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Who should we call father

* * * * * 1 votes Priest being called father

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#1
tigger398

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Does anyone ever feel funny calling a priest father. When I hear people calling a priest father I feel like it's disrespecting God.



#2
Hippie333

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I personally, will not do it.  Mat 23:9  And call no man your father upon the earth: for one is your Father, which is in heaven.

 

Christian's are equal....only God has supreme authority. Only God  has a right to give laws; to declare doctrines that shall bind the conscience; to punish disobedience. Christ taught us all  that the source of all life and truth was God, and that we should not to seek or receive a title which properly belongs to him. This of course, does not mean not to call our parents father / mother....in the parental sense....that is accepted and used in scripture.
 

Exo 20:12  Honour thy father and thy mother: that thy days may be long upon the land which the LORD thy God giveth thee.

Mat 15:4  For God commanded, saying, Honour thy father and mother: and, He that curseth father or mother, let him die the death.
 

Commentary on Matthew 23:9 - (source Gills Commentary)

Not but that children may, and should call their natural parents, fathers; and such who have been instrumental in the conversion of souls, may be rightly called by them their spiritual fathers; as servants and scholars also, may call those that are over them, and instruct them, their masters: our Lord does not mean, by any of these expressions, to set aside all names and titles, of natural and civil distinction among men, but only to reject all such names and titles, as are used to signify an authoritative power over men's consciences, in matters of faith and obedience; in which, God and Christ are only to be attended to.

 

God Bless,

Hip



#3
enoob57

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It is the escape from second death by second birth and the reality- it was The Father
that sent The Son by The Fathers Will... securely adopting us Through The Son as sons.
Mark 14:36
36 And he said, Abba, Father, all things are possible unto thee; take away this cup
from me: nevertheless not what I will, but what thou wilt.
KJV
Romans 8:15
15 For ye have not received the spirit of bondage again to fear; but ye have received
the Spirit of adoption, whereby we cry, Abba, Father.
KJV
Galatians 4:6
6 And because ye are sons, God hath sent forth the Spirit of his Son into your hearts,
crying, Abba, Father.
KJV

Anything else would be a travesty to the gift of The Father... Love, Steven

#4
OakWood

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God I call Father and my Dad..... that's it.



#5
kwikphilly

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Blessings tigger

     Praise the Lord!!!!Yes,I have a problem with it because the Word of God tells us specifically ,not to

 

Mat 23:9  And call no man your father upon the earth: for one is your Father, which is in heaven.                                              KJV

   .God is my Father.I used to refer to my Dad as my father but I always called my earthly father 'Daddy".......but priests,yeah-I don't like it at all .   I kind of cringe when  hear it,I also feel as you do,that it is irreverant to our Heavenly Father 

      This is probably stupid because I will call upon God as "Abba"(which means Daddy really) but  have a friend that refers to God as "Daddy" & it drives me nuts,I just feel that it is not respectful enough to ALMIGHTY GOD!!!!.....I don't say anything ,she is a very good friend of mine & she does know how I feel and I know how she is passionate for our Lord but I just don't like it.Hey,I even cringe when I see God spelled with a small "g" ,LOL,or satan spelled with a capital "S"(just my 2 cents)

                                                                                                                                                           With love-in Christ ,Kwik



#6
coheir

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Blessings tigger

     Praise the Lord!!!!Yes,I have a problem with it because the Word of God tells us specifically ,not to

 

Mat 23:9  And call no man your father upon the earth: for one is your Father, which is in heaven.                                              KJV

   .God is my Father.I used to refer to my Dad as my father but I always called my earthly father 'Daddy".......but priests,yeah-I don't like it at all .   I kind of cringe when  hear it,I also feel as you do,that it is irreverant to our Heavenly Father 

      This is probably stupid because I will call upon God as "Abba"(which means Daddy really) but  have a friend that refers to God as "Daddy" & it drives me nuts,I just feel that it is not respectful enough to ALMIGHTY GOD!!!!.....I don't say anything ,she is a very good friend of mine & she does know how I feel and I know how she is passionate for our Lord but I just don't like it.Hey,I even cringe when I see God spelled with a small "g" ,LOL,or satan spelled with a capital "S"(just my 2 cents)

                                                                                                                                                           With love-in Christ ,Kwik

mat 23:9  tells me I have one Father also known as God the Father.

