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Eyesonly

Seeking the meaning for rev 22:12

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Hello:

What does rev 22:12 mean when Christ says he is going to give to everyone one according to his work. 

12 “And behold, I am coming quickly, and My reward is with Me, to give to every one according to his work. 

Are we not in the age of Grace without  works.

oh wait, does "his work" mean Christ's work? 

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John 6:28-29

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We are in the mystery of the age of grace. I believe it has nothing to do with the Body of Christ. I understand this to be for Israel. We shall be gone gone gone! Praise God and worship only Him!

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On 10/12/2018 at 6:46 PM, Eyesonly said:

Hello:

What does rev 22:12 mean when Christ says he is going to give to everyone one according to his work. 

12 “And behold, I am coming quickly, and My reward is with Me, to give to every one according to his work. 

Are we not in the age of Grace without  works.

oh wait, does "his work" mean Christ's work? 

A better rendering from the Greek:

"When I come, it will be quick, catching people for judgment and reward!"

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1 hour ago, Billiards Ball said:

A better rendering from the Greek:

"When I come, it will be quick, catching people for judgment and reward!"

Please this is what greek study looks like

    

Rev 22:12

 

 

12 

 

 kai\
 CONJ
And,
2532
 kaí

 

 i)dou/,
 V_2AMM_2S
behold,
2400
 idoú,

 

 e&rxomai
 V_PNI_1S
I  come
2064
 érchomai

 

 taxu/
 ADV
quickly;
5035
 tachú

 

 kai\
 CONJ
and
2532
 kaí

 

 o(
 T_NSM
 
3588
 ho

 

 misqo/$
 N__NSM
reward
3408
 misthós

 

 mou
 P_P1GS
my
3450
 mou

 

 met'
 PREP
with
3326
 met'

 

 e)mou=
 P_P1GS
me,
1700
 emoú

 

 a)podou=nai
 V_2AAN
to  give
591
 apodoúnai

 

 e(ka/stw|
 A__DSM
every  man
1538
 hekástœ

 

 w($
 ADV
according  as
5613
 hœs

 

 to\
 T_NSN
 
3588
 tó

 

 e&rgon
 N__NSN
work
2041
 érgon

 


 au)tou=
 P_P-GSM
his
846
 autoú

 

 e)stai
 V_FDI_3S
shall  be.
2071
 estai

 


What Greek work looks like… first you have the Greek word ‘ misqo/$ ’; then you the grammatical construct ‘ N__NSM ‘; then you have word for word translation ‘ misqo/$ =  reward ’;and finally etymology/contextual study ‘3408’     

NT:3408

 

NT:3408 misqo/$ ‎misthos (mis-thos'); apparently a primary word; pay for services (literally or figuratively), good or bad:

KJV - hire, reward, wages.

    

NT:3408

 

3408. misqo/$ misthós; gen. ‎misthoú, masc. noun. Wages, hire, reward.

(I) Particularly and generally (Matt 20:8; Luke 10:7, "worthy is the worker of his hire" [a.t.]; Acts 1:18, "the wages of his crime" [a.t.]; Rom 4:4; 1 Cor 3:8; 1 Tim 5:18; James 5:4; 2 Peter 2:15, "the wages of unrighteousness" [a.t.], hence wages gotten through iniquity; Jude 11, "for hire" or gain; Sept.: Gen 30:28; 31:7; Mal 3:5).

(II) In the sense of reward to be received hereafter (Matt 5:12,46; 6:1,2,5,16; 10:41,42; Mark 9:41; Luke 6:23,35; John 4:36; 1 Cor 3:14; 9:17,18; 2 John 8; Rev 11:18; 22:12; Sept.: Gen 15:1).

(III) In the sense of retribution, punishment (2 Peter 2:13); see ‎misthapodosía (3405), reward, punishment.

Deriv.: ‎antimisthía (489), reward, penalty; ‎misthapodót¢s (3406), rewarder; ‎místhios (3407), a day laborer, one paid by the day; ‎misthóœ (3409), to hire; ‎misthœtós (3411), a hired worker.

 

Syn.: ‎amoib¢¡ (287), recompense; ‎antapódoma (468), recompense, what one receives in reward or punishment; ‎antapódosis (469), the act of recompensing; ‎opsœ¡nion (3800), rations for soldiers, wages.

Ant.: ‎ekdík¢sis (1557), vengeance, punishment, the bringing out of justice, what is due; ‎epitimía (2009), a privation of honor or rights; ‎kólasis (2851), punishment as the negation of the enjoyment of love; ‎dík¢ (1349), the execution of a sentence; ‎timœría (5098), disciplinary punishment, the vindication of honor.

