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Albert_

Is the bible to be taken literally?

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Hi

should all of the bible be taken literally or should some parts or all of it be viewed as poetry and therefore be interpreted more liberally?

Things like the exodus, genesis and sodom and gemorrah.

Edited by Albert_
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Yes, the bible is to be taken literally.  It does incorporate symbolism to illustrate points and identify people and their purpose, particularly in the area of prophecy.  One such example would be the Lamb of God.

God bless

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All Scripture is truth, good and profitable for edifying, upilfting, chastising, discipline, learning YHVH'S Way to Live in Christ Jesus.

YHVH Breathed all Scripture ,  inspired called and chosen men to have it written,  and

YHVH Guards His Word,  all Scripture, as He Says,  as He Pleases.

And YHVH Reveals Scripture Understanding to little children,  while hiding it from the educated ones, as He is Pleased so to do.

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1 minute ago, wingnut- said:

Yes, the bible is to be taken literally.  It does incorporate symbolism to illustrate points and identify people and their purpose, particularly in the area of prophecy.  One such example would be the Lamb of God.

God bless

I agree. I always felt that the talking serpent in Genesis was a metaphor for an inner evil voice speaking to Eve or deceptive thoughts 

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3 minutes ago, Unwavering Faith said:

I agree. I always felt that the talking serpent in Genesis was a metaphor for an inner evil voice speaking to Eve or deceptive thoughts 

From the Hebrew language explained elsewhere,  the "shining one" did appear to trick Chavah (Eve) then Adam into disobeying.

The same "shining one" is mentioned in various places.  ("appearing as an angel of light") ....

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16 minutes ago, Albert_ said:

Hi

should all of the bible be taken literally or should some parts or all it be viewed as poetry and therefore be interpreted more liberally?

Things like the exodus, genesis and sodom and gemorrah.

I agree with @Wingnut, that the Bible should be taken literally, unless obviously using figurative language.

There are those who spiritualise it, and those who treat it all allegorically, and in doing so have fallen into error, and failed to see the truth contained in the simple text.  All that is required is that we believe what God has recorded by man's hand, by His inspiration.  It needs no interpretation, for it is it's own interpreter.  As you become acquainted with it, the comparison of Scripture with Scripture will make clear the most difficult of passages.  

In 2 Timothy 3:13-17, Paul tells Timothy, that the Scriptures are able to make us wise unto salvation, through faith that is in Christ Jesus: and that all Scripture is given by inspiration of God, and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness.

* God has said it, I believe it -  Praise His Holy Name!

In Christ Jesus, our risen and glorified, Saviour, Lord and Head.  - Christine

 


 

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42 minutes ago, Albert_ said:

Hi

should all of the bible be taken literally or should some parts or all of it be viewed as poetry and therefore be interpreted more liberally?

Things like the exodus, genesis and sodom and gemorrah.

The history is to be taken literally, but there are parts what cannot be taken literally.  One example is when Jesus stated in Matthew 5:29 "If your right eye causes you to sin, pluck it out and cast it from you; for it is more profitable for you that one of your members perish, than for your whole body to be cast into hell.", I do not believe Jesus expected people to start plucking their eyes out if they caught themselves lusting after someone of the opposite sex, or coveting something someone else owns.

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Posted (edited)

The Bible is both written both literally and in highly symbolic meanings. Understanding the Bible, not to be confused with people giving their "interpretation", is only for those who are God's people. Jesus said it succinctly: "I publicly praise you, Father, Lord of heaven and earth, because you have hidden these things (such as the meaning of God's Kingdom, Matt 11:12) from the wise and intellectual ones and have revealed them to young children. Yes, O Father, because this is the way approved by you".(Matt 11:25, 26)


Hence, the Bible was written by God in such a way that only "young children" or those who are genuinely humble, allowing for God's holy spirit to direct their efforts to unlock the "sacred secrets" (or mysteries) of the Bible, can gain it deep meaning. Everyone else is locked out.


At Ezekiel 1, is seen a vision of a celestial chariot whose "rims were so high that they inspired awe and the rims of all four were full of eyes all around", with angelic creatures between each of the wheels and being driven by "the spirit".(Eze 1:18-20) Is it literal or symbolic ?