It does not say I have a Dad or Daddy named God. It also does not say I have a husband named God.

On earth I have a Dad or Daddy; in Heaven I have the one and only Father.



#7
FresnoJoe

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My Father

 

And because ye are sons, God hath sent forth the Spirit of his Son into your hearts, crying, Abba, Father. Galatians 4:6



#8
Johnlove

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One time a Catholic priest told me I was reading scripture wrong when I refused to call him father.  My response was that he could be right, but I would ask Jesus who was right.

Jesus told me that it was dangerous to be called father, and to call another father.



#9
B3L13v3R

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Hi Tigger398 :)

I would never call a priest "father," because of the same verse that Hippie333 mentioned:

Mat 23:9  And call no man your father (in the "God" The Father sense) upon the earth: for one is your Father, which is in heaven.

However, I have looked to faithfully reach out to a few Priest and many a Roman Catholic with the True Gospel over the years!
With the "Priest" on occasion, I have spent a few hours going over the Bible with them, as they present me at length with their man made religious liturgy.
I find them a tough crowd, but I'm always in hopes to see a few come to the knowledge of the Gospel, as represented solely in God's Word! :)



#10
tigger398

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You mean a priest don't know the gospel.



#11
FresnoJoe

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You mean a priest don't know the gospel.

 

:thumbsup:

 

And ye shall seek me, and find me, when ye shall search for me with all your heart. Jeremiah 29:13

 

 From Tradition to Truth

 

The Testimony of Former Roman Catholic Priest, Richard Bennett.

 

Trying to Earn Salvation

 

I left my family and friends in 1956 to join the Dominican Order. I spent eight years studying what it is to be a monk, the traditions of the Church, philosophy, the theology of Thomas Aquinas, and some of the Bible from a Catholic standpoint. Whatever personal faith I had was institutionalized and ritualized in the Dominican religious system. Obedience to the law, both Church and Dominican, was put before me as the means of sanctification. I often spoke to Ambrose Duffy, our Master of Students, about the law being the means of becoming holy. In addition to becoming “holy,” I wanted also to be sure of eternal salvation. I memorized part of the teaching of Pope Pius XII in which he said, “...the salvation of many depends on the prayers and sacrifices of the mystical body of Christ offered for this intention.” This idea of gaining salvation through suffering and prayer is also the basic message of Fatima and Lourdes, and I sought to win my own salvation as well as the salvation of others by such suffering and prayer. In the Dominican monastery in Tallaght, Dublin, I performed many difficult feats to win souls, such as taking cold showers in the middle of winter and beating my back with a small steel chain. The Master of Students knew what I was doing, his own austere life being part of the inspiration that I had received from the Pope's words. With rigor and determination, I studied, prayed, did penance, tried to keep the Ten Commandments and the multitude of Dominican rules and traditions.

 

Outward Pomp — Inner Emptiness

 

