gave their life so that others may live in a safer environment.

As a veteran from the United Kingdom I extend my prayers to all those families that have lost a member/members of their family during a conflict or while serving.

This weekend and on Memorial Day offers us all regardless of nationality, an opportunity to thank all those that are still serving their country.
To also ponder the enormous sacrifice that families make when a loved one is far from home.

From across the pond, "We will remember you".
 

God Bless all those that serve in the Armed Forces of the USA across the globe.

 

Lets us also remember all the nurse that care for disabled Veterans .

The doctors and the nurses and all the palliative teams that support them in their homes. 

Love Nigel.



#2
Willamina

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Amen!

#3
OakWood

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Amen.



#4
gamnot

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Amen

 

Eternal Father, strong to save - Whose arm hath bound the restless waves,

Who bid'est the mighty ocean deep, it's own appointed limits keep.

 

O' hear us when we cry to thee - For those in peril on the sea.

 

O' Christ the voice the waters heard - and hushed their raging at Thy word,

who walked upon the foaming deep, and calm amid it's rage dids't sleep.

 

O' hear us when we cry to Thee - For those in peril on the sea.

 

Most Holy Spirit who did'st brood - over the chaos dark and rude,

Who bids't the angry tumult seize and gives for wild confusion peace.

 

O' hear us when we cry to Thee - For those in peril on the sea.

 

O' Trinity of love and power - our brethren's shield in danger's hour

From rock and tempest fire and foe - protect them where-so-ever they go.

 

Thus evermore shall rise to Thee, Glad hymns of praise from land and sea.



#5
Logan

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John 15:13 Greater love has no man than this, that he lay down his life for his friend.

 

Never forget the sacrifices others made for the freedom we have everyday.

To all veterans and all those currently serving, to all those who gave their lives in service and to all their families, it's never enough but thank you.



#6
FresnoJoe

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Amen~!



#7
OakWood

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I didn't realise that the U.S. had a different Memorial day to us. I thought we shared the same. Where does the custom come from having it on this day? Ours comes from the World War One Armistice.



#8
ncn

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I didn't realise that the U.S. had a different Memorial day to us. I thought we shared the same. Where does the custom come from having it on this day? Ours comes from the World War One Armistice.

 

If I am not mistaken Memorial day comes from the celebration of Decoration Day which after the American civil war;

was used to commemorate the Union and Confederate soldiers that died during the civil war. 

...................

 

"The preferred name for the holiday gradually changed from "Decoration Day" to "Memorial Day", which was first used in 1882.

 It did not become more common until after WWII and was not declared the official name by Federal law until 1967"

~Wiki.



#9
FresnoJoe

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I didn't realise that the U.S. had a different Memorial day to us. I thought we shared the same. Where does the custom come from having it on this day? Ours comes from the World War One Armistice.

 

:thumbsup:

 

Whereas the legislatures of twenty-seven of our States have already declared November 11 to be a legal holiday: Therefore be it Resolved by the Senate (the House of Representatives concurring), that the President of the United States is requested to issue a proclamation calling upon the officials to display the flag of the United States on all Government buildings on November 11 and inviting the people of the United States to observe the day in schools and churches, or other suitable places, with appropriate ceremonies of friendly relations with all other peoples.

 

An Act (52 Stat. 351; 5 U. S. Code, Sec. 87a) approved May 13, 1938, made the 11th of November in each year a legal holiday—a day to be dedicated to the cause of world peace and to be thereafter celebrated and known as "Armistice Day." Armistice Day was primarily a day set aside to honor veterans of World War I, but in 1954, after World War II had required the greatest mobilization of soldiers, sailors, Marines and airmen in the Nation’s history; after American forces had fought aggression in Korea, the 83rd Congress, at the urging of the veterans service organizations, amended the Act of 1938 by striking out the word "Armistice" and inserting in its place the word "Veterans." With the approval of this legislation (Public Law 380) on June 1, 1954, November 11th became a day to honor American veterans of all wars.

 

Later that same year, on October 8th, President Dwight D. Eisenhower issued the first "Veterans Day Proclamation" which stated: "In order to insure proper and widespread observance of this anniversary, all veterans, all veterans' organizations, and the entire citizenry will wish to join hands in the common purpose. Toward this end, I am designating the Administrator of Veterans' Affairs as Chairman of a Veterans Day National Committee, which shall include such other persons as the Chairman may select, and which will coordinate at the national level necessary planning for the observance. I am also requesting the heads of all departments and agencies of the Executive branch of the Government to assist the National Committee in every way possible."

