Jump to content

Servant of the Lord

Members
  • Content Count

    53
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

20 Neutral

2 Followers

About Servant of the Lord

  • Rank
    Junior Member

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    livingwordtx.com

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Wilmer
  • Interests
    Ministry, reading, computers spending time with family.

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. The local church, whether at Corinth, Colossae, Cleveland, or Cologne, is only part of the larger church (1:2d–f). This church is the church universal in its breadth. It is rooted in eternity and spread out through all time and space (1:2d). Most of its members are already in heaven. This larger church is the subject of his epistle to the Ephesians. Paul keeps it in mind, here, even though he is writing to a local church. For while he specifically addresses the church at Corinth, his letter is also for “all that in every place call upon the name of Jesus Christ.” This letter, then, is as much for us, who dwell in lands of which Paul never dreamed and at a time as far from his age as was that of Abraham, as it was for those dear Christians in nearby Corinth in 1 Cor. A.D. 55. Phillips, J. (2009). Exploring 1 Corinthians: An Expository Commentary (1 Co 1:1–9). Kregel Publications; WORDsearch Corp.
  2. Thank you for reading my posts Heleadethme. I agree and understand what you mean. Yet in 1 Corinthians 11 both men and women are given instructions on head coverings. As an aside, I also understand for some my posts in this thread might appear lengthy in nature. The way this topic 1 Corinthians 11 1-16 is being presented in this thread might not be for everyone. Some might find extensive reading laborious while others many find it enjoyable. There is nothing wrong with either personality each has their own likes and dislikes. Yet, this particular thread and the manner that I have been presenting the information has been on the lengthy side as I attempt to dive into greater detail on the subject 1 Corinthians 11 1 -16 head coverings for men and women during corporate worship. So with that in mind please bear with me beloved brothers and sisters in Christ. The "short" answer to you post Heleadethme which I will try to relate back to the topic 1 Corinthians 11 1-16 would be: Men and Women are equal in Gods eyes, but He has a certain order He wishes followed. For women to willingly take the subordinate role to the man, not due to inferiority but due to obedience to the wishes of God the Father. Similar to the obedience displayed by Christ to the Father although both equal Christ willingly took the subordinate role which pleased his Father in Heaven. "God has His own order within the Godhead itself. This is not an order based on being. Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are each eternally, equally, and essentially God. What is revealed here is a voluntary subordination of Christ in terms of office. By virtue of the Incarnation He became man, although in no sense did He cease to be God. He "took upon him the form of a servant, and was made in the likeness of men" (Phil. 2:7), even though "being in the form of God, [he] thought it not robbery to be equal with God" (2:6). He became man in order to fulfill the law, to be man as God intended Man to be, and to carry out God's purpose in redemption. The Lord Jesus saw no reason for resenting the subordinate role He voluntarily assumed in becoming man. He could cheerfully say, "I do always those things that please [the Father]" (John 8:29)." John Phillips Commentary Series, The - Exploring 1 Corinthians: An Expository Commentary. "By the same token the woman is answerable to the man. This does not imply male superiority, nor does it imply female inferiority. It simply states it to be a fact that, in their respective roles in society, in the home, and in the church, this is God's ordained order and state of affairs. No amount of argument is going to change it. All attempts to defy it can only lead to breakdown and chaos." John Phillips Commentary Series, The - Exploring 1 Corinthians: An Expository Commentary. The "long" answer which I will try to relate back to the topic 1 Corinthians 11 1-16 would be: Excerpt used for EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY: John Phillips Commentary Series, The - Exploring 1 Corinthians: An Expository Commentary. At issue here is the controversial matter of the woman's role in the church. Paul is accused of narrow-mindedness (although how anyone could be broader-minded than Paul is difficult to say) and of a bias against women (which is totally unfair, since no one was more courteous to women and considerate of women than Paul). What Paul does insist on is order in the church, order based on experience, common sense, observation, nature, and, above all, Scripture and divine revelation. Anyone who has a quarrel with the order, especially where men and women meet together on the grounds of a common salvation, upon which the apostle insists, have a quarrel not with him but with the Holy Spirit. Paul is not airing prejudice or male chauvinism in this passage. He is writing under the direct inspiration and illumination of the Holy Spirit, who certainly knows what is best for the church He created, and who makes no mistakes. Paul begins with a word of commendation: "Now I praise you, brethren, that ye remember me in all things, and keep the ordinances, as I delivered them to you" (11:2). The word for ordinances is paradosis, usually used in a negative sense in the New Testament. It is used of "traditions," especially the traditions of the Jewish rabbis. The word is used here and in 2 Thessalonians 2:15; 3:6, positively. It seems, when used in this way, to refer to church order and to the two specific ordinances the Lord did give to the church—baptism and the communion feast. Always eager to find something to praise, Paul commends the Corinthians for their exercise about these things. However, he evidently has weightier matters on his mind. His but rings out with haste, before the ink is dry on his commendation. There follows a word of comprehension (1 Cor. 11:3-16), in