Then in 1963 at the age of twenty-five I was ordained a Roman Catholic priest and went on to finish my course of studies of Thomas Aquinas at The Angelicum University in Rome. But there I had difficulty with both the outward pomp and the inner emptiness. Over the years I had formed, from pictures and books, pictures in my mind of the Holy See and the Holy City. Could this be the same city? At the Angelicum University I was also shocked that hundreds of others who poured into our morning classes seemed quite disinterested in theology. I noticed Time and Newsweek magazines being read during classes. Those who were interested in what was being taught seemed only to be looking for either degrees or positions within the Catholic Church in their homelands. One day I went for a walk in the Colosseum so that my feet might tread the ground where the blood of so many Christians had been poured out. I walked to the arena in the Forum. I tried to picture in my mind those men and women who knew Christ so well that they were joyfully willing to be burned at the stake or devoured alive by beasts because of His overpowering love. The joy of this experience was marred, however, for as I went back in the bus I was insulted by jeering youths shouting words meaning “scum or garbage.” I sensed their motivation for such insults was not because I stood for Christ as the early Christians did but because they saw in me the Roman Catholic system. Quickly, I put this contrast out of my mind, yet what I had been taught about the present glories of Rome now seemed very irrelevant and empty. One night soon after that, I prayed for two hours in front of the main altar in the church of San Clemente. Remembering my earlier youthful call to be a missionary and the hundredfold promise of Mark 10:29-30, I decided not to take the theological degree that had been my ambition since beginning study of the theology of Thomas Aquinas. This was a major decision, but after long prayer I was sure I had decided correctly. The priest who was to direct my thesis did not want to accept my decision. In order to make the degree easier, he offered me a thesis written several years earlier. He said I could use it as my own if only I would do the oral defense. This turned my stomach. It was similar to what I had seen a few weeks earlier in a city park: elegant prostitutes parading themselves in their black leather boots. What he was offering was equally sinful. I held to my decision, finishing at the University at the ordinary academic level, without the degree. On returning from Rome, I received official word that I had been assigned to do a three year course at Cork University. I prayed earnestly about my missionary call. To my surprise, I received orders in late August 1964 to go to Trinidad, West Indies, as a missionary............

 

The Ultimate Question

 

First, I discovered that God's Word in the Bible is absolute and without error. I had been taught that the Word is relative and that its truthfulness in many areas was to be questioned. Now I began to understand that the Bible could, in fact, be trusted. With the aid of Strong's Concordance, I began to study the Bible to see what it says about itself. I discovered that the Bible teaches clearly that it is from God and is absolute in what it says. It is true in its history, in the promises God has made, in its prophecies, in the moral commands it gives, and in how to live the Christian life. “All scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness: That the man of God may be perfect, thoroughly furnished unto all good works” (II Timothy 3:16-17).

 

This discovery was made while visiting in Vancouver, B.C., and in Seattle. When I was asked to talk to the prayer group in St. Stephen's Catholic Church, I took as my subject the absolute authority of God's Word. It was the first time that I had understood such a truth or talked about it. I returned to Vancouver, B.C. and in a large parish Church, before about 400 people, I preached the same message. Bible in hand, I proclaimed that “the absolute and final authority in all matters of faith and morals is the Bible, God's own Word.”

 

Three days later, the archbishop of Vancouver, B.C., James Carney, called me to his office. I was then officially silenced and forbidden to preach in his archdiocese. I was told that my punishment would have been more severe, were it not for the letter of recommendation I had received from my own archbishop, Anthony Pantin. Soon afterwards I returned to Trinidad. http://www.bereanbea...testimony.html



#12
B3L13v3R

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Great testimony by 22 year former Roman Catholic Priest, Richard Bennett!

Thanks FresnoJoe! :)

Folks, please consider reading the entire article, well worth our time! :)

The crux of Richard Bennett's testimony from the link, underlined emphasis, mine:
 

------------------------------------------

"The Reason Why I Share

I share these truths with you now so that you can know God's way of salvation. Our basic problem as Catholics was that personal worth and dignity was ingrained into us. We believed that could respond to the help God gives us to be right in His sight. This presupposition that many of us have carried for years is aptly defined in the Catechism of the Catholic Church (1994) #2021, “Grace is the help God gives us to respond to our vocation of becoming his adopted sons....” With that mindset, we were unknowingly holding to a teaching that the Bible continually condemns. Such a definition of grace is man's careful fabrication, for the Bible consistently declares that the believer's right standing with God is “without works” (Romans 4:6), “without the deeds of the Law” (Romans 3:28), “not of works” (Ephesians 2:9), “It is the gift of God,” (Ephesians 2:8). To attempt to make the believer's response part of his salvation and to look upon grace as “a help” is to flatly deny biblical truth, “...if by grace, then is it no more of works: otherwise grace is no more grace...” (Romans 11:6).

