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firestormx

Jewish Perspective of the temple destruction?

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On 8/27/2017 at 3:05 PM, firestormx said:

I was curious if someone could help me with a question. What was the Jewish perspective for the reason for the destruction of the temple in 70ad? When Solomon's temple was destroyed, there were prophecies about it. Many Godly people had spoken and foretold its coming if there was not repentance. But not so with the 70 AD destruction. From the Jewish perspective, the words of Jesus didn't count. They were rebelling against a foreign power to serve God only. Temple participation was going strong.  There was not a lot of Idolatry from the Jewish People. So from the Jewish perspective ( a Jew who doesn't believe Jesus is the Messiah ), Why did God allow the destruction of the temple and scattering of his people?  

I get the question and I've heard the Rabbis have ways of talking around everything but a person I know who is involved with evangelizing Jews and most likely will answer well when he is available do to a sometimes hectic schedule is Jacob Prasch, you can write to him thru Moriel Ministries and if he can not answer right away someone may handle the question for him. You can e-mail him in England or go thru the USA office in Pittsburgh.

They may even have a teaching on the web dealing with the subject, maybe Daniel 9 if they did one.

Google Moriel.org and send the question.

Edited by Zemke

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5 minutes ago, firestormx said:

well, to explain their captivity to Babylon and Assyria they can turn to the Prophets in the Word of God. I don't believe they can do that with the destruction of the 2nd temple. Which is why I'm curious and asking here. Thanks for all the questions. They have helped refine my questions so others may more clearly so what I'm trying to ask. So thanks.

I see no difference. They didn't believe Jeremiah and Isaiah who foretold their captivity nor did they believe Jesus who foretold the Temple's destruction. They were all Prophets...Jesus just a bit more so.

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Just now, Zemke said:

I get the question and I've heard the Rabbis have ways of talking around everything but a person I know who is involved with evangelizing Jews and most likely will answer well when he is available do to a sometimes hectic schedule is Jacob Prasch, you can write to him thru Moriel Ministries and if he can not answer right away someone may handle the question for him. You can e-mail him in England or go thru the USA office in Pittsburgh.

They may even have a teaching on the web dealing with the subject, maybe Daniel 9 if they did one.

I'll look into, thanks. There are many here who I believe is Jewish so I figured after coming up short in my own research, maybe someone here could point me in the right direction even if they can't answer. Thanks for pointing me somewhere I might be able to get an answer. That is actually how I come upon the question. If I was ministering to A non-believing Jew. What would he say the reason the temple was destroyed is.

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2 minutes ago, Yowm said:

I see no difference. They didn't believe Jeremiah and Isaiah who foretold their captivity nor did they believe Jesus who foretold the Temple's destruction. They were all Prophets...Jesus just a bit more so.

Well, thanks for the conversation. I really enjoyed it. Your input has really helped me refine my question. thanks

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9 minutes ago, firestormx said:

I'll look into, thanks. There are many here who I believe is Jewish so I figured after coming up short in my own research, maybe someone here could point me in the right direction even if they can't answer. Thanks for pointing me somewhere I might be able to get an answer. That is actually how I come upon the question. If I was ministering to A non-believing Jew. What would he say the reason the temple was destroyed is.

This is a subject he has passion for, I've heard him say he would rather be evangelizing than what he is doing but God has him where he is. David in Pittsburgh could be of much help also.

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13 minutes ago, Zemke said:

This is a subject he has passion for, I've heard him say he would rather be evangelizing than what he is doing but God has him where he is. David in Pittsburgh could be of much help also.

Thanks for helping

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On 8/27/2017 at 3:05 PM, firestormx said:

I was curious if someone could help me with a question. What was the Jewish perspective for the reason for the destruction of the temple in 70ad? When Solomon's temple was destroyed, there were prophecies about it. Many Godly people had spoken and foretold its coming if there was not repentance. But not so with the 70 AD destruction. From the Jewish perspective, the words of Jesus didn't count. They were rebelling against a foreign power to serve God only. Temple participation was going strong.  There was not a lot of Idolatry from the Jewish People. So from the Jewish perspective ( a Jew who doesn't believe Jesus is the Messiah ), Why did God allow the destruction of the temple and scattering of his people?  

Very briefly.  They believed there were signs that showed them that the beginning of a religion without the Temple were given for 40 years.  