which Paul develops the whole subject of the woman's role in the local church. Two subjects are discussed—headship (11:3-12) and hair (11:13-16). The headship of the man is made immediately and abundantly clear. The fact of man's headship is categorically declared (11:3). As to the human order of things, Paul says, "But I would have you know that the head of every man is Christ; and the head of the woman is the man" (11:3a); and as to the higher order of things, "The head of Christ is God" (11:3b). This brings us back to basics. God is a God of order (1 Cor. 14:40), an order that reaches back into His own nature. He insists on order in the universe. Science is predicated on the fact that this universe is based on order. This order extends into human affairs, to government, to the home, to the church. In terms of human life the woman has a head, the man; the man has a head, Christ, who by virtue of the fact that He is God, absolutely and eternally, takes priority and preeminence over the headship vested in the man. The man is answerable for his actions, ultimately and inescapably, to Christ. By the same token the woman is answerable to the man. This does not imply male superiority, nor does it imply female inferiority. It simply states it to be a fact that, in their respective roles in society, in the home, and in the church, this is God's ordained order and state of affairs. No amount of argument is going to change it. All attempts to defy it can only lead to breakdown and chaos. When a person purchases an appliance or a piece of equipment it normally comes with the manufacturer's instructions and warranty. Usually the warranty is valid only so long as the instructions are heeded. The manufacturer knows the nature and complexity of the equipment better than anyone. Alter all, he designed and made it. If the instructions come with the warning, "Press button 'A' before you press button 'B' " it is because of some basic requirement connected with the structure and nature of the machine. If a person reverses the order and insists on pressing button B before button A, and things go wrong, what can he expect? The instructions were clear and plain. Human life and society are far more complex than any man-made appliance. We would do well to heed the Maker's instructions. He categorically states that the head of the man is Christ and that the head of the woman is the man. That is the way things are. The feminist lobby, for all its noise, anger, organization, and resentment, is not going to change the way things are. This is true of society in general, the home in particular, and the church above all. In this chapter, of course, Paul is more concerned with order in the church. He carries the principle of order even higher by affirming that even Christ has a head—God. He places this statement after the one which says that the head of the woman is the man, as though to soften any possible blow to the woman's pride. God has His own order within the Godhead itself. This is not an order based on being. Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are each eternally, equally, and essentially God. What is revealed here is a voluntary subordination of Christ in terms of office. By virtue of the Incarnation He became man, although in no sense did He cease to be God. He "took upon him the form of a servant, and was made in the likeness of men" (Phil. 2:7), even though "being in the form of God, [he] thought it not robbery to be equal with God" (2:6). He became man in order to fulfill the law, to be man as God intended Man to be, and to carry out God's purpose in redemption. The Lord Jesus saw no reason for resenting the subordinate role He voluntarily assumed in becoming man. He could cheerfully say, "I do always those things that please [the Father]" (John 8:29). So then, in the human order of things and in the highest order of things Paul establishes categorically the fact of headship. But he has only just begun. We note next that the fact of man's headship is correspondingly displayed (1 Cor. 11:4-7). First comes the principle (11:4-5). In the first place, the man must display his supremacy in the church: "Every man praying or prophesying, having his head covered, dishonoureth his head" (11:4). Since this statement follows right on from the previous one, it is evident that "his head," which he thus dishonors, is Christ. When a man takes a leading role in a church activity, such as praying or preaching, he is to leave his physical head uncovered in order to display his headship in spiritual things and in order to acknowledge the headship of Christ. This is a very remarkable statement. In the synagogue exactly the opposite was enjoined. To this day a Jew, reading the Torah in the synagogue, puts on a cap known as a yarmulke. Some of the stricter Jews always cover their heads in public. The Jewish custom of the man covering his head when the Scriptures are read goes back before Paul's day. The Holy Spirit, by requiring the very opposite practice in the church, is evidently striking a blow at the Judaizers, who were forever trying to corrupt Christianity into a mere extension of what Paul calls elsewhere "the Jews' religion." The "covering" to which Paul refers in verse 4 is technically a veil which covers the man's whole head and conceals all his hair. Possibly there were men in the Corinthian church who were going to this extreme of self-abnegation in worship, thinking they were pleasing God by such a display. Paul repudiates any such practice. The contrary was what was called for: the man must pray and preach with his head completely uncovered to display his headship and the Lord's. By contrast, the woman must display her subordination in the church: "But every woman that prayeth or prophesieth with her head uncovered dishonoureth her head: for that is even all one as if she were shaven" (11:5). The woman's head, here, is the man. If and when a woman takes a public part in church worship she must cover her physical head in order to honor the man who is her spiritual head. By so covering her head she displays her subjection to the man and witnesses that she is functioning, in a public capacity, under the authority of the man.
