Committed Wife

Which version of The Bible is Best?

19 posts in this topic

When it comes to reading and studying the Bible, people often become overwhelmed and confused about versions of the Bible.

While the KJV can often be used by many churches, new babes/converts may not always understand the language.

Some versions that have helped me to learn more about God and grow spiritually include:

The New King James

The Amplified Bible

The Message Bible

They all basically say the same thing, but they are presented differently.

There are many others, Check them all out and decide what is best for you.

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Welcome Commited Wife!  contentious question  i think there are threads already started  You could post Your opinion there  quite lively

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The Amplified was the first I ever read some 55 years ago. I now use NKJ a lot. But I learned that not all are translations. The Living Bible and the Message are paraphrases and are full of more opinion than the translations. So I don't refer to them. It is a bit like seeing the movie after reading the Book. The movies are embelished to make them more attractive and interesting, but they lack the truth of the real story.

Willa

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When it comes to reading and studying the Bible, people often become overwhelmed and confused about versions of the Bible.

While the KJV can often be used by many churches, new babes/converts may not always understand the language.

Some versions that have helped me to learn more about God and grow spiritually include:

The New King James

The Amplified Bible

The Message Bible

They all basically say the same thing, but they are presented differently.

There are many others, Check them all out and decide what is best for you.

I have both a NKJ and and Amplified, I love them both.

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Wow, I read the Old King James, the Living Bible, The NIV and my favourite, the NKJ. They all are similar yet some give a better interpretation, hence my NKJ preference.

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The Amplified was the first I ever read some 55 years ago. I now use NKJ a lot. But I learned that not all are translations. The Living Bible and the Message are paraphrases and are full of more opinion than the translations. So I don't refer to them. It is a bit like seeing the movie after reading the Book. The movies are embelished to make them more attractive and interesting, but they lack the truth of the real story.

Willa

considering that there are many words in Greek and Hebrew that can not be directly translated word for word, could it be that a paraphrase might actually be closer to the original writers thoughts?

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I use the NKJV, KJV, MKJV, ESV, and slews of commentaries....mostly Gills, Clarke, Barnes.....I just started reading the KJV when I was saved a little over 3 yrs ago and just can't seem to get into other versions.....not gonna make the claim that it's better - have to use it, or anything like that. I just prefer it over the rest.  :) Psalms in the KJV to me is just about as beautiful as it can get.

 

 

God Bless,

Hip

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The Amplified was the first I ever read some 55 years ago. I now use NKJ a lot. But I learned that not all are translations. The Living Bible and the Message are paraphrases and are full of more opinion than the translations. So I don't refer to them. It is a bit like seeing the movie after reading the Book. The movies are embelished to make them more attractive and interesting, but they lack the truth of the real story.

Willa

considering that there are many words in Greek and Hebrew that can not be directly translated word for word, could it be that a paraphrase might actually be closer to the original writers thoughts?

 

I think it would be an accident if that were the case, unless they were fluent in greek and hebrew and read the original language, then put it in their own words, it might get closer.  When I paraphrase something I put someone else's translation in my own words and add my own interpretation.

 

I could read John 7:38 to say "He who believes in Jesus will have powerful life giving words gush out from deep within him.."That is my take on a literal translation.  Or rivulets of life giving water will be pumped through his heart.  Or  after a person believes in Christ he will vomit water out of his belly.    

I chose this passage because it is the one Wycliffe translators had difficulty translation for an island people who lived off rain and dew, and had no other  source  of fresh water.  Jesus is likening the Holy Spirit to the life giving artesian well of fresh water.

But putting our interpretation on someone else's translation,  and putting that in our own words, can get us far off track.    

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I prefer ESV for my daily reading, but my pastor said that he likes to read the Message when it comes to the prophets and other difficult to wade through books. So I think I'll use both next time I try to read the prophets.

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The Amplified was the first I ever read some 55 years ago. I now use NKJ a lot. But I learned that not all are translations. The Living Bible and the Message are paraphrases and are full of more opinion than the translations. So I don't refer to them. It is a bit like seeing the movie after reading the Book. The movies are embelished to make them more attractive and interesting, but they lack the truth of the real story.

