Bonky

Confused about prophecy

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I never really explored biblical prophecy in great detail but lately I've been a little more curious.   I was listening to Matt Dillahunty discuss prophecy and what he thinks constitutes a meaningful/valid prophecy.   I felt that he had some fair points that he made.  For example:

The prophecy must not predict likely events.

The prophecy shouldn't be vague

The prophecy must somehow be falsifiable or verifiable. etc

I was browsing the prophecy board and I see various discussions about various prophecies, what I also see are opinions about the who/what/where of these prophecies.  Nothing seems to be able to be nailed down and settled.  I'm just interested in understanding what value these prophecies have if everyone and their cat can claim what they think it means but nobody really knows.  

I'm aware that there are prophecies in the OT that people claim actually came true, once again I haven't examined all of these in great detail but I recall the ones I was shown to one degree or another don't satisfy the requirements [partially] listed above.  

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That is a good question.  Understanding prophecy is a process.  I think it is one of the fun things about continuing to grow in Christ.  It is like a treasure hunt, I guess you could say.  However, it is also something that takes a degree of spiritual maturity and not everyone discussing prophecy is ready, I guess you could say.  I don't say that to offend anyone.  So, understanding prophecy well is like aging cheese.  It has to sit on a shelf, while the basic things that are important to inheriting eternal life are understood and penetrate deeply into your soul. 

So, the discussion of prophecy is a reflection of different stages of growth within the body.  The only thing I have a problem with is when people think they are right about prophecy for the last 10 years.  To me, that means that aren't growing as a Christian.  I don't think anyone who is growing in Christ has the same opinion about prophecy for 10 years.  There is always something new to learn about the prophecy, but this requires learning something new about salvation, baptism, and making your whole life an offering to God.  Then you will know His will so that you may prove what the will of God is, that which is good and acceptable and perfect (Romans 12:2) which is the definition of prophecy.  The prophecy is the perfect will of God. 

There are a couple examples from the Old Testament of fulfilled prophecy, which can help us understand what the fulfillment of prophecy looks like.  There was a prophecy given to Abraham that his descendants would be enslaved and oppressed in a foreign land for 400 years describing the time leading up to the exodus (Genesis 15:13). 

The book of Revelation reflects a lot of the same things as the fulfillment of the prophecy did.  For example, the way the hardness of Pharaoh’s heart compares to the disposition of the beast.  Many of the plagues appear to be repeated in the book of Revelation as well. 

Then, my favorite fulfilled prophecy for comparison is from Jeremiah.  I love Jeremiah’s prophecy for comparison.  He represents so much from his testimony and perseverance.  No one listens to him, but he just keeps going, and in doing so he is able to escape being taken into captivity (Jeremiah 40:1-6). 

But keep on the alert at all times, praying that you may have strength to escape all these things that are about to take place, and to stand before the Son of Man,”(Luke 21:36). 

So, there are many valuable things to learn from the prophecy even while we wait to see the whole thing manifest. 

Take care.   

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I never really explored biblical prophecy in great detail but lately I've been a little more curious.   I was listening to Matt Dillahunty discuss prophecy and what he thinks constitutes a meaningful/valid prophecy.   I felt that he had some fair points that he made.  For example:

The prophecy must not predict likely events.

The prophecy shouldn't be vague

The prophecy must somehow be falsifiable or verifiable. etc

I was browsing the prophecy board and I see various discussions about various prophecies, what I also see are opinions about the who/what/where of these prophecies.  Nothing seems to be able to be nailed down and settled.  I'm just interested in understanding what value these prophecies have if everyone and their cat can claim what they think it means but nobody really knows.  

I'm aware that there are prophecies in the OT that people claim actually came true, once again I haven't examined all of these in great detail but I recall the ones I was shown to one degree or another don't satisfy the requirements [partially] listed above.  

You are a nonbeliever.Do you care about prophecy?Have you read the book of Revelation?

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I never really explored biblical prophecy in great detail but lately I've been a little more curious.   I was listening to Matt Dillahunty discuss prophecy and what he thinks constitutes a meaningful/valid prophecy.   I felt that he had some fair points that he made.  For example:

The prophecy must not predict likely events.

The prophecy shouldn't be vague

The prophecy must somehow be falsifiable or verifiable. etc

I was browsing the prophecy board and I see various discussions about various prophecies, what I also see are opinions about the who/what/where of these prophecies.  Nothing seems to be able to be nailed down and settled.  I'm just interested in understanding what value these prophecies have if everyone and their cat can claim what they think it means but nobody really knows.  

I'm aware that there are prophecies in the OT that people claim actually came true, once again I haven't examined all of these in great detail but I recall the ones I was shown to one degree or another don't satisfy the requirements [partially] listed above.  

You are a nonbeliever.Do you care about prophecy?Have you read the book of Revelation?

Any believer is formally a non-believer.   I'm interested in examining prophecies yes.   I haven't read any scripture from Revelation in a number of years.   Revelation seems to be source of a lot of debate and discussion.   Which kind of goes to my point, if a prophecy or set of prophecies is up for debate, then were/are they of any value? 

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I never really explored biblical prophecy in great detail but lately I've been a little more curious.   I was listening to Matt Dillahunty discuss prophecy and what he thinks constitutes a meaningful/valid prophecy.   I felt that he had some fair points that he made.  For example:

The prophecy must not predict likely events.