  3. So true.. I meant after... Theologians commenting on their work via written commentary series/volumes; such as those I posted for educational purposes and to try to make certain things clearer.
  4. I am sorry that you feel that way... I do believe neutral observers of this thread will come to the conclusion I have supported all positions with scripture and have not "gone through the bible to cherry pick verses out of context to support unsound doctrine." Let me first say in love brother that we live at a time when it is unpopular to confront others for immoral or improper actions and words. The popular belief of today is that everyone should be able to do their own thing, and others have no right to “judge” or correct them. What a mess this idea has created in our society and in our churches. Sadly, many Christians have embraced this complacent attitude toward correcting others, and, as a result, sin and false doctrine in the church are seldom confronted and curbed. However, the Bible tells us that: 2 Tim. 3:16-17 16 All Scripture is God-breathed and is useful for teaching, rebuking, correcting and training in righteousness, 17 so that the man of God may be thoroughly equipped for every good work. 2 Tim. 4:1-2 1 In the presence of God and of Christ Jesus, who will judge the living and the dead, and in view of his appearing and his kingdom, I give you this charge: 2 Preach the Word; be prepared in season and out of season; correct, rebuke and encourage — with great patience and careful instruction. God tells us that His Word is not only to be used to teach and encourage but also to “correct” and “rebuke.” And in 2 Timothy 4: 3, He tells us why we must be faithful to use His Word to correct others who are in the wrong: 2 Tim. 4:3 For the time will come when men will not put up with sound doctrine. Instead, to suit their own desires, they will gather around them a great number of teachers to say what their itching ears want to hear. This prophetic writing began its fulfillment shortly after it was penned and has escalated to what is happening in churches today. There are presently a great number of teachers willing to say what itching ears want to hear, instead of telling the truth as revealed in God’s Word. However, many who embrace certain views about doctrine inevitably end up altering the clear meaning of passages that contradict what they believe. And as a result, they pass their tainted understanding of the Scriptures on to those they share with. Sadly, this in turn distorts other people’s knowledge of the Lord Jesus Christ and His Word. Why does it matter? Because this is very serious. That is why God urges us to contend for the faith: Phil. 1:27 Whatever happens, conduct yourselves in a manner worthy of the gospel of Christ. Then, whether I come and see you or only hear about you in my absence, I will know that you stand firm in one spirit, contending as one man for the faith of the gospel… Jude 3 Dear friends, although I was very eager to write to you about the salvation we share, I felt I had to write and urge you to contend for the faith that was once for all entrusted to the saints.