Willa

considering that there are many words in Greek and Hebrew that can not be directly translated word for word, could it be that a paraphrase might actually be closer to the original writers thoughts?

 

I think it would be an accident if that were the case, unless they were fluent in greek and hebrew and read the original language, then put it in their own words, it might get closer.  When I paraphrase something I put someone else's translation in my own words and add my own interpretation.

 

I could read John 7:38 to say "He who believes in Jesus will have powerful life giving words gush out from deep within him.."That is my take on a literal translation.  Or rivulets of life giving water will be pumped through his heart.  Or  after a person believes in Christ he will vomit water out of his belly.    

I chose this passage because it is the one Wycliffe translators had difficulty translation for an island people who lived off rain and dew, and had no other  source  of fresh water.  Jesus is likening the Holy Spirit to the life giving artesian well of fresh water.

But putting our interpretation on someone else's translation,  and putting that in our own words, can get us far off track.    

 

I would hope that people translating the Bible would be very fluent in Greek and Hebrew..   if many were on a committee, it would cut down on the agendas.

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I use the NAS and I have alot of other translations. I also have a Womans study bible that is NIV. Depends on what I Am studying as to whic version and comentary I use

Welcome!

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considering that there are many words in Greek and Hebrew that can not be directly translated word for word, could it be that a paraphrase might actually be closer to the original writers thoughts?

yes

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I there were a clear answer to the question, which version is best, then it is doubtful that less that best version, would have much of  market share.

  • If I want to memorize passages, I prefer the KJV, I think the funny weird English is easier to remember.
  • If I want easy to read and understand,  I prefer an early version  of the NIV.
  • If I want to have a Bible, that if pretty faithful to the original meaning in the original languages, and yet remain understandable,I refer the NASB (for American English readers). This is my favorite Bible for most uses. 
  • If I want one with good study supplements, I like the ESV Study Bible, and second to that, I like the Thompson Chain reference bible, it which ever version I prefer that day.

For this reason, I like parallel Bibles, where several version are side by side.

My favorite New Testament only Bible, is The Zondervan Greek and English Interlinear New Testament (NASB/NIV) - Second Ecition.

If I had more time, I would give a detailed answer, but the best Bible, is the one you will be most likely to read often. Unread Bibles are of little use.

The truly best Bible, it the original autographs, the manuscripts penned by the human authors themselves, Moses, David, Paul, Luke, John, etc. Unfortunely, we do not have those, so we have to settle for something second best, at best.

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what is the difference between the  KJV and the NKJV is there much difference,  I am asking ? I love my KJV, but some words  are not the same as in gen 6 sons of god, is it giants  or nephilims, or violent wild men ? this is where I have a problem to know what is the best to  be used to understand scripture? other bibles use different words and so the scripture does not mean the same in every bible.

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8 minutes ago, SINNERSAVED said:

what is the difference between the  KJV and the NKJV is there much difference,  I am asking ? I love my KJV, but some words  are not the same as in gen 6 sons of god, is it giants  or nephilims, or violent wild men ? this is where I have a problem to know what is the best to  be used to understand scripture? other bibles use different words and so the scripture does not mean the same in every bible.

I personally am using a Bible program that lets me see several translations, and can select a Greek/Hebrew to English word for word version showing the Strongs definitions for each word.   It has both the Nestle and TR manuscripts available, along with two concordances where you can look to other places in the Bible to see where that word was used..  The Genesis Chapter six verses are very controversial for they open doors that some people want to keep closed.  The differences in the translations don't actually make that much difference if you check the other places where those words are used.

Studying something like Genesis Chapter Six can be extremely time consuming.

Nephilim or Giants......    they are really the same thing just two different words to describe them.

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44 minutes ago, other one said:

I personally am using a Bible program that lets me see several translations, and can select a Greek/Hebrew to English word for word version showing the Strongs definitions for each word.   It has both the Nestle and TR manuscripts available, along with two concordances where you can look to other places in the Bible to see where that word was used..  The Genesis Chapter six verses are very controversial for they open doors that some people want to keep closed.  The differences in the translations don't actually make that much difference if you check the other places where those words are used.