I wrote a devotional on the signs and its connection to Yom Kippur.  I don't have time right now to find the exact post, but this is a link that will get you started.  Its in one of those.

https://www.worthydevotions.com/christian/yom-kippur

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44 minutes ago, Zemke said:

I get the question and I've heard the Rabbis have ways of talking around everything but a person I know who is involved with evangelizing Jews and most likely will answer well when he is available do to a sometimes hectic schedule is Jacob Prasch, you can write to him thru Moriel Ministries and if he can not answer right away someone may handle the question for him. You can e-mail him in England or go thru the USA office in Pittsburgh.

They may even have a teaching on the web dealing with the subject, maybe Daniel 9 if they did one.

Google Moriel.org and send the question.

Yes, Prasch is a pretty good source.

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4 minutes ago, George said:

Very briefly.  They believed there were signs that showed them that the beginning of a religion without the Temple were given for 40 years.  

I wrote a devotional on the signs and its connection to Yom Kippur.  I don't have time right now to find the exact post, but this is a link that will get you started.  Its in one of those.

https://www.worthydevotions.com/christian/yom-kippur

I will look into it, thanks

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This is the devotion I referred to --

Enter His Presence, You're Completely Covered!

Hebrews 9:24-28 For Christ has not entered the holy places made with hands, which are copies of the true, but into heaven itself, now to appear in the presence of God for us; not that He should offer Himself often, as the high priest enters the Most Holy Place every year with blood of another-- He then would have had to suffer often since the foundation of the world; but now, once at the end of the ages, He has appeared to put away sin by the sacrifice of Himself. And as it is appointed for men to die once, but after this the judgment, so Christ was offered once to bear the sins of many. To those who eagerly wait for Him He will appear a second time, apart from sin, for salvation.

Yom Kippur, which literally means Day of Coverings, can be a day of deep reflection on what the Lord has done for us. As Yeshua (Jesus) died on the cross 2000 years ago, the Gospel describes how the veil in the Temple was torn in two. This profound spiritual event reveals that the Lord gave all whose sins are covered by His blood access to the Holy of Holies, as He had become our High Priest in addition to being, Himself, the perfect sacrifice for sin.

Although the Temple was not finally destroyed until 70 AD, Orthodox Judiasm recounts in the Talmud that, beginning in 30 AD, God no longer accepted the animal sacrifices commanded in the Torah for the Day of Atonement, [Tract Yoma 39b]. Throughout the ages, while the Temple stood, the High Priest would cast lots for the two goats which were to be offered as sacrifices on Yom Kippur. One lot was for the goat to be sacrificed on the altar, for YHVH -- and the other, called "Azazel", the goat cast out into the wilderness for the removal of sins [Leviticus 16:7-10].

Traditionally, as the Priest cast the lot, finding it in his right hand was a good omen, indicating that God had accepted the sacrifice. However, if the High Priest drew it in his left hand, this indicated the Lord's displeasure and even rejection of the sacrifice. For the 40 years after the sacrifice of Yeshua, the Talmud records that the lot was taken in the left hand of the High Priest. The same result for 40 years, a lot cast into the left hand, carries a statistical probability of 1 in 1,099,511,627,776 -- or one in a trillion chance!

There were also other significant miraculous signs described in this tract, that something of major significance had taken place related to the most critical sacrifice in the Temple order. It is clear to both Jews and Messianic believers that God was saying something important to the Jewish people in 30AD; something important enough to be recorded in the Talmud and something which demanded an explanation.

We believe that the destruction of the Temple in 70 AD, 40 years after the sacrifice of Yeshua, followed a period of testimony and testing for the Jewish people concerning the fact that the sacrificial system had been consummated by Yeshua's death on the cross. 40 is a typical number of testing throughout the Bible.

While animal sacrifices continued to be offered in the Temple while it stood, and many believing Jews continued to participate in them, it was clear that something new and definitive had opened the way for all people to enter the Holiest place and to know the Lord intimately and personally. Without intending to, the Talmud offers historical support for the significance and reality of the events in 30 AD which consummated the sacrificial system given in the Torah; i.e. the death and resurrection of the Jewish Messiah, Yeshua of Nazareth, who died for the sins of the whole world.

So enter into His presence boldly today with the full knowledge that the veil was torn -- the sacrifice was provided -- and the work was completed 2000 years ago in our Messiah Yeshua!

  • This is Worthy 1

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