 Complete Word Study Dictionary: New Testament © 1992 by AMG International, Inc. Revised Edition, 1993


    

NT:3408

 

NT:3408 misthós [reward], misthóœ [to hire], místhios [day laborer], misthœtós [hired hand], misthapodótes [rewarder], misthapodosía [reward, retribution], antimisthía [reward, penalty]

A. The Use of the Group.

1. Outside the NT.

(1) The Graeco-Roman World. a. misthós means first "reward for work." b. It then means professional "fee." c. A third sense is soldiers' "pay." d. We then find the meaning "rent." e. Another use is for the "honorarium" of a priest. f. "Payment" for visiting an assembly is another meaning. g. We also find the sense "expenses." h. "Bribe" is sometimes the meaning. i. Human or divine "reward" is another sense, although the Greeks do not normally use the term outside the commercial sphere. j. Divine reward may take the form of "punishment." The verb ‎misthóœ means "to hire or let." The ‎misthœtós is "one who is hired for pay." ‎místhios means "hired" or "hired hand." ‎misthapodót¢s means "one who hires for service."

(2) The LXX. The LXX contains examples of ‎misthós in most of the senses listed above. God rewards the righteous in this life as a sign of his grace and blessing (Gen 15:1; Isa 40:10). "Penal recompense" occurs in Ezek 27:33. ‎misthóœ means a. "to hire for reward" (Judg 9:4), b. "to bribe," and c. "to buy." We find ‎misthœtós for "hired hand" in Ex 12:45 etc., also for "mercenary." ‎místhios means "hired worker" in Lev 19:13 (A).

(3) Philo and Josephus. Philo uses ‎misthós for "payment" and "priestly honorarium." He also has ‎misthœtós for "laborer." Josephus has ‎misthós mostly for ordinary payments, though occasionally for divine rewards based on God's justice.

    

 

2. The NT.

(1) misthós. The NT uses ‎misthós for "pay" in Luke 10:7 and 1 Tim 5:18. The laborer is worth his pay (cf. Matt 10:10). Wages not paid are an accusation against the rich (James 5:4). Wages are paid at the end of the day in Matt 20:8. The "reward of iniquity" is a fixed expression in Acts 1:8 etc. The iniquity is greed for money in 2 Peter 2:15. The false teachers want to profit from their wrongdoing, and judgment will overtake them. The use in John 4:36 is figurative, i.e., the reward of fruit for spiritual labor (cf. 1 Cor 9:18), where Paul finds his reward in making the gospel free to those to whom he brings it. Divine reward is the point in Matt 5:11-12. This does not come through seeking earthly gain or recognition, but through pure, unselfish obedience (Matt 6:2ff.). There is a great reward in heaven only where there is unlimited love (Matt 5:46; Luke 6:35). Paul sees a relation between the reward of service and the inner commitment to it (1 Cor 3:8). This is an eschatological reward, not the reward of outward success. Those whose work endures will be rewarded (1 Cor 3:14). Reward for Paul is not a matter of achievement but of grace (Rom 4:4). 2 John 8 and Rev 11:18 both express expectation of reward. But there may also be reward in the sense of punishment for the wicked (Rev 22:12).

(2) Derivatives. ‎misthóœ occurs twice for "to hire" in Matt 20:1ff. ‎misthœtós means a "hired sailor" in Mark 1:20 and a "hired shepherd" in John 10:12. ‎místhios means "day laborer" in Luke 15:17. ‎misthapodót¢s in Heb 11:6 refers to the God who rewards those who seek him, i.e., who accept his transcendent reality. ‎misthapodosía in Heb 10:35 means "recompense of reward," i.e., the promise of salvation which is given to those who confidently persevere. In Heb 11:6,40 this reward is integrated into the divine purpose. In 11:26, therefore, it is a powerful motive in the moral struggle. Moses can prefer Christ to the treasures of Egypt because he has the promise of eschatological glory. Yet the same word can bear a negative sense in Heb 2:2, where transgression of the law is said to bring a just punishment or "retribution." ‎antimisthía, too, is an ambivalent term. It means "recompense" or "return" in 2 Cor 6:13, where Paul asks his readers to open up their hearts in childlike response to him. In Rom 1:27, however, it is the just "penalty" for unnatural conduct. 2 Clem. 6.13 [ET] uses it in the good sense as the response to Christ or God for his saving work. In 2 Clem. 11.6 [ET] it has the sense of the final reward for righteous acts.

