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What Will Tyler Perry Do?

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#1
OldSchool2

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"Tyler Perry ... has successfully trademarked and now owns the question, 'What Would Jesus Do?' ...

"The famous imperative, which dates back to an 1896 use in a book by Charles Sheldon, was never copyrighted ... Perry did include a disclaimer in his registration, saying he was not attempting ownership on the exclusive right to use 'Jesus' ...

"Now the real question is, What Will Tyler Perry Do?"

http://dailycaller.c.../#ixzz36VK8yLwZ
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#2
LadyC

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that's just stupid. i mean, the phrase has been used for as long as i can remember as a slogan on tshirts and jewelry. for anyone to claim ownership (and be granted it!) of a phrase is insane! why can't the copyright office grant him exclusive rights to use it as a movie title and let that be the end of it? but under the circumstances,  does this now mean that people who produce apparel and accessories must cease selling them or be sued for infringement?


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#3
B3L13v3R

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    I would like to see the Body of Christ come together as one. Our guideline must be the Word of God and it rightly divided. Of the 20 some Bible versions I have, I find the KJV to have the most depth.

Well... Hopefully Mr Perry would repent, and believe on the Real Lord Jesus Christ, and then look to follow Jesus according to His Word!
Instead of looking to make a buck off of the godly logo... "What Would Jesus Do?"
According to some of his bio, he had a terrible upbringing, but his mother did take him to church. He describes himself as a Christian.

Many of Tyler Perry's movies are known for sex, drugs, violence, adultery, and the like.
New Ager Oprah Winfrey was his inspiration initially to start writing, and he recently became a partner with Oprah Winfrey and her network.

For those who would like to read the book "In His Steps" by Charles Sheldon, that the logo Tyler Perry "trademarked" stems from, it is available here for free.
http://www.ccel.org/...on/ihsteps.html

Good read, about 174 pages. The book ask the question over 50 times: "What Would Jesus Do?"
It has an older fair movie that is based on the same if you get a chance to view it.

 

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Part of Chapter One, of Charles M. Sheldon's "In His Steps" (Public Domain), emphasis mine:

"For hereunto were ye called; because Christ also suffered for you, leaving you an example, that ye should follow in his steps."

It was Friday morning and the Rev. Henry Maxwell was trying to finish his Sunday morning sermon. He had been interrupted several times and was growing nervous as the morning wore away, and the sermon grew very slowly toward a satisfactory finish.

"Mary," he called to his wife, as he went upstairs after the last interruption, "if any one comes after this, I wish you would say I am very busy and cannot come down unless it is something very important."

"Yes, Henry. But I am going over to visit the kindergarten and you will have the house all to yourself."

The minister went up into his study and shut the door. In a few minutes he heard his wife go out, and then everything was quiet. He settled himself at his desk with a sigh of relief and began to write. His text was from 1 Peter 2:21: "For hereunto were ye called; because Christ also suffered for you, leaving you an example that ye should follow his steps."

He had emphasized in the first part of the sermon the Atonement as a personal sacrifice, calling attention to the fact of Jesus' suffering in various ways, in His life as well as in His death. He had then gone on to emphasize the Atonement from the side of example, giving illustrations from the life and teachings of Jesus to show how faith in the Christ helped to save men because of the pattern or character He displayed for their imitation. He was now on the third and last point, the necessity of following Jesus in His sacrifice and example.

He had put down "Three Steps. What are they?" and was about to enumerate them in logical order when the bell rang sharply. It was one of those clock-work bells, and always went off as a clock might go if it tried to strike twelve all at once.

Henry Maxwell sat at his desk and frowned a little. He made no movement to answer the bell. Very soon it rang again; then he rose and walked over to one of his windows which commanded the view of the front door. A man was standing on the steps. He was a young man, very shabbily dressed.

"Looks like a tramp," said the minister.
"I suppose I'll have to go down and--"

He did not finish his sentence but he went downstairs and opened the front door. There was a moment's pause as the two men stood facing each other, then the shabby-looking young man said:
"I'm out of a job, sir, and thought maybe you might put me in the way of getting something."
"I don't know of anything. Jobs are scarce--" replied the minister, beginning to shut the door slowly.

"I didn't know but you might perhaps be able to give me a line to the city railway or the superintendent of the shops, or something," continued the young man, shifting his faded hat from one hand to the other nervously.

"It would be of no use. You will have to excuse me. I am very busy this morning. I hope you will find something. Sorry I can't give you something to do here.
But I keep only a horse and a cow and do the work myself."

The Rev. Henry Maxwell closed the door and heard the man walk down the steps. As he went up into his study he saw from his hall window that the man was going slowly down the street, still holding his hat between his hands. There was something in the figure so dejected, homeless and forsaken that the minister hesitated a moment as he stood looking at it. Then he turned to his desk and with a sigh began the writing where he had left off. He had no more interruptions, and when his wife came in two hours later the sermon was finished, the loose leaves gathered up and neatly tied together, and laid on his Bible all ready for the Sunday morning service...

(Later, The Rev. Henry Maxwell finishes preaching the written sermon mentioned above, choir getting ready to sing)

...The sermon was interesting. It was full of striking sentences. They would have commanded attention printed. Spoken with the passion of a dramatic utterance that had the good taste never to offend with a suspicion of ranting or declamation, they were very effective. If the Rev. Henry Maxwell that morning felt satisfied with the conditions of his pastorate, the First Church also had a similar feeling as it congratulated itself on the presence in the pulpit of this scholarly, refined, somewhat striking face and figure, preaching with such animation and freedom from all vulgar, noisy or disagreeable mannerism.