Studying something like Genesis Chapter Six can be extremely time consuming.

Nephilim or Giants......    they are really the same thing just two different words to describe them.

CAN YOU FORWARD ME THAT PROGRAM OR IS IT A APP,? I THINK THAT WOULD BE GREAT TO CHECK IT OUT, DO YOU HAVE A LINK FOR IT, LET ME KNOW , THANK YOU.

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24 minutes ago, SINNERSAVED said:

CAN YOU FORWARD ME THAT PROGRAM OR IS IT A APP,? I THINK THAT WOULD BE GREAT TO CHECK IT OUT, DO YOU HAVE A LINK FOR IT, LET ME KNOW , THANK YOU.

https://biblesoft.com

Even the least expensive version will give you this:

Included with the NRL

The following content is included in the New Reference Library.  indicates a new add-on for Version 5.

 

Bibles and Concordances - 15 total

Cross References - 3 total

Commentary Sets - 5 total

Dictionaries and Encyclopedias - 6 total

Word Study Reference Works - 1 total

Greek-Hebrew Resources - 6 total

Theology & History - 13 total

Christian Living / Devotional - 4 total

Pastoral Helps - 4 total

Other Bible Helps - 6 total

Bibles and Concordances (top)

  • American Standard Version
  • Bible in Basic English 
  • Darby's Bible 1890
  • Douay–Rheims Bible 
  • English Standard Version
  • Exhaustive Concordances for each Bible Version
  • God's Word Translation
  • King James Version (with Apocrypha)
  • New King James Version
  • New Living Translation, 2nd ed.
  • Noah Webster's Bible (1833) 
  • The Message
  • Weymouth (NT in Modern Speech) 
  • World English Bible 
  • Young’s Literal Translation


Cross References (top)

  • Nave’s Topical Bible
  • PCSB Reference Chains 
  • Treasury of Scripture Knowledge


Commentary Sets (top)

  • Geneva Notes, commentary on the Geneva Bible by Calvin, Knox, & more!
  • Jamieson, Fausset & Brown Commentary – 6 volumes
  • Martin Luther's Commentary on Galatians
  • Matthew Henry’s Commentary Unabridged – 6 volumes
  • The Apocalypse: Lectures on Revelation by J.A. Seiss


Dictionaries and Encyclopedias (top)

  • Dictionary of Christianity in America
  • Easton’s Bible Dictionary
  • Fausset’s Bible Dictionary
  • Hitchcock’s Bible Names
  • Nelson’s Bible Dictionary
  • Smith's Bible Dictionary


Word Study Reference Works (top)

  • Vine’s Expository Dictionary of Biblical Words (OT & NT)


Greek-Hebrew Resources (top)

  • Brown, Driver & Briggs’ Hebrew definitions (abridged)
  • Englishman’s Greek Concordance
  • Englishman’s Hebrew Concordance
  • Exhaustive Strong’s Greek Dictionary with Concordance
  • Exhaustive Strong’s Hebrew Dictionary with Concordance
  • Thayer’s Greek definitions (abridged)


Theology & History (top)

  • Ancient and Reformation Creeds
  • Complete Works of John Bunyan – 3 volumes
  • Complete Works of John Owen – 14 volumes
  • Complete Works of Jonathan Edwards – 2 volumes
  • Foxe’s Book Of Martyrs
  • Institutes of the Christian Religion, John Calvin
  • Puritan works of Baxter, Watson, Manton, Sibbes, Flavel & more – 37 volumes
  • Summa Theologiae – Thomas Aquinas
  • Systematic Theology, Charles Finney
  • Works of Andrew Murray – 9 volumes
  • Works of John Wesley – 4 volumes
  • Works of Josephus – 3 volumes
  • Works of Martin Luther – 9 volumes


Christian Living / Devotional (top)

  • Book of Common Prayer
  • Names of God Series – 7 volumes
  • Spurgeon's Morning and Evening
  • The Imitation of Christ, Thomas a Kempis


Pastoral Helps (top)

  • Complete Bible Discussion Guide, New Testament 
  • Complete Bible Discussion Guide, Old Testament 
  • Spurgeon's Encyclopedia of Sermons – 8 volumes
  • The Fundamentals of Christianity, by RA Torrey


Other Bible Helps (top)

  • Bible Maps
  • Bible Photo Collection
  • Bible Reading Planner
  • Biblesoft Authoring System
  • PCSB Hymnal, including audio
  • Personal Study Note Manager
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12 minutes ago, other one said:

https://biblesoft.com

Even the least expensive version will give you this:

Included with the NRL

The following content is included in the New Reference Library.  indicates a new add-on for Version 5.