 

B. The Concept of Reward.

1. The Graeco-Roman World.

(1) The Basic View of Greek Ethics. Greek ethics teaches that goodness and happiness coincide. Happiness is the supreme good, and good acts contribute to it. Harmony is of the essence of happiness, and this may be achieved in this life. Just kings enjoy it, the gods promote it, and knowledge leads to it. Evil acts are punished by madness, lightning, sickness, etc. Retribution here and now makes the belief in future reward or punishment unnecessary. True goodness is sought for its own sake.

(2) Absence of the Biblical Concept of Reward. In rejecting the idea of reward, or of doing good for the sake of reward, the teaching of Socrates and Plato differs from that of the OT and NT. Plato may refer to rewards, but only along the lines of the immanent laws of being, and not in the context of motive. Aristotle, too, believes that reason leads the soul to virtue, supported by the indwelling desire for happiness. For Stoicism morality is obedience to deity as cosmic law. Omnipresent deity sees all things, but happiness resides in virtue, and there is neither reward nor punishment beyond virtue or vice. The only reward is to fulfil the goal of this life; there is no other.

(3) The Mysteries. In contrast, the mysteries are oriented to a future life and reward. Eternal salvation is assured by cultic participation. In Orphic circles asceticism is demanded as a test, but a final judgment will decide between heavenly reward and eternal torment.

(4) The Hellenistic Cults. These cults find a considerable place for future rewards. Egypt in particular shows great concern for the after-life. Whether good or evil deeds predominate will decide the soul's destiny. In Mithraism, too, those whose merits outweigh their sins will be conveyed safely to the heavenly spheres of light.

(5) Roman Religion. Roman religion makes much of a contractual relation to the gods in which there are vows and offerings in return for assistance. In sacrifice worshippers remind the deity of then gifts and expect to be heard in return.

(6) Death as Reward. In antiquity supreme recognition by the deity takes the form of being taken up to the deity. Early death may thus be seen as a reward. Death may also entail deification by a mystical vision that comes to a climax in the heavenly journey.

 Dictionary of the New Testament, abridged edition, Copyright © 1985 by William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

    

NT:3408

 

2. The OT Belief in Recompense.

(1) The Origin. The OT belief in recompense is an ancient one that perhaps has its origin in the idea that good actions bring happy results and bad ones unhappy results. The belief in a personal God gives this thought the shape of recompense in the stricter sense. It is God who relates acts to destiny. A just God, he accords to deeds the due rewards or punishments.

(2) The Meaning and Significance. In Judg 9:23-24 the quarrel between Abimelech and the Shechemites is interpreted as divine retribution for the sin against the sons of Jerubbaal. In 1 Sam 15:2-3 the war on Amalek is construed as a divine visitation. In both cases God uses human instruments to serve the purpose of recompense. The concept links and explains historical events. God is at work in these events, and their inner justification thus comes to light. History is not arbitrary. As one may see from Gen 2:4-11:9, human sin is responsible for the pitiable state of humanity, for it comes up against the divine righteousness. The main thought, then, is not so much that God rewards good acts as that he punishes evil ones. God's saving initiative in the call of Abraham goes far beyond the idea of recompense.

(3) The Belief in the Prophets. In the prophets the holy God is against all sin and his annihilating judgment falls upon it. God never overlooks sin, not even in his elect people (Amos 1:3-2:16). The relation between God and Israel is a personal relation in which obedience and disobedience mean decision, and recompense rules out a frivolous view of election. The divine retribution proclaims the reality of God and the unconditional nature of his claim. Acceptance or rejection of this claim signifies decision for the future. Since Israel is a unit, recompense is at first collective, falling on the innocent as well as the guilty and children as well as parents. Yet, if applied too strictly, this principle can inhibit repentance. Hence the prophets proclaim that God, too, will "repent" of his judgments if the people repents (Jer 18:1ff.). Ezekiel carries this thought to the point of an individual retribution that does not permit any blaming of others for one's own fate (Ezek 18:21ff.). Yet this is not a doctrinaire position but an assurance that God is always willing and ready to deliver the penitent from impending disaster.

(4) Twofold Recompense. The thought of reward as well as retribution is strong in Deuteronomy (cf. ch. 28). The stress is now a positive one, i.e., so to live as not merely to escape judgment but to receive blessing. The history of Israel as told in Judges and Chronicles illustrates the principle. Even the wicked Manasseh is allowed a long life in view of his tardy repentance (2 Chron 33).