 

The simple biblical message is that “the gift of righteousness” in Christ Jesus is a gift, resting on His all-sufficient sacrifice on the cross, “For if by one man’s offence death reigned by one; much more they which receive abundance of grace and of the gift of righteousness shall reign in life by one, Jesus Christ” (Romans 5:17). So it is as Christ Jesus Himself said, He died in place of the believer, the One for many (Mark 10:45), His life a ransom for many. As He declared, ...this is my blood of the new testament, which is shed for many for the remission of sins” (Matthew 26:28). This is also what Peter proclaimed, “For Christ also hath once suffered for sins, the just for the unjust, that He might bring us to God...” (I Peter 3:18). Paul’s preaching is summarized at the end of II Corinthians 5:21, “For he hath made him to be sin for us, who knew no sin; that we might be made the righteousness of God in him..” (II Corinthians 5:21)This fact, dear reader, is presented clearly to you in the Bible. Acceptance of it is now commanded by God, “...Repent ye, and believe the gospel” (Mark 1:15). The most difficult repentance for us dyed-in-the-wool Catholics is changing our mind from thoughts of “meriting,” “earning,” “being good enough,” simply to accepting with empty hands the gift of righteousness in Christ Jesus. To refuse to accept what God commands is the same sin as that of the religious Jews of Paul's time, “For they being ignorant of God’s righteousness, and going about to establish their own righteousness, have not submitted themselves unto the righteousness of God.” (Romans 10:3) Repent and believe the Good News!

Richard Bennett"



#13
Johnlove

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You mean a priest don't know the gospel.

 

:thumbsup:

 

And ye shall seek me, and find me, when ye shall search for me with all your heart. Jeremiah 29:13

 

 From Tradition to Truth

 

The Testimony of Former Roman Catholic Priest, Richard Bennett.

 

Trying to Earn Salvation

 

I left my family and friends in 1956 to join the Dominican Order. I spent eight years studying what it is to be a monk, the traditions of the Church, philosophy, the theology of Thomas Aquinas, and some of the Bible from a Catholic standpoint. Whatever personal faith I had was institutionalized and ritualized in the Dominican religious system. Obedience to the law, both Church and Dominican, was put before me as the means of sanctification. I often spoke to Ambrose Duffy, our Master of Students, about the law being the means of becoming holy. In addition to becoming “holy,” I wanted also to be sure of eternal salvation. I memorized part of the teaching of Pope Pius XII in which he said, “...the salvation of many depends on the prayers and sacrifices of the mystical body of Christ offered for this intention.” This idea of gaining salvation through suffering and prayer is also the basic message of Fatima and Lourdes, and I sought to win my own salvation as well as the salvation of others by such suffering and prayer. In the Dominican monastery in Tallaght, Dublin, I performed many difficult feats to win souls, such as taking cold showers in the middle of winter and beating my back with a small steel chain. The Master of Students knew what I was doing, his own austere life being part of the inspiration that I had received from the Pope's words. With rigor and determination, I studied, prayed, did penance, tried to keep the Ten Commandments and the multitude of Dominican rules and traditions.