  5. Thank you for your contribution Heleadethme. I agree we should not add or take away, but I do believe we should look closely what scripture tells us and the plain meaning of the text. Please read the below carefully... 1 Corinthians 11:1-16 (KJV) 1 Be ye followers of me, even as I also am of Christ. 2 Now I praise you, brethren, that ye remember me in all things, and keep the ordinances, as I delivered them to you. 3 But I would have you know, that the head of every man is Christ; and the head of the woman is the man; and the head of Christ is God. 4 Every man praying or prophesying, having his head covered, dishonoureth his head. 5 But every woman that prayeth or prophesieth with her head uncovered dishonoureth her head: for that is even all one as if she were shaven. 6 For if the woman be not covered, let her also be shorn: but if it be a shame for a woman to be shorn or shaven, let her be covered. 7 For a man indeed ought not to cover his head, forasmuch as he is the image and glory of God: but the woman is the glory of the man. 8 For the man is not of the woman; but the woman of the man. 9 Neither was the man created for the woman; but the woman for the man. 10 For this cause ought the woman to have power on her head because of the angels. 11 Nevertheless neither is the man without the woman, neither the woman without the man, in the Lord. 12 For as the woman is of the man, even so is the man also by the woman; but all things of God. 13 Judge in yourselves: is it comely that a woman pray unto God uncovered? 14 Doth not even nature itself teach you, that, if a man have long hair, it is a shame unto him? 15 But if a woman have long hair, it is a glory to her: for her hair is given her for a covering. 16 But if any man seem to be contentious, we have no such custom, neither the churches of God. Excerpt used for EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY: MacDonald, W. (1995). Believer’s Bible Commentary: Old and New Testaments. (A. Farstad, Ed.) (pp. 1785–1787). Nashville: Thomas Nelson. 11:2 The apostle first of all commends the Corinthians for the way in which they remembered him in all things, and held fast the traditions just as he had delivered them. Traditions refer not to habits and practices that have arisen in the church down through the years, but rather, in this case, to the inspired instructions of the Apostle Paul. 11:3 Paul now introduces the subject of women’s head coverings. Behind his instruction is the fact that every ordered society is built on two pillars—authority and subjection to that authority. It is impossible to have a well-functioning community where these two principles are not observed. Paul mentions three great relationships involving authority and subjection. First, the head of every man is Christ; Christ is Lord and man is subject to Him. Secondly, the head of woman is man; the place of headship was given to the man, and the woman is under his authority. Third, the head of Christ is God; even in the Godhead, One Person has the place of rule and Another takes the place of willing subordination. These examples of headship and submission were designed by God Himself and are fundamental in His arrangement of the universe. At the outset it should be emphasized that subjection does not mean inferiority. Christ is subject to God the Father but He is not inferior to Him. Neither is woman inferior to man, though she is subordinate to him. 11:4 Every man who prays or prophesies with his head covered dishonors his head, that is, Christ. It is saying, in effect, that the man does not acknowledge Christ as his head. Thus it is an act of gross disrespect. 11:5 Every woman who prays or prophesies with her head uncovered dishonors her head, that is, the man. She is saying, in effect, that she does not recognize man’s God-given headship and will not submit to it. If this were the only verse in the Bible on the subject, then it would imply that it is all right for a woman to pray or prophesy in the assembly as long as she has a veil or other covering on her head. But Paul teaches elsewhere that women should be silent in the assembly (1 Cor. 14:34), that they are not permitted to teach or to have authority over the man but to be in silence (1 Tim. 2:12). Actually meetings of the assembly do not come into view until verse 17, so the instructions concerning the head-covering in verses 2–16 cannot be confined to church meetings. They apply to whenever a woman prays or prophesies. She prays silently in the assembly, since 1 Timothy 2:8 limits public prayer to the men (lit., males). She prays audibly or silently at other times. She prophesies when she teaches other women (Titus 2:3–5) or children in the Sunday school. 11:6 If a woman is not covered, she might as well be shorn. But if it is shameful for a woman to be shorn or shaved, then she should be covered. The unveiled head of a woman is as shameful as if her hair were cut off. The apostle is not commanding a barber’s operation but rather telling what moral consistency would require! 11:7 In verses 7–10, Paul teaches the subordination of the woman to the man by going back to creation. This should forever lay to rest any idea that his teaching about women’s covering was what was culturally suitable in his day but not applicable to us today. The headship of man and the subjection of woman have been God’s order from the very beginning. First of all, man is the image and glory of God whereas woman is the glory of man. This means that man was placed on earth as God’s representative, to exercise dominion over it. Man’s uncovered head is a silent witness to this fact. The woman was never given this place of headship; instead she is the glory of man in the sense that she “renders conspicuous the authority of man,” as W. E. Vine expresses it. Man indeed ought not to cover his head in prayer; it would be tantamount to veiling the glory of God, and this would be an insult to the Divine Majesty. 