(5) The Wisdom Literature. The idea of twofold recompense is an important one in Proverbs (cf. 11:21,31; 19:17). Happiness is the goal here, and obeying God is the way to it. Job, however, shows that there is a danger of serving God with the ulterior motive of achieving happiness (Job 1:9). If Ecclesiastes points out that ultimately the good may suffer and the wicked flourish (8:14), Job makes it plain that God himself is not to be bound by the principles of recompense, and Ps 73 totally transcends the principle with its faith that fellowship with God means more than all recompense in either heaven or earth (73:25-26).



3. The Concept of Reward in Later Judaism. Later Judaism adopts the principle of recompense and combines it with eschatological expectation. Eternal life is promised to the righteous as a reward. There are already rewards and penalties in this life, but death also serves to punish the wicked and to atone for the sins of the righteous. Sometimes the idea of recompense is presented in commercial images, but the thought of divine grace and mercy is also present. Reward provides a strong incentive for keeping the law, although some rabbis insist strongly that the law is to be kept for its own sake and not just for the rewards it brings. While salvation will ultimately depend on God's forgiveness, the stress on human achievement introduces a common note of uncertainty and leads in some circles to the legalistic piling up of merits in order to counterbalance offenses.

4. The Concept of Reward in the NT.

(1) The Synoptists.

a. The Synoptic Gospels refer freely to both rewards and punishments. To do God's will is to lay up treasure in heaven (Matt 6:19ff.). Faithful disciples will be rewarded (Matt 5:12). The rich young ruler may find treasure in heaven (Mark 10:21). Rewards are offered for service (Matt 20:2; 24:45ff.; 19:27). Reward is either recompense for achievement (Matt 5:7) or compensation for what is renounced (Matt 10:39). The reward is God's kingdom. Like the punishment that is also threatened (cf. Matt 11:20ff.; 18:23ff.; Mark 12:9), it is future; the lot of disciples in this life is persecution. The one exception is in Mark 10:29-30, where those who give up family for the gospel will find a new family in the community of faith. The community is the sign of the irruption of God's lordship with the coming of Christ and his raising from the dead.

b. Many of the sayings about reward and punishment have obvious parallels in Judaism. Scholars have thus raised the question how far they derive from Jesus himself and how far they may be fashioned or adapted by the community. Mark 10:29-30; 11:25; Matt 13:36ff.; 25:14ff., and Luke 16:19ff. have all been subjected to minute analysis. Yet sayings like Mark 9:43ff.; 3:28-29; 12:1ff., Matt 7:13-14; 10:28; 18:23ff., and Luke 13:1ff. seem to be undeniably authentic.

c. The concept of reward is important for Jesus. Yet God rewards as a father, not as a judge (Matt 6:1ff.; 25:34). He demands obedience, but the reward far exceeds what is deserved, and it is thus a matter of divine generosity rather than human merit. This lifts the concept out of the sphere of calculation. In Matt 20:1ff. the equal treatment of the laborers shows that reward is not according to achievement but according to the prodigality of love. Luke 17:7ff. makes it plain that the concept of merit is totally repudiated. The promise of the kingdom to children in Mark 10:15 strengthens this thought. God alone is good (Mark 10:18), and this means that like children we must simply let the kingdom be granted to us. In Jesus the kingdom has already broken into time and it catches up the disciples in its living power, so that their moral actions are not autonomous achievements that deserve a reward but manifestations of a divine power that moves on to future fulfilment. For Jesus, disciples stand under the eyes of a holy God and owe obedience to him, but salvation is God's own work and in his generosity God grants to receptive hearts a reward which finds in the kingdom its commencement and consummation. The concept of reward is thus taken up into that of the kingdom as the divine glory undeservedly received.

(2) Paul.

a. Paul, too, speaks of twofold recompense (cf. 2 Cor 5:10; Gal 6:7-8; Rom 2:1ff.). He adds promises and threats to his admonitions (cf. Gal 5:21). He compares himself to a runner seeking a prize (1 Cor 9:24ff.). Judgment is according to works (1 Cor 3:13ff.). Paul himself seeks praise from God (1 Cor 9:14-15). At the same time, the day of judgment is for Paula day of victory and joy, for the reward is according to grace (Rom 4:4). The fact that justification is by faith, and that faith itself is God's work, rules out any idea of merit. A new reality has come• with Christ's life, death, and resurrection. The Spirit imparts this reality to believers, so that Christian life and work are no longer a matter of their own volition or achievement but of the Spirit's infilling and impulsion (Rom 8:14; Gal 5:22; Phil 2:13). Thus, if Paul does more than all others, it is not he, but the grace of God that is with him (1 Cor 15:10). There is no place for human boasting (Rom 3:27). God in his grace gives the incomparable reward of his kingdom (1 Cor 15:50), of the glory of Christ (Col 3:4).