No such vehicle has ever been seen, and thus is understood as symbolic of our Maker, Jehovah God's directing his people through a group of men called "the faithful and discreet slave" who is responsible for dispensing "food at the proper time" ("meat in due season", KJV) or spiritual food to the "domestics".("household", KJV) during Jesus invisible "presence" that began in 1914 when he was installed as king of God's Kingdom.(Matt 24:3, 45-47; Rev 6:1, 2)


Or at Matthew 13, in speaking about the "sacred secrets" ("mysteries", KJV) of God's Kingdom, Jesus used the Greek word syneimi six times (Matt 13:13, 14, 15, 19, 23, 51), that means "to mentally put the pieces together" ("understand" KJV), like trying to figure out a riddle.


But in so doing, Jesus clearly showed that only his genuine disciples are able to "mentally put the pieces together", discerning what is literal and what is symbolic, explaining "Bible truths", telling them: "To you it is granted to understand the sacred secrets of the Kingdom of the heavens, but to them (those not Jesus genuine disciples) it is not granted".(Matt 13:11)


Of Jesus authentic disciples, he said that "whoever has (a deep understanding of the Bible due to having humility so that God's holy spirit works with them), more will be given him, and he will be made to abound (in greater understanding of the "sacred secrets" of the Bible), but whoever does not have (though feeling that he can "interpret" the Bible), even what he has (or what grasp of the Bible he may feel he has) will be taken from him (being revealed that his understanding of the Bible is "way off course")".(Matt 13:13)


The Bible book of Proverbs states: "It is the glory of God to keep a matter secret, and the glory of kings to search through a matter".(Prov 25:2) This establishes that God keeps secrets from those not qualified, but reveals them to "kings". For example, what is the meaning of the prophecy at Genesis 3:15, whereby it speaks of a "woman" whose offspring crushes the "serpent" in the "head", while the "serpent" strikes the "woman's" offspring in the "heel" ? Is it literal or symbolic ?


Who is the "woman", her "offspring", the "serpent" and his "offspring" ? A clue is that the "woman" reappears at Isaiah 54, 60, 62, 66 and again at Revelation 12. Another clue is to let Scripture interpret Scripture. For example, Isaiah 51:9, speaks of the "arm of Jehovah" to awake so as to take decisive action. Who or what is the "arm of Jehovah" ? A clue is found at Isaiah 53:1, 2.


Or at Isaiah 51:9, who or what is "Rahab" that was broke to pieces by the "arm of Jehovah" ? A clue is found at Isaiah 30:7.

Edited by guestman
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On 2/28/2018 at 2:24 PM, Albert_ said:

Hi

should all of the bible be taken literally or should some parts or all of it be viewed as poetry and therefore be interpreted more liberally?

Things like the exodus, genesis and sodom and gemorrah.

In Bible College they teach about Bible interpretation. First of all you look at the original people that the Bible was written for. Then you look at how the Bible applies to us in our day, age and generation.  The Bible has what they call shadows and types. Today some people use the words similitude and paradigms. This means the Bible has to be exact and precise or what we call literal.  If you go to YouTube there are lectures from Universities like Stanford that teaches the Bible as literature.  My son took his college literature class in high school, so it not that difficult.  Of course Bible colleges takes a different approach to the Bible than the liberal universities. Jonathan Cahn has a book on the best seller list and he shows us how to understand the Bible as a Paradigm.  He also gets into Greek Mythology like Venus and Aphrodite (warrior goddess & warrior princess) and shows us how to accurately handle that.  I went to more classic schools so we were taught how to understand Greek Mythology and I went to the Bible college for a few years.  Then in the state college when you take psychology they teach how to work with archetypes from Greek and Roman Mythology. So the approach is different depending on the school that you are attending. Disney has their own approach also which is popular with the children. 

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Just now, JohnR7 said:

In Bible College they teach about Bible interpretation.

Why don't they all teach what YHVH reveals ?  (i.e. HIS Understanding and Salvation as written in Scripture)

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