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Yowm

Future sins of the believer.

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@Yowm Hi. The parable of the unforgiving servant is an object lesson for all men at all times and goes deeper than simply an instruction on how servants are to relate to their master. The servant was forgiven...lock, stock, and barrel, before his altercation with his fellow servant, and while he was yet in an unsanctified state.  So also are we. "While we were yet sinners, Christ died for us." Forgiven, atoned for, redeemed, our relationship with our Master made clean and clear as if we had never sinned. But the servant, in that redeemed condition, chose not to act accordingly to someone else. Yes, he still had baggage. He still had an unsanctified carnal nature which required a degree of maturing and growing. But the extent and size of the original debt, and the insignificance of the second debt, in the eyes of the Master, in the eyes of the Father, should have had an immediate life-changing effect on the forgiven servant. Thus while he was forgiven, he was unconverted. While justified by the self sacrificial mercy of the Master, though he had the choice, refused to exercise the prerogative and privilege to show the fruit of his experience, and thus as an unfruitful branch, was cut off, no doubt to be burnt until his former debt paid.

I am not being arrogant or self righteous in suggesting that anyone who believes this parable reveals anything other than the possibility of losing ones salvation,though previously justified, is reading into the narrative a concept that simply does not show itself in any way,shape, or form. Why people would take such a stand ought to be something they should seriously consider. For example, is OSAS a "get out of jail free card" they imagine would save them from earnestly and seriously turning away from a known sin that they would deep in their hearts rather cherish? Because that one parable, among other lessons taught by Jesus, declares otherwise.

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3 minutes ago, brakelite said:

@Yowm Hi. The parable of the unforgiving servant is an object lesson for all men at all times and goes deeper than simply an instruction on how servants are to relate to their master. The servant was forgiven...lock, stock, and barrel, before his altercation with his fellow servant, and while he was yet in an unsanctified state.  So also are we. "While we were yet sinners, Christ died for us." Forgiven, atoned for, redeemed, our relationship with our Master made clean and clear as if we had never sinned. But the servant, in that redeemed condition, chose not to act accordingly to someone else. Yes, he still had baggage. He still had an unsanctified carnal nature which required a degree of maturing and growing. But the extent and size of the original debt, and the insignificance of the second debt, in the eyes of the Master, in the eyes of the Father, should have had an immediate life-changing effect on the forgiven servant. Thus while he was forgiven, he was unconverted. While justified by the self sacrificial mercy of the Master, though he had the choice, refused to exercise the prerogative and privilege to show the fruit of his experience, and thus as an unfruitful branch, was cut off, no doubt to be burnt until his former debt paid.

I am not being arrogant or self righteous in suggesting that anyone who believes this parable reveals anything other than the possibility of losing ones salvation,though previously justified, is reading into the narrative a concept that simply does not show itself in any way,shape, or form. Why people would take such a stand ought to be something they should seriously consider. For example, is OSAS a "get out of jail free card" they imagine would save them from earnestly and seriously turning away from a known sin that they would deep in their hearts rather cherish? Because that one parable, among other lessons taught by Jesus, declares otherwise.

I find it difficult in equating that servant with a born again Christian mainly for the fact that there is no indication he had a change of heart as the regenerate does. As a matter of fact he showed the opposite trait in that he immediately went into a state of unforgiveness revealing his evil nature and/or not understanding the forgiveness already given him.

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31 minutes ago, Yowm said:

I find it difficult in equating that servant with a born again Christian mainly for the fact that there is no indication he had a change of heart as the regenerate does. As a matter of fact he showed the opposite trait in that he immediately went into a state of unforgiveness revealing his evil nature and/or not understanding the forgiveness already given him.

Exactly!! My point precisely. He was unconverted...unregenerate...held the carnal baggage of sin and evil habits and character traits...yet he was forgiven! Completely and utterly exonerated of all his debt. Just as fully redeemed as any sinner. But he blew it, by not forgiving his fellow servant...and My heavenly Father will not forgive you except  you forgive others...even though your sins  had been previously laid upon My Son.

It is true that all our sins, past, present, and future, were laid upon our beloved Savior. What is more, we can approach Him and receive that blessed forgiveness personally, go out from His presence, and refuse to allow that blessedness to have its desired effect by growing fruit. Remember, in another illustration Jesus described the branch firmly grafted into the vine. Yet when it didn't produce fruit, it was broken off and destroyed. Neither of these illustrations depict a sinner who had not previously received and benefited from atonement. They both reveal a saved sinner losing his salvation because being judged by his works, he was condemned.

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1 hour ago, brakelite said:

They both reveal a saved sinner losing his salvation because being judged by his works, he was condemned.

Like I like to say, 'they lost their salvation because it was their's and not the Lord's'. He completes what He begins.

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