b. If a certain tension may thus be seen in Paul, it should be noted that he still speaks of reward and retribution because God is the holy God who demands obedience, because the Spirit manifests himself primarily in the ethical rather than the ecstatic sphere (Gal 5:22), and because justification itself implies the seriousness of divine judgment. For Paul, then, twofold recompense is a safeguard against libertinism, ecstaticism, and moral passivity. Yet within the framework of grace and faith it involves no dependence on merit. It can accompany, then, a joyous assurance of salvation which need not add up achievements but even in the midst of moral struggle knows the grace of God and stands in the living power of his kingdom. Paul often speaks in traditional terms, but he lifts the concept of reward into the pure air of grace and faith, of the Spirit and joy, where no place remains for externalism or legalism.

c. Ephesians is wholly Pauline in its thinking about reward. The life of believers is grounded in God's saving work (2:5). Only as children of light can they do the works that God expects of them (2:8-9). Only in Christ is there power for truth and love (4:13). The divine election rules out all idea of claim or merit (1:4). Assurance of the inheritance rests on the indwelling of the Spirit (1:13-14). It is in this context that the admonition of 6:8 contains the thought of a divine recompense.

d. The Pastorals. These epistles, too, emphasize that God did not send the Savior because of works (Titus 3:5; 2 Tim 1:9). Yet the reverse of works is now God's pity rather than faith (Titus 3:5). Practical moral concerns, then, are more prominent. God judges on the basis of works (1 Tim 5:24-25) and there is a reward both in this world (1 Tim 4:8) and the next (4:16). Yet works are possible only on the basis of the relation to Christ (1 Tim 2:15).

(3) The Johannine Writings.

a. An echo of the idea of recompense may be caught in John 9:31, but in general all thought of reward is transcended, for the resurrection corresponds to the life that is already present (6:39-40), eternal life fulfils the new birth from above (3:3,6), all that disciples achieve derives from grace (1:12,16), and sin and death are overcome by the gift of divine life (1 John 3:9-10; John 5:24ff.).

b. In Revelation judgment is the eschatological expression of the divine majesty. Sinners receive punishment on earth (2:22-23), but supremely at the judgment (11:18 etc.), when the righteous will receive the full blessings of the kingdom (2:7; 7:15-16; 11:12, etc.). Judgment is by works (20:12-13), and good works follow those who die in the Lord (14:13; cf. 7:9ff.; 14:4; 2:19). Yet Revelation is not legalistic, for the names of believers are in the book of life from all eternity (17:8), and already on earth they are kings and priests (1:6) and witnesses. Works, then, are an outworking of redemption and the reward is a public declaration of what they are. Being sealed, they do not fear the judgment but await the manifestation of the glory of God and their hidden kingship.

(4) Post-Pauline Writings.

a. Acts. Acts speaks of the reward of the Spirit for obedience (1:5; 2:1ff.). The presence of the same Spirit brings punishment even on earth to those who set themselves in deceitful and selfish opposition (5:4-5,9-10; 8:20ff.). Judgment is proclaimed (10:42; 17:31; 24:15), but the Christian life rests on Christ's life, death, and resurrection, and on the ministry of the Spirit, so that grace replaces merit. The inheritance of Acts 24:32 is God's gift rather than an earned payment (cf. the role of forgiveness and faith in 26:18).

b. Hebrews. As Hebrews warns its readers against relapse, the idea of recompense takes on great importance. There is punishment for apostasy, but rest is the reward of faithfulness (4:3), along with salvation (9:28) and the kingdom (12:28). Faith insures a part in the consummation. As faithfulness, it is rewarded; as hope it becomes fulfilment. Yet faith has already experienced the future reality (6:19). Christians live by the Spirit of grace (10:29) and bear the powers of the new aeon (6:5). For them the last judgment is grace (4:16), so that they move toward it with confident joy (10:19ff.). They do not have to rely on meritorious achievement but rest on grace (4:16).

c. James. Christians are regenerated by the word of truth (1:18). It is faith that expresses itself in works (2:14ff.), leads to prayer (1:6), and is confirmed in affliction (1:2). Suffering, not reward, comes in this life, and although faith is futile without works, there is no place for merit, since faith is God's gift (2:5), election is the basis of the reward (2:5), and salvation rests on the implanted word (1:21) and the indwelling Spirit (4:5).