11:8 Paul next reminds us that man was not created from woman but woman was created from man. The man was first, then the woman was taken from his side. This priority of the man strengthens the apostle’s case for man’s headship. 11:9 The purpose of creation is next alluded to in order to press home the point. Nor was man created primarily for the woman, but rather woman for the man. The Lord distinctly stated in Genesis 2:18, “It is not good that man should be alone; I will make him a helper comparable to him.” 11:10 Because of her position of subordination to man, the woman ought to have a symbol of authority on her head. The symbol of authority is the head-covering and here it indicates not her own authority but subjection to the authority of her husband. Why does Paul add because of the angels? We would suggest that the angels are spectators of the things that are happening on earth today, as they were of the things that happened at creation. In the first creation, they saw how woman usurped the place of headship over the man. She made the decision that Adam should have made. As a result of this, sin entered the human race with its unspeakable aftermath of misery and woe. God does not want what happened in the first creation to be repeated in the new creation. When the angels look down, He wants them to see the woman acting in subjection to the man, and indicating this outwardly by a covering on her head. We might pause here to state that the head-covering is simply an outward sign and it is of value only when it is the outward sign of an inward grace. In other words, a woman might have a covering on her head and yet not truly be submissive to her husband. In such a case, to wear a head-covering would be of no value at all. The most important thing is to be sure that the heart is truly subordinate; then a covering on a woman’s head becomes truly meaningful. 11:11 Paul is not implying that man is at all independent of the woman, so he adds: “Nevertheless, neither is man independent of woman, nor woman independent of man, in the Lord.” In other words, man and woman are mutually dependent. They need one another and the idea of subordination is not at all in conflict with the idea of mutual interdependence. 11:12 Woman came from man by creation, that is, she was created from Adam’s side. But Paul points out that man also comes through woman. Here he is referring to the process of birth. The woman gives birth to the man child. Thus God has created this perfect balance to indicate that the one cannot exist without the other. All things are from God means that He has divinely appointed all these things, so there is no just cause for complaint. Not only were these relationships created by God, but the purpose of them all is to glorify Him. All of this should make the man humble and the woman content. 11:13 The apostle now challenges the Corinthians to judge among themselves if it is proper for a woman to pray to God with her head uncovered. He appeals to their instinctive sense. The suggestion is that it is not reverent or decorous for a woman to enter into the presence of God unveiled. 11:14 Just how does nature itself teach us that it is a shame for a man to have long hair is not made clear. Some have suggested that a man’s hair will not naturally grow into as long tresses as a woman’s. For a man to have long hair makes him appear effeminate. In most cultures, the male wears his hair shorter than the female. 11:15 Verse 15 has been greatly misunderstood by many. Some have suggested that since a woman’s hair is given to her for a covering, it is not necessary for her to have any other covering. But such a teaching does grave violence to this portion of Scripture. Unless one sees that two coverings are mentioned in this chapter, the passage becomes hopelessly confusing. This may be demonstrated by referring back to verse 6. There we read: “For if a woman is not covered, let her also be shorn.” According to the interpretation just mentioned, this would mean that if a woman “does not have her hair on,” then she might just as well be shorn. But this is ridiculous. If she does not “have her hair on,” she could not possibly be shorn! The actual argument in verse 15 is that there is a real analogy between the spiritual and the natural. God gave woman a natural covering of glory in a way He did not give to man. There is a spiritual significance to this. It teaches that when a woman prays to God, she should wear a covering on her head. What is true in the natural sphere should be true in the spiritual. 11:16 The apostle closes this section with the statement: “But if anyone seems to be contentious, we have no such custom, nor do the churches of God.” Does Paul mean, as has been suggested, that the things he has just been saying are not important enough to contend about? Does he mean that there was no such custom of women veiling their heads in the churches? Does he mean that these teachings are optional and not to be pressed upon women as the commandments of the Lord? It seems strange that any such interpretations would ever be offered, yet they are commonly heard today. This would mean that Paul considered these instructions as of no real consequence, and he had just been wasting over half a chapter of Holy Scripture in setting them forth! There are at least two possible explanations of this verse which fit in with the rest of the Scripture. First of all, the apostle may be saying that he anticipates that certain ones will be contentious about these matters, but he adds that we have no such custom, that is, the custom of contending about this. We do not argue about such matters, but accept them as the teaching of the Lord. Another interpretation, favored by William Kelly, is that Paul was saying that the churches of God did not have any such custom as that of women praying or prophesying without being covered.
  6. Charles Spurgeon, Dr. Ryrie, Dr. John Phillips Dr. R.C. Sproul these are some of the best theologians support 1 Corinthians 11 1-16 head coverings for women while praying or prophesying in corporate worship.