 

..........

 

The Uniform Holiday Bill (Public Law 90-363 (82 Stat. 250)) was signed on June 28, 1968, and was intended to ensure three-day weekends for Federal employees by celebrating four national holidays on Mondays: Washington's Birthday, Memorial Day, Veterans Day, and Columbus Day. It was thought that these extended weekends would encourage travel, recreational and cultural activities and stimulate greater industrial and commercial production. Many states did not agree with this decision and continued to celebrate the holidays on their original dates.

 

The first Veterans Day under the new law was observed with much confusion on October 25, 1971. It was quite apparent that the commemoration of this day was a matter of historic and patriotic significance to a great number of our citizens, and so on September 20th, 1975, President Gerald R. Ford signed Public Law 94-97 (89 Stat. 479), which returned the annual observance of Veterans Day to its original date of November 11, beginning in 1978. This action supported the desires of the overwhelming majority of state legislatures, all major veterans service organizations and the American people.

 

Veterans Day continues to be observed on November 11, regardless of what day of the week on which it falls. The restoration of the observance of Veterans Day to November 11 not only preserves the historical significance of the date, but helps focus attention on the important purpose of Veterans Day: A celebration to honor America's veterans for their patriotism, love of country, and willingness to serve and sacrifice for the common good. http://www.va.gov/op...tdayhistory.asp



#10
OakWood

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Thanks, Nigel and Joe.



#11
kwikphilly

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Blessings ncn

     Thank you for you heartfelt sentiments but most of all for your service to defend freedom, liberty & world peace........

 

British–American relations, also referred to as Anglo-American relations, encompass many complex relations ranging from two early wars to competition for world markets. Since 1940 they have been close military allies enjoying a "special relationship" built as wartime allies, and NATO partners.

The two nations are bound together by shared history, an overlap in religion and a common language and legal system, and kinship ties that reach back hundreds of years, including kindred, ancestral lines among English Americans, Scottish Americans, Welsh Americans, and Scotch-Irish Americans. Today large numbers of expatriates live in the other country.

Through times of war and rebellion, peace and estrangement, as well as becoming friends and allies, Britain and the US cemented these deeply rooted links during World War II into what is known as the "Special Relationship", described in 2009 by British political commentator Christiane Amanpour as "the key trans-Atlantic alliance",[1] which the U.S. Senate Chair on European Affairs acknowledged in 2010 as "one of the cornerstones of stability around the world."[2]

    This Memorial Day let us pray for all the families & loved ones of the brave men & women not only in the US but in the UK as well and the other countries that stand side by side with us for the same cause..................in God we Trust!And a very special "thank you" for anyone who is or has served in the Military to protect their countrymen,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,all Nations under God

                                                                                                                             With love-in Christ,Kwik



#12
Salty

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This week end, "Memorial Day" in the USA is celebrated.

It falls on Monday 26th May.
 

Memorial day is not just parades and BBQs; it's something far deeper.

Many use this time to visit cemeteries and graves of those fallen during military service.
A time to remember those that gave their life so that others may live in a safer environment.

As a veteran from the United Kingdom I extend my prayers to all those families that have lost a member/members of their family during a conflict or while serving.

This weekend and on Memorial Day offers us all regardless of nationality, an opportunity to thank all those that are still serving their country.
To also ponder the enormous sacrifice that families make when a loved one is far from home.

From across the pond, "We will remember you".
 

God Bless all those that serve in the Armed Forces of the USA across the globe.

 

Lets us also remember all the nurse that care for disabled Veterans .

The doctors and the nurses and all the palliative teams that support them in their homes. 

Love Nigel.

 

Thank you, thank you, and may God bless!



#13
FresnoJoe

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Thanks, Nigel and Joe.

 

:thumbsup:

 

Memorial Day History

 

Three years after the Civil War ended, on May 5, 1868, the head of an organization of Union veterans — the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) — established Decoration Day as a time for the nation to decorate the graves of the war dead with flowers. Maj. Gen. John A. Logan declared that Decoration Day should be observed on May 30. It is believed that date was chosen because flowers would be in bloom all over the country.

 

The first large observance was held that year at Arlington National Cemetery, across the Potomac River from Washington, D.C.