d. 1 Peter. This work, designed to strengthen believers in face of persecution, refers to the future inheritance as a recompense (5:6) and issues a plain reminder of the judgment. Yet again the basis of the Christian life is faith in Christ (1:3), Christians are regenerate (2:2) and set in the reality of the resurrection (1:3-4), and their salvation (1:9) or glorification (1:11) is the consummation of their calling rather than a merited payment.

e. Jude and 2 Peter. In their warnings against heretics, these epistles stress divine judgment (Jude 4,6-7; 2 Peter 2:3,9) and expectation of the kingdom (2 Peter 3:13). Here too, however, divine power is the basis of godliness (2 Peter 1:3-4), and as partakers of the divine nature (1:4) believers may be at peace (3:14). In faith, prayer, and the love of God they look forward to being presented faultless before the presence of God's glory with rejoicing (Jude 20ff.).

(5) The Meaning of Reward for Jesus and Primitive Christianity. The NT speaks freely of reward but transcends the concept. Strict recompense would mean judgment for all of us. Reward, then, is a term for God's gracious generosity. It reminds us that we are set before God and it gives us an awareness of the gift of the kingdom. It implies, however, the indwelling of the Spirit, so that calculation is ruled out, and the reality of faith and the Spirit is the true incentive to moral action. Reward is the loving gift of the Father toward which believers may move with confident and childlike trust in the love that will perfect their calling in the glory of the kingdom.

 Dictionary of the New Testament, abridged edition, Copyright © 1985 by William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company. All rights reserved._


So Please when you say the Greek should be understood as this at least do the study in obedience to God

2 Tim 2:15

15 Study to shew thyself approved unto God, a workman that needeth not to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth.

KJV

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9 minutes ago, enoob57 said:

Please this is what greek study looks like

    

 

Rev 22:12

 

 

 

 

 

12 

 

 

 

 kai\
 CONJ
And,
2532
 kaí
 

 

 

 

 i)dou/,
 V_2AMM_2S
behold,
2400
 idoú,
 

 

 

 

 e&rxomai
 V_PNI_1S
I  come
2064
 érchomai
 

 

 

 

 taxu/
 ADV
quickly;
5035
 tachú
 

 

 

 

 kai\
 CONJ
and
2532
 kaí
 

 

 

 

 o(
 T_NSM
 
3588
 ho
 

 

 

 

 misqo/$
 N__NSM
reward
3408
 misthós
 

 

 

 

 mou
 P_P1GS
my
3450
 mou
 

 

 

 

 met'
 PREP
with
3326
 met'
 

 

 

 

 e)mou=
 P_P1GS
me,
1700
 emoú
 

 

 

 

 a)podou=nai
 V_2AAN
to  give
591
 apodoúnai
 

 

 

 

 e(ka/stw|
 A__DSM
every  man
1538
 hekástœ
 

 

 

 

 w($
 ADV
according  as
5613
 hœs
 

 

 

 

 to\
 T_NSN
 
3588
 tó
 

 

 

 

 e&rgon
 N__NSN
work
2041
 érgon
 

 

 

 


 au)tou=
 P_P-GSM
his
846
 autoú
 

 

 

 

 e)stai
 V_FDI_3S
shall  be.
2071
 estai
 

 

 

 


What Greek work looks like… first you have the Greek word ‘ misqo/$ ’; then you the grammatical construct ‘ N__NSM ‘; then you have word for word translation ‘ misqo/$ =  reward ’;and finally etymology/contextual study ‘3408’     

 

NT:3408

 

 

 

NT:3408 misqo/$ ‎misthos (mis-thos'); apparently a primary word; pay for services (literally or figuratively), good or bad:
 

 

KJV - hire, reward, wages.

    

 

NT:3408

 

 

 

3408. misqo/$ misthós; gen. ‎misthoú, masc. noun. Wages, hire, reward.

 

(I) Particularly and generally (Matt 20:8; Luke 10:7, "worthy is the worker of his hire" [a.t.]; Acts 1:18, "the wages of his crime" [a.t.]; Rom 4:4; 1 Cor 3:8; 1 Tim 5:18; James 5:4; 2 Peter 2:15, "the wages of unrighteousness" [a.t.], hence wages gotten through iniquity; Jude 11, "for hire" or gain; Sept.: Gen 30:28; 31:7; Mal 3:5).

 

(II) In the sense of reward to be received hereafter (Matt 5:12,46; 6:1,2,5,16; 10:41,42; Mark 9:41; Luke 6:23,35; John 4:36; 1 Cor 3:14; 9:17,18; 2 John 8; Rev 11:18; 22:12; Sept.: Gen 15:1).

 

(III) In the sense of retribution, punishment (2 Peter 2:13); see ‎misthapodosía (3405), reward, punishment.