  7. Great to see that you blow off half a chapter 1 Corinthians 11 1-16 of holy scripture as myth! 2 Timothy 3:16 (KJV) 16 All scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness: 3:16 The fact that Scripture is inspired by God (literally God-breathed, breathed out by God's own speech; see also Heb 4:12-13; 2 Pet 1:20-21) does not negate the active involvement of the human authors. But it does affirm that God is fully responsible for his word. Scripture is true, reliable, authoritative, permanent, and powerful because it comes from God himself. Its message is coherent, and it is consistent in its testimony about Jesus Christ (Luke 24:25-27, 44; John 5:39-40; Acts 3:24; 1 Cor 15:3-4). Thus it has the power to bring salvation and elicit faith. It must not be abused, as the false teachers had been doing (1 Tim 1:4-7; 2 Pet 3:16), but must be taught properly. As a consequence of inspiration, all Scripture is useful. Including 1 Corinthians 11 1-16 which some find inconvenient. Both the OT and the NT are together our guide and teacher in life.
  8. Hi Marilyn, I would like to thank you for contributing to the thread. I respect your current position yet I'm sorry but whomever told you that was simply wrong. The reasons given for the instructions in 1 Corinthians 11 1-16 were given by the Apostle Paul himself within the chapter and one never, never, never, never substitutes a different reason if one had already been given. If you study that passage you will see clearly that the reason for head coverings is due to the divine order and the angels. Because he invoked the divine order that makes the instructions for head covering for women trans-cultural. Meaning it transcends cultures like the principle of tithing. Tithing was done via the denariuos or shekel then, but now in US dollar. The underlying principle remains the same. Reading scripture in context is important, but we must be very careful not to use the cultural card on scripture. Also, the passage is not specifying married women. It is specifying women and men in a general sense. The entire chapter was in regards to corporate worship. The first 16 verses half a chapter of Holy Scripture had to do with head coverings for women, and the reasons why. The second half had to do with corrections regarding the Lord's supper. As I stated earlier another common argument against head coverings is that it was a custom at the time and does not apply to us today. Principles are those commands of God that apply to all people at all time in every culture and in every life situation. Customs are those things that are variant local applications of principles. For example, in the NT the principle of tithing was there and in those days it was done in the Denarius or the Shekel. Does that mean that the only way we can please God today is by paying our tithes in Denarius or Shekel? Of course not! The monetary unit was customary the clothing styles those are the things that are subject to change from culture to culture from place to place. The principle of modesty applies to all generations, but how that modesty is manifested will differ from one country to another and from one time to another. We understand that those things are customary. Many times, distinguishing between custom and principles is a relatively easy matter, but not always sometimes it is excruciatingly difficult to make that distinction. Here is the Principle to apply if you can't decide if something is a custom or principle. The biblical principle would be whatever is not of faith is a sin. The burden of proof is always going to be on those who argue that such and such a command is custom and not principle. If you are not sure then the principle that applies is treat it as a principle, because if you treat a custom as a principle then the only guilt you bear is being overly scrupulous, but if you take a principle of God and treat it as a local custom and don't observe it you have sinned against God. Every serious student of the Word of God first seeks to discover its meaning and standards and then, and only then, to bring practice into conformity with it. Biblical principles determine Biblical practice. A little bit about angels below: Summary: Angel, "messenger," is used of God, of men, and of an order of created spiritual beings whose chief attributes are strength and wisdom. 