 

Outward Pomp — Inner Emptiness

 

Then in 1963 at the age of twenty-five I was ordained a Roman Catholic priest and went on to finish my course of studies of Thomas Aquinas at The Angelicum University in Rome. But there I had difficulty with both the outward pomp and the inner emptiness. Over the years I had formed, from pictures and books, pictures in my mind of the Holy See and the Holy City. Could this be the same city? At the Angelicum University I was also shocked that hundreds of others who poured into our morning classes seemed quite disinterested in theology. I noticed Time and Newsweek magazines being read during classes. Those who were interested in what was being taught seemed only to be looking for either degrees or positions within the Catholic Church in their homelands. One day I went for a walk in the Colosseum so that my feet might tread the ground where the blood of so many Christians had been poured out. I walked to the arena in the Forum. I tried to picture in my mind those men and women who knew Christ so well that they were joyfully willing to be burned at the stake or devoured alive by beasts because of His overpowering love. The joy of this experience was marred, however, for as I went back in the bus I was insulted by jeering youths shouting words meaning “scum or garbage.” I sensed their motivation for such insults was not because I stood for Christ as the early Christians did but because they saw in me the Roman Catholic system. Quickly, I put this contrast out of my mind, yet what I had been taught about the present glories of Rome now seemed very irrelevant and empty. One night soon after that, I prayed for two hours in front of the main altar in the church of San Clemente. Remembering my earlier youthful call to be a missionary and the hundredfold promise of Mark 10:29-30, I decided not to take the theological degree that had been my ambition since beginning study of the theology of Thomas Aquinas. This was a major decision, but after long prayer I was sure I had decided correctly. The priest who was to direct my thesis did not want to accept my decision. In order to make the degree easier, he offered me a thesis written several years earlier. He said I could use it as my own if only I would do the oral defense. This turned my stomach. It was similar to what I had seen a few weeks earlier in a city park: elegant prostitutes parading themselves in their black leather boots. What he was offering was equally sinful. I held to my decision, finishing at the University at the ordinary academic level, without the degree. On returning from Rome, I received official word that I had been assigned to do a three year course at Cork University. I prayed earnestly about my missionary call. To my surprise, I received orders in late August 1964 to go to Trinidad, West Indies, as a missionary............

 

The Ultimate Question

 

First, I discovered that God's Word in the Bible is absolute and without error. I had been taught that the Word is relative and that its truthfulness in many areas was to be questioned. Now I began to understand that the Bible could, in fact, be trusted. With the aid of Strong's Concordance, I began to study the Bible to see what it says about itself. I discovered that the Bible teaches clearly that it is from God and is absolute in what it says. It is true in its history, in the promises God has made, in its prophecies, in the moral commands it gives, and in how to live the Christian life. “All scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness: That the man of God may be perfect, thoroughly furnished unto all good works” (II Timothy 3:16-17).

 

This discovery was made while visiting in Vancouver, B.C., and in Seattle. When I was asked to talk to the prayer group in St. Stephen's Catholic Church, I took as my subject the absolute authority of God's Word. It was the first time that I had understood such a truth or talked about it. I returned to Vancouver, B.C. and in a large parish Church, before about 400 people, I preached the same message. Bible in hand, I proclaimed that “the absolute and final authority in all matters of faith and morals is the Bible, God's own Word.”

 

Three days later, the archbishop of Vancouver, B.C., James Carney, called me to his office. I was then officially silenced and forbidden to preach in his archdiocese. I was told that my punishment would have been more severe, were it not for the letter of recommendation I had received from my own archbishop, Anthony Pantin. Soon afterwards I returned to Trinidad. http://www.bereanbea...testimony.html

 

I would like to add to what the priest wrote. 

I grew up in the Catholic Church, and  went to Mass and communion every day'

Jesus called me into his ministry, and after I accepted he asked me to give him my life.  The Holy Spirit let me know that if I gave my life to Jesus I would lose everything I owned. 

A few months later I was living in a tent with my wife, three babies, and a dog.

I asked Jesus, after accepting his call, what seminary I could attend.  Jesus told me: "NO! don't read about me.  I will teach you about me."

When Jesus personally started teaching me I was angry with the Church, because it did not teach a spiritual relationship about God.

The problem is not the people leading the Church, because they don't have a clue what it means to have a personal relationship with Jesus.

The Christian Church stopped being led by the Holy Spirit after its being deceived by Satan through Constantine the Great.