 

Deriv.: ‎antimisthía (489), reward, penalty; ‎misthapodót¢s (3406), rewarder; ‎místhios (3407), a day laborer, one paid by the day; ‎misthóœ (3409), to hire; ‎misthœtós (3411), a hired worker.

 

 

 

Syn.: ‎amoib¢¡ (287), recompense; ‎antapódoma (468), recompense, what one receives in reward or punishment; ‎antapódosis (469), the act of recompensing; ‎opsœ¡nion (3800), rations for soldiers, wages.

 

Ant.: ‎ekdík¢sis (1557), vengeance, punishment, the bringing out of justice, what is due; ‎epitimía (2009), a privation of honor or rights; ‎kólasis (2851), punishment as the negation of the enjoyment of love; ‎dík¢ (1349), the execution of a sentence; ‎timœría (5098), disciplinary punishment, the vindication of honor.

 

 Complete Word Study Dictionary: New Testament © 1992 by AMG International, Inc. Revised Edition, 1993

 

 

    

 

NT:3408

 

 

 

NT:3408 misthós [reward], misthóœ [to hire], místhios [day laborer], misthœtós [hired hand], misthapodótes [rewarder], misthapodosía [reward, retribution], antimisthía [reward, penalty]

 

A. The Use of the Group.

 

1. Outside the NT.

 

(1) The Graeco-Roman World. a. misthós means first "reward for work." b. It then means professional "fee." c. A third sense is soldiers' "pay." d. We then find the meaning "rent." e. Another use is for the "honorarium" of a priest. f. "Payment" for visiting an assembly is another meaning. g. We also find the sense "expenses." h. "Bribe" is sometimes the meaning. i. Human or divine "reward" is another sense, although the Greeks do not normally use the term outside the commercial sphere. j. Divine reward may take the form of "punishment." The verb ‎misthóœ means "to hire or let." The ‎misthœtós is "one who is hired for pay." ‎místhios means "hired" or "hired hand." ‎misthapodót¢s means "one who hires for service."

 

(2) The LXX. The LXX contains examples of ‎misthós in most of the senses listed above. God rewards the righteous in this life as a sign of his grace and blessing (Gen 15:1; Isa 40:10). "Penal recompense" occurs in Ezek 27:33. ‎misthóœ means a. "to hire for reward" (Judg 9:4), b. "to bribe," and c. "to buy." We find ‎misthœtós for "hired hand" in Ex 12:45 etc., also for "mercenary." ‎místhios means "hired worker" in Lev 19:13 (A).

 

(3) Philo and Josephus. Philo uses ‎misthós for "payment" and "priestly honorarium." He also has ‎misthœtós for "laborer." Josephus has ‎misthós mostly for ordinary payments, though occasionally for divine rewards based on God's justice.

 

    

 

 

 

2. The NT.

 

(1) misthós. The NT uses ‎misthós for "pay" in Luke 10:7 and 1 Tim 5:18. The laborer is worth his pay (cf. Matt 10:10). Wages not paid are an accusation against the rich (James 5:4). Wages are paid at the end of the day in Matt 20:8. The "reward of iniquity" is a fixed expression in Acts 1:8 etc. The iniquity is greed for money in 2 Peter 2:15. The false teachers want to profit from their wrongdoing, and judgment will overtake them. The use in John 4:36 is figurative, i.e., the reward of fruit for spiritual labor (cf. 1 Cor 9:18), where Paul finds his reward in making the gospel free to those to whom he brings it. Divine reward is the point in Matt 5:11-12. This does not come through seeking earthly gain or recognition, but through pure, unselfish obedience (Matt 6:2ff.). There is a great reward in heaven only where there is unlimited love (Matt 5:46; Luke 6:35). Paul sees a relation between the reward of service and the inner commitment to it (1 Cor 3:8). This is an eschatological reward, not the reward of outward success. Those whose work endures will be rewarded (1 Cor 3:14). Reward for Paul is not a matter of achievement but of grace (Rom 4:4). 2 John 8 and Rev 11:18 both express expectation of reward. But there may also be reward in the sense of punishment for the wicked (Rev 22:12).