2Sa 14:20; Ps 103:20; Ps 104:4 In the O.T. the expression "the angel of the Lord" (sometimes "of God") usually implies the presence of Deity in angelic form. Gen 16:1-13; Gen 21:17-19; Gen 22:11-16; Gen 31:11-13; Ex 3:2-4; Judges 2:1; Judges 6:12-16; Judges 13:3-22. Though angels are spirits Ps 104:4; Heb 1:14 power is given them to become visible in the semblance of human form. Gen 19:1 cf Gen 19:5; Ex 3:2; Num 22:22-31; Judges 2:1; Judges 6:11, 22; Judges 13:3, 6; 1Ch 21:16, 20 Mat 1:20; Luke 1:26; John 20:12; Acts 7:30; Acts 12:7, 8 etc.). The word is always used in the masculine gender, though sex, in the human sense, is never ascribed to angels. Mat 22:30; Mark 12:25. They are exceedingly numerous. Mat 26:53; Heb 12:22; Rev 5:11; Ps 68:17 The power is inconceivable. 2Ki 19:35. Their place is about the throne of God. Rev 5:11; Rev 7:11 Their relation to the believer is that of "ministering spirits, sent forth to minister for them who shall be heirs of salvation," and this ministry has reference largely to the physical safety and well-being of believers. 1Ki 19:5; Ps 34:7; Ps 91:11; Dan 6:22; Mat 2:13, 19; Mat 4:11; Luke 22:43; Acts 5:19 Acts 12:7-10 From Heb 1:14; Mat 18:10; Ps 91:11 it would seem that this care for the heirs of salvation begins in infancy and continues through life. The angels observe us 1Co 4:9; Eph 3:10; Eccl 5:6 a fact which should influence conduct. They receive departing saints. Luke 16:22 Man is made "a little lower than the angels," and in incarnation Christ took "for a little "time" this lower place. Ps 8:4, 5; Heb 2:6, 9 that He might lift the believer into His own sphere above angels. Heb 2:9, 10 The angels are to accompany Christ in His second advent. Mat 25:31 To them will be committed the preparation of the judgment of the nations. Mat 13:30, 39, 41, 42 (See Note for Mat 25:32) The kingdom-age is not to be subject to angels, but to Christ and those for whom He was made a little lower than the angels. Heb 2:5 An archangel, Michael, is mentioned as having a particular relation to Israel and to the resurrections. Dan 10:13, 21; Dan 12:1, 2; Jude 1:9; 1Th 4:16 The only other angel whose name is revealed Gabriel, was employed in the most distinguished services. Dan 8:16; Dan 9:21; Luke 1:19, 26 Fallen angels. Two classes of these are mentioned: (1) "The angels which kept not their first estate [place], but left their own habitation," are "chained under darkness," awaiting judgment. 2Pe 2:4; Jude 1:5; 1Co 6:3; John 5:22 (See Note for Gen 6:4) (2) The angels who have Satan Gen 3:1. The origin of these is nowhere explicitly revealed. They may be identical with the demons. For Satan and his angels everlasting fire is prepared. Mat 25:41; Rev 20:10 1 Corinthians 11:1-16 (KJV) 1 Be ye followers of me, even as I also am of Christ. 2 Now I praise you, brethren, that ye remember me in all things, and keep the ordinances, as I delivered them to you. 3 But I would have you know, that the head of every man is Christ; and the head of the woman is the man; and the head of Christ is God. 4 Every man praying or prophesying, having his head covered, dishonoureth his head. 5 But every woman that prayeth or prophesieth with her head uncovered dishonoureth her head: for that is even all one as if she were shaven. 6 For if the woman be not covered, let her also be shorn: but if it be a shame for a woman to be shorn or shaven, let her be covered. 7 For a man indeed ought not to cover his head, forasmuch as he is the image and glory of God: but the woman is the glory of the man. 8 For the man is not of the woman; but the woman of the man. 9 Neither was the man created for the woman; but the woman for the man. 10 For this cause ought the woman to have power on her head because of the angels. 11 Nevertheless neither is the man without the woman, neither the woman without the man, in the Lord. 12 For as the woman is of the man, even so is the man also by the woman; but all things of God. 13 Judge in yourselves: is it comely that a woman pray unto God uncovered? 14 Doth not even nature itself teach you, that, if a man have long hair, it is a shame unto him? 15 But if a woman have long hair, it is a glory to her: for her hair is given her for a covering. 16 But if any man seem to be contentious, we have no such custom, neither the churches of God.
