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ajchurney

Anyone curious about real Amish??

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The Amish have become a fairly popular subject of reality TV shows and docu-dramas. I happen to live in one of the largest Amish settlements in America in Northern Indiana, and I have visited many other Amish areas in the midwest repeatedly. I work side by side with Amish men, and I have my own side business driving them around anywhere they can't make it by their buggies (or just don't want to!). I have had long discussions with Amish bishops, and many of my close friends grew up Amish. I don't know everything about them, but I probably know more than the people who make those TV shows! Anyhow, I just thought it would be fun to offer to answer any questions the best I can for those unfamiliar with real Amish folks. You can also personal message me if you don't want others to scrutinize your question (there are some odd stories out there, not all of which are entirely true). I intend to be respectful of the Christian aspects of being Amish, but I won't shy away from truth if I am asked about some of the cultural stuff that they practice.

Teaser: The men kiss each other square on when they "holy kiss" (mints and/or gum suggested!)

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I used to live in Philadelphia.  I think I saw them walking barefoot in the streets one day.

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Hey Enoch!

Amish like to go barefoot more than most people. I have seen Amish teenagers running around the farm doing all kinds of chores barefoot that I wonder how their feet can take it! The Amish around here normally wear shoes in public. but many almost never at home

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Hey Enoch!

Amish like to go barefoot more than most people. I have seen Amish teenagers running around the farm doing all kinds of chores barefoot that I wonder how their feet can take it!

I believe a lot more people would walk barefoot if we had more ground and grass to walk on, and our parents didn't force us to put shoes on when we were younger.

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Hey Enoch!

Amish like to go barefoot more than most people. I have seen Amish teenagers running around the farm doing all kinds of chores barefoot that I wonder how their feet can take it!

I believe a lot more people would walk barefoot if we had more ground and grass to walk on, and our parents didn't force us to put shoes on when we were younger.

 

Personally, my feet are ugly, so I hide them most often lol

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What time in history do Amish believe is the time that technology stopped? Or if I rephrase that, what era are they living in?

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Hey Enoch!

Amish like to go barefoot more than most people. I have seen Amish teenagers running around the farm doing all kinds of chores barefoot that I wonder how their feet can take it!

I believe a lot more people would walk barefoot if we had more ground and grass to walk on, and our parents didn't force us to put shoes on when we were younger.

 

Personally, my feet are ugly, so I hide them most often lol

 

LoL   mine are tender.....   never liked to go barefoot

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What time in history do Amish believe is the time that technology stopped? Or if I rephrase that, what era are they living in?

Hi OakWood!

The Amish do not really claim a certain time period as Holy. They even use quite a bit of technology in many Amish settlements. Some examples are solar power, wind generators, and "skid loader" tractors. It is really entirely up to the leaders to decide what is acceptable and what is not. I am told that 100 years ago, you  could hardly tell the difference between Amish and other conservative Christians at the time. Nearly everyone drove horse and buggy and wore similar clothing. It was in the late 1800's and very early 1900's that certain Bishops began to equate technology with "the world" in the scriptures. This idea took hold, and by the mid 20th century was an entrenched tradition and defined the Amish more than anything else. 

The Amish have a meeting in each local church district (divided strictly by geographic bounds encompassing a certain number of families) each year called "rules and regs" (english translation loosely). It is during this meeting that they discuss and decide on any new prohibitions, but seldom if ever lift any of the existing ones, though at times they make exceptions or change something. One thing that has changed much in recent decades is that most of the larger Amish settlements allow the Amish businesses to use all kinds of technology and machinery. This can include cell phones, computerized machinery, heavy construction equipment, power generators, and much more. The strange thing is that often the Amish are allowed to use all kinds of things in their business that they cannot have in the house. If it involves making money, apparently the Lord is OK with it, but not if it is only for use in the home!??!

