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Kan

How to cut a Mango

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Get the most out of your mango.

Mangos generally have a large seed to which the flesh will hold, similar to a cling peach. So people will cut the flesh away with a sharp knife, but here is where a little trick will give you larger cuts without the annoying leftovers on each side of the seed, which we also want to eat, but by the time it is all cut off, we have a few mashed bits hardly worth the wait.

We cut the mango from the base to the tip, so it is held onto the cutting board the way it hangs in the tree.

Instead of cutting off the larger sides, cut the fruit in a diamond shape, starting on one edge and going around to the next in order, this will give you four large pieces, instead of two pieces with mush and a seed hanging onto the rest.

Viewed from the top the seed can fit into a diamond shape, with practice, you'll know the exact angle to cut. Don't forget to follow the curved contour of the seed as you cut down the length.

 

mango.jpg

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Thanks for this. I love Mangoes and they are so healthy. Great to put in a smoothy with peaches. It was always kind of a dilemma on how to cut them so thanks. :)

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How to cut a pineapple

Once again pineapples are typically cut in slices across the length of the fruit. This means that every slice is different in taste, from sour to sweet. The slices at the top end of the pineapple are sour, or not as sweet, and usually more porous, with a dryer flesh.

And the center of a pineapple can be quite woody and sour, that's why the center is typically cut out in canned fruit.

Remove the head of leaves, and cut the skin off both ends, then cut the skin off in slices from top to bottom. Do this on a baking tray, so that you catch all the juice.

Then cut the pineapple in slices from top to bottom just to one side of the center, so you miss the hard part. Now you should have a few long cuts, these can be sliced in length again to give you even pieces. And you can discard the center piece.

These long pieces give your guest a choice of how to eat it, and if to leave the sour end. A good pineapple is all sweet, but imported fruits don't always have that quality.

You can also cut the longer pieces into smaller edible pieces, which can be mixed into a fruit salad, so that the sour pieces are sweetened by the rest.

 

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2 hours ago, Kan said:

How to cut a pineapple

Once again pineapples are typically cut in slices across the length of the fruit. This means that every slice is different in taste, from sour to sweet. The slices at the top end of the pineapple are sour, or not as sweet, and usually more porous, with a dryer flesh.

And the center of a pineapple can be quite woody and sour, that's why the center is typically cut out in canned fruit.

Remove the head of leaves, and cut the skin off both ends, then cut the skin off in slices from top to bottom. Do this on a baking tray, so that you catch all the juice.

Then cut the pineapple in slices from top to bottom just to one side of the center, so you miss the hard part. Now you should have a few long cuts, these can be sliced in length again to give you even pieces. And you can discard the center piece.

These long pieces give your guest a choice of how to eat it, and if to leave the sour end. A good pineapple is all sweet, but imported fruits don't always have that quality.

You can also cut the longer pieces into smaller edible pieces, which can be mixed into a fruit salad, so that the sour pieces are sweetened by the rest.

 

I have mastered how to cut a pineapple. There is a little tag that comes on a lot of pineapples that gives a good picture demonstration of how it should be done. I love fresh pineapple. I tend to get organic. The last nonorganic pineapple I got tasted somewhat strange.

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5 hours ago, bopeep1909 said:

I have mastered how to cut a pineapple. There is a little tag that comes on a lot of pineapples that gives a good picture demonstration of how it should be done. I love fresh pineapple. I tend to get organic. The last nonorganic pineapple I got tasted somewhat strange.

I've got a feeling you love tropical fruit in general.

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8 hours ago, Kan said:

I've got a feeling you love tropical fruit in general.

Yes I do. I have been to Hawaii and they have the best Papaya,pineapple,guava.

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18 hours ago, bopeep1909 said:

Yes I do. I have been to Hawaii and they have the best Papaya,pineapple,guava.

I'm talking to the wrong people about how to cut fruit...:blink: 

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Thanks for the tips.

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On 6/11/2016 at 10:08 PM, Kan said:

How to cut a pineapple

Once again pineapples are typically cut in slices across the length of the fruit. This means that every slice is different in taste, from sour to sweet. The slices at the top end of the pineapple are sour, or not as sweet, and usually more porous, with a dryer flesh.

And the center of a pineapple can be quite woody and sour, that's why the center is typically cut out in canned fruit.

Remove the head of leaves, and cut the skin off both ends, then cut the skin off in slices from top to bottom. Do this on a baking tray, so that you catch all the juice.

Then cut the pineapple in slices from top to bottom just to one side of the center, so you miss the hard part. Now you should have a few long cuts, these can be sliced in length again to give you even pieces. And you can discard the center piece.

These long pieces give your guest a choice of how to eat it, and if to leave the sour end. A good pineapple is all sweet, but imported fruits don't always have that quality.

You can also cut the longer pieces into smaller edible pieces, which can be mixed into a fruit salad, so that the sour pieces are sweetened by the rest.

 

 

Hi Kan, I love pineapple but fresh pineapple doesn't love me, it makes my lips bleed and it hurts my tongue :(

And I have a little gadget to cut pineapple :):emot-heartbeat:

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11 hours ago, angels4u said:

Hi Kan, I love pineapple but fresh pineapple doesn't love me, it makes my lips bleed and it hurts my tongue :(

And I have a little gadget to cut pineapple :):emot-heartbeat:

Is that because you get tart/green pineapples, or because your mouth comes into contact with the skin?

I have pineapple farms all around me, and we get them ripe, when the flesh is very sweet and starts to go into a deep translucent yellow. 

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