  9. None of that has anything to do with why Paul instructions to the Church found in 1 Corinthians 11 1-16 for women in corporate worship to use a veil for head covering. Are you even familiar with 1 Corinthians 11? The entire chapter was in regards to corporate worship. The first 16 verses half a chapter of Holy Scripture had to do with head coverings for women, and the reasons why. The second half had to do with corrections regarding the Lord's supper. Excerpt used for EDUCATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY: [John Phillips Commentary Series, The - Exploring 1 Corinthians: An Expository Commentary.] [The second part of Paul's question takes up the obvious counterpart to all this. It has to do with nature and a woman's hair, especially with its loveliness: "But if a woman have long hair, it is a glory to her: for her hair is given her for a covering" (11:15). Some have taken this verse as an excuse for annulling all the previous teaching on the need for a woman to wear a covering on her head when she prays or prophesies. That cannot be. Paul does not devote a dozen verses to building his case only to knock it down casually and carelessly in the last verse. The woman's long hair is indeed her covering—but it is not the covering under discussion in the previous verses. Paul uses a different word altogether here from the ones he has used elsewhere in the chapter. He uses the word peribolaion. It denotes something thrown around someone. It is a composite word made up of peri (around) and ballō (to throw). The thought behind the word is that a woman's long hair is a mantle, a wrapper, provided by nature for a woman's covering. Her hair, indeed, is her glory. Many women, indeed, know how to make the most of it and use it to advantage to catch the eye and excite the admiration (or envy) of others. As long hair on a man is a shame to him, so long hair on a woman is a glory to her. This only adds weight to Paul's previous ruling. The woman, when she prays or prophesies, must put another covering over this natural covering. When she stands up to participate in worship she must not draw attention to herself. She must not put her hair on display. That would draw attention away from her words to her person. Her glorious, natural covering must be veiled. Only in this way can she honorably participate in audible public worship. The man, then, is to have short hair, the woman is to have long hair. The man is to participate in public worship with his head uncovered, the woman is to participate in public worship with her head covered. The man, with his head uncovered, acknowledges the headship of Christ. The woman, with her head covered, acknowledges the headship of the man. Paul is through. However, he adds a final caution: "But if any man seem to be contentious, we have no such custom, neither the churches of God" (11:16). Paul, it seemed, realized that this teaching would be unpopular. He concludes with a sharp warning. The word for contentious here is philoneikos. It is a composite word made up of phileo (to love) and neikos (strife). It means to love strife or to enjoy squabbling. A companion word, philoeikia, is used to describe an incident in the Upper Room just after the Lord had instituted the communion feast, and just after He had bluntly stated that one of them would betray Him. We read "there was also a strife [philoneikia] among them, which of them should be accounted the greatest" (Luke 22:24). How sad! A love of strife leading to such an argument at such a time! Paul sensed this same un-Christlike spirit would motivate some to pick on his teaching and argue about it. "We have no such custom!" Paul bluntly declares. That is, we have no such custom, here or anywhere else in the churches, to quarrel, especially over divinely revealed truth. The subject matter he had been discussing was of the highest order. It was not open for debate by those who simply liked to argue for argument's sake.]
  10. I understand context quite a bit since I graduated seminary. I also understand in regards to 1 Corinthians 11 1-16 the rise of the feminist movement in our culture has made this portion of Scripture a veritable battleground.
  11. It is sorrowful to see a "christian" mocking half a chapter of Holy scripture 1 Corinthians 11 1-16
  12. https://www.sermonaudio.com/saplayer/playpopup.asp?SID=424030217 Part 1 https://www.sermonaudio.com/saplayer/playpopup.asp?SID=72503233756 Part 2 by Pastor Brian Schwertley Part 2 covers cultural issues. Christians should not come up with excuses not to follow 1 Corinthians 11 1-16 (head coverings) just to support their declension.
  13. https://www.sermonaudio.com/saplayer/playpopup.asp?SID=424030217 Part 1 https://www.sermonaudio.com/saplayer/playpopup.asp?SID=72503233756 Part 2 by Pastor Brian Schwertley Part 2 covers cultural issues. Christians should not come up with excuses not to follow 1 Corinthians 11 1-16 (head coverings) just to support their declension.
  14. Another argument that is seriously flawed is this one: [The Messiah's instruction on prayer is complete. To say that the Messiah is silent on the matter is to deny the Word of God for the Messiah is the Word of God.The Messiah said "When you pray, say: 'Father, hallowed be Your name. Your kingdom come. Give us each day our daily bread. And forgive us our sins, For we ourselves also forgive everyone who is indebted to us. And lead us not into temptation.'" (Luke 11:2-4).] i.e. Well Jesus didn't mention it in how we are to pray. Paul was appointed as an Apostle by the Messiah and given Apolistic authority and he spoke as he was so moved by the Holy Spirit. Hence, all of his writings to the church body are indeed authoritative. Here they are making an argument from silence. Just because Jesus did not mention head coverings it does not logically conclude that they are not required. I could very well claim that in the Lord's Prayer Jesus focused his attention on what to pray instead of what to wear while praying. Paul on the other hand, focused on what to wear rather than what to say while praying. Thus they do not contradict each other. All Scripture including all of Paul's letters to the churches are inspired by the Holy Spirit. The Holy Spirit and Jesus do not contradict each other. You propose an argument from silence which is one of the weakest arguments. Just because something is not mentioned in one passage of scripture does not preclude its instruction in other passages of scripture. In other words, you cannot use silence to rule out other specific passages of scripture that do address the subject at hand.
×
×
  • Create New...