 

The ceremonies centered around the mourning-draped veranda of the Arlington mansion, once the home of Gen. Robert E. Lee. Various Washington officials, including Gen. and Mrs. Ulysses S. Grant, presided over the ceremonies. After speeches, children from the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Orphan Home and members of the GAR made their way through the cemetery, strewing flowers on both Union and Confederate graves, reciting prayers and singing hymns.

 

Local Observances Claim To Be First Local springtime tributes to the Civil War dead already had been held in various places. One of the first occurred in Columbus, Miss., April 25, 1866, when a group of women visited a cemetery to decorate the graves of Confederate soldiers who had fallen in battle at Shiloh. Nearby were the graves of Union soldiers, neglected because they were the enemy. Disturbed at the sight of the bare graves, the women placed some of their flowers on those graves, as well.

 

Today, cities in the North and the South claim to be the birthplace of Memorial Day in 1866. Both Macon and Columbus, Ga., claim the title, as well as Richmond, Va. The village of Boalsburg, Pa., claims it began there two years earlier. A stone in a Carbondale, Ill., cemetery carries the statement that the first Decoration Day ceremony took place there on April 29, 1866. Carbondale was the wartime home of Gen. Logan. Approximately 25 places have been named in connection with the origin of Memorial Day, many of them in the South where most of the war dead were buried.

 

Official Birthplace Declared In 1966, Congress and President Lyndon Johnson declared Waterloo, N.Y., the “birthplace” of Memorial Day. There, a ceremony on May 5, 1866, honored local veterans who had fought in the Civil War. Businesses closed and residents flew flags at half-staff. Supporters of Waterloo’s claim say earlier observances in other places were either informal, not community-wide or one-time events.

 

By the end of the 19th century, Memorial Day ceremonies were being held on May 30 throughout the nation. State legislatures passed proclamations designating the day, and the Army and Navy adopted regulations for proper observance at their facilities.

 

It was not until after World War I, however, that the day was expanded to honor those who have died in all American wars. In 1971, Memorial Day was declared a national holiday by an act of Congress, though it is still often called Decoration Day. It was then also placed on the last Monday in May, as were some other federal holidays.

 

Some States Have Confederate Observances Many Southern states also have their own days for honoring the Confederate dead. Mississippi celebrates Confederate Memorial Day on the last Monday of April, Alabama on the fourth Monday of April, and Georgia on April 26. North and South Carolina observe it on May 10, Louisiana on June 3 and Tennessee calls that date Confederate Decoration Day. Texas celebrates Confederate Heroes Day January 19 and Virginia calls the last Monday in May Confederate Memorial Day.

 

Gen. Logan’s order for his posts to decorate graves in 1868 “with the choicest flowers of springtime” urged: “We should guard their graves with sacred vigilance. ... Let pleasant paths invite the coming and going of reverent visitors and fond mourners. Let no neglect, no ravages of time, testify to the present or to the coming generations that we have forgotten as a people the cost of a free and undivided republic.”

 

The crowd attending the first Memorial Day ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery was approximately the same size as those that attend today’s observance, about 5,000 people. Then, as now, small American flags were placed on each grave — a tradition followed at many national cemeteries today. In recent years, the custom has grown in many families to decorate the graves of all departed loved ones.

 

The origins of special services to honor those who die in war can be found in antiquity. The Athenian leader Pericles offered a tribute to the fallen heroes of the Peloponnesian War over 24 centuries ago that could be applied today to the 1.1 million Americans who have died in the nation’s wars: “Not only are they commemorated by columns and inscriptions, but there dwells also an unwritten memorial of them, graven not on stone but in the hearts of men.”

 

To ensure the sacrifices of America ’s fallen heroes are never forgotten, in December 2000, the U.S. Congress passed and the president signed into law “The National Moment of Remembrance Act,” P.L. 106-579, creating the White House Commission on the National Moment of Remembrance. The commission’s charter is to “encourage the people of the United States to give something back to their country, which provides them so much freedom and opportunity” by encouraging and coordinating commemorations in the United States of Memorial Day and the National Moment of Remembrance.

 

The National Moment of Remembrance encourages all Americans to pause wherever they are at 3 p.m. local time on Memorial Day for a minute of silence to remember and honor those who have died in service to the nation. As Moment of Remembrance founder Carmella LaSpada states: “It’s a way we can all help put the memorial back in Memorial Day.” http://www.va.gov/op...ut Memorial Day






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