Suddenly, into the midst of this perfect accord and concord between preacher and audience, there came a very remarkable interruption. It would be difficult to indicate the extent of the shock which this interruption measured. It was so unexpected, so entirely contrary to any thought of any person present that it offered no room for argument or, for the time being, of resistance.


The sermon had come to a close. Mr. Maxwell had just turned the half of the big Bible over upon his manuscript and was about to sit down as the quartet prepared to arise to sing the closing selection,

All for Jesus, all for Jesus,
All my being's ransomed powers,...


when the entire congregation was startled by the sound of a man's voice. It came from the rear of the church, from one of the seats under the gallery. The next moment the figure of a man came out of the shadow there and walked down the middle aisle. Before the startled congregation fairly realized what was going on the man had reached the open space in front of the pulpit and had turned about facing the people.

"I've been wondering since I came in here"--they were the words he used under the gallery, and he repeated them--"if it would be just the thing to say a word at the close of the service. I'm not drunk and I'm not crazy, and I am perfectly harmless, but if I die, as there is every likelihood I shall in a few days, I want the satisfaction of thinking that I said my say in a place like this, and before this sort of a crowd."

Mr. Maxwell had not taken his seat, and he now remained standing, leaning on his pulpit, looking down at the stranger. It was the man who had come to his house the Friday before, the same dusty, worn, shabby-looking young man. He held his faded hat in his two hands. It seemed to be a favorite gesture. He had not been shaved and his hair was rough and tangled. It is doubtful if any one like this had ever confronted the First Church within the sanctuary. It was tolerably familiar with this sort of humanity out on the street, around the railroad shops, wandering up and down the avenue, but it had never dreamed of such an incident as this so near.

There was nothing offensive in the man's manner or tone. He was not excited and he spoke in a low but distinct voice. Mr. Maxwell was conscious, even as he stood there smitten into dumb astonishment at the event, that somehow the man's action reminded him of a person he had once seen walking and talking in his sleep.

No one in the house made any motion to stop the stranger or in any way interrupt him. Perhaps the first shock of his sudden appearance deepened into a genuine perplexity concerning what was best to do. However that may be, he went on as if he had no thought of interruption and no thought of the unusual element which he had introduced into the decorum of the First Church service. And all the while he was speaking, the minister leaned over the pulpit, his face growing more white and sad every moment. But he made no movement to stop him, and the people sat smitten into breathless silence. One other face, that of Rachel Winslow from the choir, stared white and intent down at the shabby figure with the faded hat. Her face was striking at any time. Under the pressure of the present unheard-of incident it was as personally distinct as if it had been framed in fire.

"I'm not an ordinary tramp, though I don't know of any teaching of Jesus that makes one kind of a tramp less worth saving than another. Do you?" He put the question as naturally as if the whole congregation had been a small Bible class. He paused just a moment and coughed painfully. Then he went on.

"I lost my job ten months ago. I am a printer by trade. The new inotype machines are beautiful specimens of invention, but I know six men who have killed themselves inside of the year just on account of those machines. Of course I don't blame the newspapers for getting the machines. Meanwhile, what can a man do? I know I never learned but the one trade, and that's all I can do. I've tramped all over the country trying to find something. There are a good many others like me. I'm not complaining, am I? Just stating facts. But I was wondering as I sat there under the gallery, if what you call following Jesus is the same thing as what He taught. What did He mean when He said: Follow Me!'? The minister said,"--here he turned about and looked up at the pulpit--"that it is necessary for the disciple of Jesus to follow His steps, and he said the steps are obedience, faith, love and imitation.'
But I did not hear him tell you just what he meant that to mean, especially the last step. What do you Christians mean by following the steps of Jesus?

"I've tramped through this city for three days trying to find a job; and in all that time I've not had a word of sympathy or comfort except from your minister here, who said he was sorry for me and hoped I would find a job somewhere. I suppose it is because you get so imposed on by the professional tramp that you have lost your interest in any other sort. I'm not blaming anybody, am I? Just stating facts. Of course, I understand you can't all go out of your way to hunt up jobs for other people like me. I'm not asking you to; but what I feel puzzled about is, what is meant by following Jesus. What do you mean when you sing I'll go with Him, with Him, all the way?'...

...I heard some people singing at a church prayer meeting the other night,

All for Jesus, all for Jesus,
All my being's ransomed powers,
All my thoughts, and all my doings,
All my days, and all my hours.

and I kept wondering as I sat on the steps outside just what they meant by it.

It seems to me there's an awful lot of trouble in the world that somehow wouldn't exist if all the people who sing such songs went and lived them out. I suppose I don't understand. But what would Jesus do?


Is that what you mean by following His steps?
 

--------------------

Part of Chapter 39, kind of reminds me in a small way of the new trademark "owner" of "What Would Jesus Do?"

"For hereunto were ye called; because Christ also suffered for you, leaving you an example, that ye should follow in his steps."

He saw Jasper Chase, who had denied his Master, growing into a cold, cynical, formal life, writing novels that were social successes, but each one with a sting in it, the reminder of his denial, the bitter remorse that, do what he would, no social success could remove....

-----------------------

Again folks, good story, there are a few here over the years that have been to this board in similar circumstances as the initial “tramp” mentioned, that, thank God, have gone on to find the Savior Jesus Christ!

A great saying; “What Would Jesus Do?”

Another great saying; “What Did Jesus Do?”

Both ideas are found clearly in the Bible. Christians, let us be about our Father's business! :)


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