No Christian Church that I know of teaches the whole truth. 

John tell us anyone who sins is of the devil, and if he or she sins they never knew God.  The Church says everyone sins, so that there alone tell us who is leading the Church.


Edited by Johnlove, 20 June 2014 - 12:09 PM.


#14
enoob57

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John tell us anyone who sins is of the devil, and if he or she sins they never knew God.  The Church says everyone sins, so that there alone tell us who is leading the Church.

John also tells us whoever says they are without sin makes God a liar!
1 John 1:8-10
8 If we say that we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth
is not in us. 9 If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to f
forgive us our sins, and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness.
10 If we say that we have not sinned, we make him a liar, and his
word is not in us.
KJV

As this letter was addressed to believers from John Himself I would give great heed to
what John through the Holy Spirit is saying here! Love, Steven

#15
Johnlove

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(1 John 1: 8-10) “If we claim to be without sin, we deceive ourselves and the truth is not in us. If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just and will forgive us our sins and purify us from all unrighteousness. If we claim we have not sinned, we make him out to be a liar and his word has no place in our lives.”

You need to see John was saying if one says he or she says they have never sinned they are liars. 

If one is forgiven of all unrighteousness are they not then sinless? Could they then be liars if they say they are sinless?

John later says:

(1 John 3:3-9) “Surely everyone who entertains this hope must purify himself, must try to be as pure as Christ.  Any one who sins at all breaks the law, because to sin is to break the law.  Now you know that He appeared in order to abolish sin, and that in Him there is no sin: anyone who lives in God does not sin, and anyone who sins has never seen Him or known Him.  My children do not let anyone lead you astray’ to live a holy life is to be holy just as He is holy’ to lead a sinful life is to belong the Devil, since the Devil was a sinner from the beginning.  It was to undo all that the Devil has done that the Son of God appeared.  No one who has been begotten by God sins: because God’s seed remains inside him, he cannot sin when he has been begotten by God.” 

(1 John 3:8) “He who does what is sinful is of the devil, because the devil has been sinning from the beginning. The reason the Son of God appeared was to destroy the devil's work”

John told us those who did not know God sinned and asked forgiveness and were forgiven, but once a person comes to know God he or she will not sin.

Scripture goes on to say that if a person who does know God uses their free will to sin there is no repentance for that person. 

(Hebrews 10:26-31) “If, after we have been given knowledge of the truth, we should deliberately commit any sins, then there is no longer any sacrifice for them.  There is left only the dreadful prospect of judgment and of the fiery wrath that is to devour your enemies.  Anyone who disregards the Law of Moses is ruthlessly put to death on the word of two witnesses or three; and you may be sure that anyone who tramples on the Son of God, and who treats the blood of the covenant which sanctified him as if it were not holy, and who insults the Spirit of grace, will be condemned to a far severer punishment.  We are all aware who it was that said: Vengeance is mine; I will vindicate his people.  It is a dreadful thing to fall into the hands of the living God.”  

(Hebrews 6: 4) “As for those people who were once brought into the light, and tasted the gift from heaven, and received a share of the Holy Spirit, and appreciated the good message of God and the powers of the world to come and yet in spite of this have fallen away it is impossible for that to be renewed a second time.  They cannot be repentant if they have willfully crucified the Son of God and openly mocked Him.”



#16
Willamina

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My hubby always addresses Father God as "Father".  Whenever he leads in prayer by addressing Father, I think of the catholics saying "bless me father for I have sinned" when they go to confession!  I called my earthly father Daddy.  The name that the Holy Spirit puts in our hearts to call Father God is actually more like Papa, a more familiar and less formal name.  It is one of relationship.  But Jesus did teach us to pray Our Father Who is in heaven.  It is not wrong at all to call Him Father.  

Our grandkids call hubby Papa.    

I can't call my pastor "father", even when I went to the Episcopal Church.  






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