 

Bibles and Concordances - 15 total

Cross References - 3 total

Commentary Sets - 5 total

Dictionaries and Encyclopedias - 6 total

Word Study Reference Works - 1 total

Greek-Hebrew Resources - 6 total

Theology & History - 13 total

Christian Living / Devotional - 4 total

Pastoral Helps - 4 total

Other Bible Helps - 6 total

Bibles and Concordances (top)

  • American Standard Version
  • Bible in Basic English 
  • Darby's Bible 1890
  • Douay–Rheims Bible 
  • English Standard Version
  • Exhaustive Concordances for each Bible Version
  • God's Word Translation
  • King James Version (with Apocrypha)
  • New King James Version
  • New Living Translation, 2nd ed.
  • Noah Webster's Bible (1833) 
  • The Message
  • Weymouth (NT in Modern Speech) 
  • World English Bible 
  • Young’s Literal Translation


Cross References (top)

  • Nave’s Topical Bible
  • PCSB Reference Chains 
  • Treasury of Scripture Knowledge


Commentary Sets (top)

  • Geneva Notes, commentary on the Geneva Bible by Calvin, Knox, & more!
  • Jamieson, Fausset & Brown Commentary – 6 volumes
  • Martin Luther's Commentary on Galatians
  • Matthew Henry’s Commentary Unabridged – 6 volumes
  • The Apocalypse: Lectures on Revelation by J.A. Seiss


Dictionaries and Encyclopedias (top)

  • Dictionary of Christianity in America
  • Easton’s Bible Dictionary
  • Fausset’s Bible Dictionary
  • Hitchcock’s Bible Names
  • Nelson’s Bible Dictionary
  • Smith's Bible Dictionary


Word Study Reference Works (top)

  • Vine’s Expository Dictionary of Biblical Words (OT & NT)


Greek-Hebrew Resources (top)

  • Brown, Driver & Briggs’ Hebrew definitions (abridged)
  • Englishman’s Greek Concordance
  • Englishman’s Hebrew Concordance
  • Exhaustive Strong’s Greek Dictionary with Concordance
  • Exhaustive Strong’s Hebrew Dictionary with Concordance
  • Thayer’s Greek definitions (abridged)


Theology & History (top)

  • Ancient and Reformation Creeds
  • Complete Works of John Bunyan – 3 volumes
  • Complete Works of John Owen – 14 volumes
  • Complete Works of Jonathan Edwards – 2 volumes
  • Foxe’s Book Of Martyrs
  • Institutes of the Christian Religion, John Calvin
  • Puritan works of Baxter, Watson, Manton, Sibbes, Flavel & more – 37 volumes
  • Summa Theologiae – Thomas Aquinas
  • Systematic Theology, Charles Finney
  • Works of Andrew Murray – 9 volumes
  • Works of John Wesley – 4 volumes
  • Works of Josephus – 3 volumes
  • Works of Martin Luther – 9 volumes


Christian Living / Devotional (top)

  • Book of Common Prayer
  • Names of God Series – 7 volumes
  • Spurgeon's Morning and Evening
  • The Imitation of Christ, Thomas a Kempis


Pastoral Helps (top)

  • Complete Bible Discussion Guide, New Testament 
  • Complete Bible Discussion Guide, Old Testament 
  • Spurgeon's Encyclopedia of Sermons – 8 volumes
  • The Fundamentals of Christianity, by RA Torrey


Other Bible Helps (top)

  • Bible Maps
  • Bible Photo Collection
  • Bible Reading Planner
  • Biblesoft Authoring System
  • PCSB Hymnal, including audio
  • Personal Study Note Manager

THANK YOU FOR SENDING ME THE RESOURSE, AWESOME.

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