The prophecy shouldn't be vague

The prophecy must somehow be falsifiable or verifiable. etc

I was browsing the prophecy board and I see various discussions about various prophecies, what I also see are opinions about the who/what/where of these prophecies.  Nothing seems to be able to be nailed down and settled.  I'm just interested in understanding what value these prophecies have if everyone and their cat can claim what they think it means but nobody really knows.  

I'm aware that there are prophecies in the OT that people claim actually came true, once again I haven't examined all of these in great detail but I recall the ones I was shown to one degree or another don't satisfy the requirements [partially] listed above.  

You are a nonbeliever.Do you care about prophecy?Have you read the book of Revelation?

 

Any believer is formally a non-believer.   I'm interested in examining prophecies yes.   I haven't read any scripture from Revelation in a number of years.   Revelation seems to be source of a lot of debate and discussion.   Which kind of goes to my point, if a prophecy or set of prophecies is up for debate, then were/are they of any value? 

I'm not sure why you would say all believers are formally nonbelievers.  I surely am not formally a nonbeliever, just speaking for myself.  Care to explain?

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MorningGlory you said:

I'm not sure why you would say all believers are formally nonbelievers.  I surely am not formally a nonbeliever, just speaking for myself.  Cae to explain?

Any day before you accepted Christ as your savior was a day you were not a believer.  Another words you weren't born a believer correct? 

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I never really explored biblical prophecy in great detail but lately I've been a little more curious.   I was listening to Matt Dillahunty discuss prophecy and what he thinks constitutes a meaningful/valid prophecy.   I felt that he had some fair points that he made.  For example:

The prophecy must not predict likely events.

The prophecy shouldn't be vague

The prophecy must somehow be falsifiable or verifiable. etc

I was browsing the prophecy board and I see various discussions about various prophecies, what I also see are opinions about the who/what/where of these prophecies.  Nothing seems to be able to be nailed down and settled.  I'm just interested in understanding what value these prophecies have if everyone and their cat can claim what they think it means but nobody really knows.  

I'm aware that there are prophecies in the OT that people claim actually came true, once again I haven't examined all of these in great detail but I recall the ones I was shown to one degree or another don't satisfy the requirements [partially] listed above.  

You are a nonbeliever.Do you care about prophecy?Have you read the book of Revelation?

 

Any believer is formally a non-believer.   I'm interested in examining prophecies yes.   I haven't read any scripture from Revelation in a number of years.   Revelation seems to be source of a lot of debate and discussion.   Which kind of goes to my point, if a prophecy or set of prophecies is up for debate, then were/are they of any value? 

I'm not sure why you would say all believers are formally nonbelievers.  I surely am not formally a nonbeliever, just speaking for myself.  Cae to explain?

I am confused by that too Morning.I was never a nonbeliever but I was not exposed to God in my younger years.I was always curious about Him and had questions.

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MorningGlory you said:

I'm not sure why you would say all believers are formally nonbelievers.  I surely am not formally a nonbeliever, just speaking for myself.  Cae to explain?

Any day before you accepted Christ as your savior was a day you were not a believer.  Another words you weren't born a believer correct? 

I definitely was not an unbeliever when I was born.How can a baby have that opportunity?You are just bringing up a bunch of atheist propaganda.  

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I don't want to get off track but until the day that you are a believer you were formerly a non-believer.   I don't know how this doesn't make sense.  You weren't a Christian at 2 weeks old when all you did was sleep and nurse lol

MorningGlory you said:

I'm not sure why you would say all believers are formally nonbelievers.  I surely am not formally a nonbeliever, just speaking for myself.  Cae to explain?

Any day before you accepted Christ as your savior was a day you were not a believer.  Another words you weren't born a believer correct? 

I definitely was not an unbeliever when I was born.How can a baby have that opportunity?You are just bringing up a bunch of atheist propaganda.  

I don't know why everyone is so sensitive about this.  This is bizarre, what is so bad about admitting that you were a non-believer before being a believer?  It's not like your salvation is at stake for agreeing with that.  At any rate, all I was trying to say was that just because I'm a non-believer now it doesn't mean I will be tomorrow or a week or a month from now.  Accusing me of "atheist propaganda" is rather rude.  The proper thing would be to ask me to explain myself more to maybe understand what I'm saying rather than assume the worst and try to paint me as some trouble maker.  

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I don't want to get off track but until the day that you are a believer you were formerly a non-believer.   I don't know how this doesn't make sense.  You weren't a Christian at 2 weeks old when all you did was sleep and nurse lol

MorningGlory you said:

I'm not sure why you would say all believers are formally nonbelievers.  I surely am not formally a nonbeliever, just speaking for myself.  Cae to explain?

Any day before you accepted Christ as your savior was a day you were not a believer.  Another words you weren't born a believer correct? 

I definitely was not an unbeliever when I was born.How can a baby have that opportunity?You are just bringing up a bunch of atheist propaganda.  

 

I don't know why everyone is so sensitive about this.  This is bizarre, what is so bad about admitting that you were a non-believer before being a believer?  It's not like your salvation is at stake for agreeing with that.  At any rate, all I was trying to say was that just because I'm a non-believer now it doesn't mean I will be tomorrow or a week or a month from now.  Accusing me of "atheist propaganda" is rather rude.  The proper thing would be to ask me to explain myself more to maybe understand what I'm saying rather than assume the worst and try to paint me as some trouble maker.  

When a baby dies they go to heaven.Up to a certain age all children go to heaven until they have the opportunity to accept Christ into their life.After that they will go to hell if they die if they are capable of choosing Christ as their Lord and Savior and they deny Him.

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