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The_Patriot2019

Royal Member
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The_Patriot2019 last won the day on January 1 2016

The_Patriot2019 had the most liked content!

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About The_Patriot2019

  • Rank
    Royal Member
  • Birthday 02/27/1985

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Gotham city, Wyoming.
  • Interests
    Church, spending time with the family, Hunting, Fishing, shooting, camping, anything outdoors really, occasionally dabling in the finer arts of computers.

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  1. The_Patriot2019

    Project SkilletPC

    Ill show my system, this is the basic layout of most of my builds. (This is an older system dont judge lol dont mind the dust either) Motherboard: ASUS M4A89GTD PRO. CPU: AMD Phenom II 940 quadcore CPU RAM: 16 GB Patriot 1600 mhz ddr3 (4x 4 gb modules) Graphics: Saphire R9 390 nitro. Factory overclocked with 4 gigs of gddr4 ram PSU: Coolermaster 750 watt psu. Storage: 128 gb seagate SSD (primary) 500 gig hitachi HDD (Secondary) CPU cooler: Zalman CNPS10X All housed in a coolermaster CM 690 case with 5 120mm fans on the case of which maybe one is running at any given time, maybe 2 under a full load. I once ran 3dmark for over 24 hours straight on this system without ever approaching critical heat levels. Liquid cooling has never touched this system.
  2. The_Patriot2019

    Project SkilletPC

    I would say a solid air cooling heatsink like i linked will still more then do the job.
  3. The_Patriot2019

    Project SkilletPC

    I still say in your case liquid cooling is a waste of money...ive achieved 1 ghz overclocks on a air cooler similar to the one i linked you. The only time id consider liquid cooling is if i was planning on running a 1ghz+ overclock 100% of the time while running cpu heavy tasks. And then i wouldn't use integrated graphics. Or if i was going to be working it hard at stock speeds or above in an excessivy hot environment. But as long as your not planning on running it outside in the summer in Arizona and it doesn't sound like you really need the performance, so if i was you id forgo the liquid cooling altogether and stick with air cooling.
  4. The_Patriot2019

    Project SkilletPC

    If you have no intention of overclocking id toss out that liquid cooler and stick with the 2400, more bang for your buck if you ask me, because liquid cooling is really only needed if your planning on doing some serious overclocking.
  5. The_Patriot2019

    Is it just me .... the legacy continues ...

    well at least your not lazy....like certain other wanna be lasters in this group, but your still not last, even if you do qualify.
  6. The_Patriot2019

    Project SkilletPC

    that is correct, i didnt go further into detail on that end. thanks for further explaining it I think what skillet was meaning by "almost" is that the dedicated frees up more regular memory giving a performance boost in memory, hence the "almost"
  7. The_Patriot2019

    Project SkilletPC

    i always run dedicated Graphics personally, even if Im not planning on doing anything graphics intensive, just because it gives me better CPU and memory performance. Even a cheap0 40 buck graphics card will give you a a surprising boost in processing power.
  8. The_Patriot2019

    Project SkilletPC

    it does in the sense that your system isnt having to share any of its ram with the graphics card, so its performance is going to improve. Now if you have 16 gigs of ram and a integrated card, and all you use your computer for is solitaire and watching movies you will never notice the performance drop (never) as your not pushing your computer anywhere near its maximum potential, but you load up battlefield 4 and try to run it on full graphics, yes you will definetly notice the difference.
  9. The_Patriot2019

    Project SkilletPC

    its ok lol. no biggie sometimes things get lost in translation over forums. it happens.
  10. The_Patriot2019

    Project SkilletPC

    I did-you said nothing about a dedicated card. perhaps you should re-write your post?
  11. The_Patriot2019

    Project SkilletPC

    incorrect, with an integrated card you actually lose memory. So if you have 8 gig of ram, and have 1 gig set aside for the video card, you actually only have 7 gigs of system ram. (im just using that number for example, how much ram your integrated card uses depends on the chipset of the motherboard, and how much ram your system has. some motherboards even allow you to adjust it to your liking) This is one of the reasons dedicated cards actually improve your systems performance, as they have their own memory seperate from your your system memory. My video card on my computer has 4 gigs of video memory, that is dedicated ONLY to graphics, leaving all 16 gigs of my system memory just for my computers use.
  12. The_Patriot2019

    Project SkilletPC

    That would be up to you. I see no problem with the 2400g, its a solid 3.6 ghz quad core processor should have more then enough processing power for anything you need to do. If you want to save some money if you went with a 2 x 4 gb memory module pack youd shave 50 bucks off your price right there.
  13. The_Patriot2019

    Project SkilletPC

    The ryzen is a good CPU, I would stick with that. Im not a huge fan of the mini itx form factor, one because of its smaller size it makes finding a good power supply more expensive and 2 it makes cooling more difficult, and they have limited upgradeability. When I build a PC I usually prefer the full atx form factor for future upgradeability and cooling, but since your using integrated graphics, micro atx is more then fine and here is a couple motherboard choices that i would recommend. https://m.newegg.com/products/N82E16813145083 https://m.newegg.com/products/N82E16813119137 I dont know what your budget is, but with ram more is better. 8 would be sufficient but if you can afford it 16 is good. If you do 2 x 8 gig sticks, both the boards i listed both have 2 extra slots to add more in the future. https://m.newegg.com/products/N82E16820220977 I like your choice for PSU. Fully modular solid performer, id just stick with that evga PSU. However its not likely to work with that case you picked (neither will the motherboards i suggested) if you want a solid no frills case this one would work https://m.newegg.com/products/N82E16811119274 If you want a fancier one with lots of room for future expansion this would work: https://m.newegg.com/products/9SIA6ZP8MM8545 Theres nothing wrong with your choice of hard drive, and you might want to consider the following heatsink for your CPU. I haven't double checked the space requirements to make sure it will fit the cases i recomended but it should. https://m.newegg.com/products/N82E16835103277
  14. The_Patriot2019

    Is it just me .... the legacy continues ...

    no one cant take your last as you dont have it.
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