The Amish are not so much trying to live in another time period, it's just that they value "simplicity" and try to shun things that are too fancy or deemed unnecessary extravagances. Once you get to know them, though, you find that most of them love really nice and expensive things, and they just attempt to keep it within the boundaries (just barely!) of what the rules dictate. I could go into much detail about thousand dollar barbecue grills, ten thousand dollar special breed horses, five thousand dollar lawn mowers, and many other "acceptable" extravagances that many Amish indulge in. They are also famous for their rich and fattening foods......another story!!

There are very conservative and staunchly backward Amish, but only in smaller groups, usually separated from the majority Amish. 

Edited by ajchurney
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What time in history do Amish believe is the time that technology stopped? Or if I rephrase that, what era are they living in?

Hi OakWood!

The Amish do not really claim a certain time period as Holy. They even use quite a bit of technology in many Amish settlements. Some examples are solar power, wind generators, and "skid loader" tractors. It is really entirely up to the leaders to decide what is acceptable and what is not. I am told that 100 years ago, you  could hardly tell the difference between Amish and other conservative Christians at the time. Nearly everyone drove horse and buggy and wore similar clothing. It was in the late 1800's and very early 1900's that certain Bishops began to equate technology with "the world" in the scriptures. This idea took hold, and by the mid 20th century was an entrenched tradition and defined the Amish more than anything else. 

The Amish have a meeting in each local church district (divided strictly by geographic bounds encompassing a certain number of families) each year called "rules and regs" (english translation loosely). It is during this meeting that they discuss and decide on any new prohibitions, but seldom if ever lift any of the existing ones, though at times they make exceptions or change something. One thing that has changed much in recent decades is that most of the larger Amish settlements allow the Amish businesses to use all kinds of technology and machinery. This can include cell phones, computerized machinery, heavy construction equipment, power generators, and much more. The strange thing is that often the Amish are allowed to use all kinds of things in their business that they cannot have in the house. If it involves making money, apparently the Lord is OK with it, but not if it is only for use in the home!??!

The Amish are not so much trying to live in another time period, it's just that they value "simplicity" and try to shun things that are too fancy or deemed unnecessary extravagances. Once you get to know them, though, you find that most of them love really nice and expensive things, and they just attempt to keep it within the boundaries (just barely!) of what the rules dictate. I could go into much detail about thousand dollar barbecue grills, ten thousand dollar special breed horses, five thousand dollar lawn mowers, and many other "acceptable" extravagances that many Amish indulge in. They are also famous for their rich and fattening foods......another story!!

There are very conservative and staunchly backward Amish, but only in smaller groups, usually separated from the majority Amish. 

 

 

Thanks. That's the sort of answer that I was looking for.

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<snip>

 One thing that has changed much in recent decades is that most of the larger Amish settlements allow the Amish businesses to use all kinds of technology and machinery. This can include cell phones, computerized machinery, heavy construction equipment, power generators, and much more. The strange thing is that often the Amish are allowed to use all kinds of things in their business that they cannot have in the house. If it involves making money, apparently the Lord is OK with it, but not if it is only for use in the home!??!

 

The Amish are not so much trying to live in another time period, it's just that they value "simplicity" and try to shun things that are too fancy or deemed unnecessary extravagances. Once you get to know them, though, you find that most of them love really nice and expensive things, and they just attempt to keep it within the boundaries (just barely!) of what the rules dictate. I could go into much detail about thousand dollar barbecue grills, ten thousand dollar special breed horses, five thousand dollar lawn mowers, and many other "acceptable" extravagances that many Amish indulge in. They are also famous for their rich and fattening foods......another story!!

There are very conservative and staunchly backward Amish, but only in smaller groups, usually separated from the majority Amish. 

 

 

There is a lot of wisdom in what some of the Amish groups do regarding the use of technology is business. Wisdom perhaps many others could use to their benefit. Keeping the unnecessary stuff (technology included) out of your home could be a good thing when it comes to certain things. Television comes to mind here. Now, I'm not advocating tossing the TV, but not having one has some benefits for families who choose to do that. Some close the set up in a cabinet that's only open when the set is being used. These folks also tend to spend more time actually talking to their kids, playing instruments, singing, and otherwise building relationships within the family as our ancestors once did. That's a good thing in my book.

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