 

(2) Derivatives. ‎misthóœ occurs twice for "to hire" in Matt 20:1ff. ‎misthœtós means a "hired sailor" in Mark 1:20 and a "hired shepherd" in John 10:12. ‎místhios means "day laborer" in Luke 15:17. ‎misthapodót¢s in Heb 11:6 refers to the God who rewards those who seek him, i.e., who accept his transcendent reality. ‎misthapodosía in Heb 10:35 means "recompense of reward," i.e., the promise of salvation which is given to those who confidently persevere. In Heb 11:6,40 this reward is integrated into the divine purpose. In 11:26, therefore, it is a powerful motive in the moral struggle. Moses can prefer Christ to the treasures of Egypt because he has the promise of eschatological glory. Yet the same word can bear a negative sense in Heb 2:2, where transgression of the law is said to bring a just punishment or "retribution." ‎antimisthía, too, is an ambivalent term. It means "recompense" or "return" in 2 Cor 6:13, where Paul asks his readers to open up their hearts in childlike response to him. In Rom 1:27, however, it is the just "penalty" for unnatural conduct. 2 Clem. 6.13 [ET] uses it in the good sense as the response to Christ or God for his saving work. In 2 Clem. 11.6 [ET] it has the sense of the final reward for righteous acts.

 

 

 

B. The Concept of Reward.

 

1. The Graeco-Roman World.

 

(1) The Basic View of Greek Ethics. Greek ethics teaches that goodness and happiness coincide. Happiness is the supreme good, and good acts contribute to it. Harmony is of the essence of happiness, and this may be achieved in this life. Just kings enjoy it, the gods promote it, and knowledge leads to it. Evil acts are punished by madness, lightning, sickness, etc. Retribution here and now makes the belief in future reward or punishment unnecessary. True goodness is sought for its own sake.

 

(2) Absence of the Biblical Concept of Reward. In rejecting the idea of reward, or of doing good for the sake of reward, the teaching of Socrates and Plato differs from that of the OT and NT. Plato may refer to rewards, but only along the lines of the immanent laws of being, and not in the context of motive. Aristotle, too, believes that reason leads the soul to virtue, supported by the indwelling desire for happiness. For Stoicism morality is obedience to deity as cosmic law. Omnipresent deity sees all things, but happiness resides in virtue, and there is neither reward nor punishment beyond virtue or vice. The only reward is to fulfil the goal of this life; there is no other.

 

(3) The Mysteries. In contrast, the mysteries are oriented to a future life and reward. Eternal salvation is assured by cultic participation. In Orphic circles asceticism is demanded as a test, but a final judgment will decide between heavenly reward and eternal torment.

 

(4) The Hellenistic Cults. These cults find a considerable place for future rewards. Egypt in particular shows great concern for the after-life. Whether good or evil deeds predominate will decide the soul's destiny. In Mithraism, too, those whose merits outweigh their sins will be conveyed safely to the heavenly spheres of light.

 

(5) Roman Religion. Roman religion makes much of a contractual relation to the gods in which there are vows and offerings in return for assistance. In sacrifice worshippers remind the deity of then gifts and expect to be heard in return.

 

(6) Death as Reward. In antiquity supreme recognition by the deity takes the form of being taken up to the deity. Early death may thus be seen as a reward. Death may also entail deification by a mystical vision that comes to a climax in the heavenly journey.

 

 Dictionary of the New Testament, abridged edition, Copyright © 1985 by William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

 

    

 

NT:3408

 

 

 

2. The OT Belief in Recompense.

 

(1) The Origin. The OT belief in recompense is an ancient one that perhaps has its origin in the idea that good actions bring happy results and bad ones unhappy results. The belief in a personal God gives this thought the shape of recompense in the stricter sense. It is God who relates acts to destiny. A just God, he accords to deeds the due rewards or punishments.

 

(2) The Meaning and Significance. In Judg 9:23-24 the quarrel between Abimelech and the Shechemites is interpreted as divine retribution for the sin against the sons of Jerubbaal. In 1 Sam 15:2-3 the war on Amalek is construed as a divine visitation. In both cases God uses human instruments to serve the purpose of recompense. The concept links and explains historical events. God is at work in these events, and their inner justification thus comes to light. History is not arbitrary. As one may see from Gen 2:4-11:9, human sin is responsible for the pitiable state of humanity, for it comes up against the divine righteousness. The main thought, then, is not so much that God rewards good acts as that he punishes evil ones. God's saving initiative in the call of Abraham goes far beyond the idea of recompense.

 

(3) The Belief in the Prophets. In the prophets the holy God is against all sin and his annihilating judgment falls upon it. God never overlooks sin, not even in his elect people (Amos 1:3-2:16). The relation between God and Israel is a personal relation in which obedience and disobedience mean decision, and recompense rules out a frivolous view of election. The divine retribution proclaims the reality of God and the unconditional nature of his claim. Acceptance or rejection of this claim signifies decision for the future. Since Israel is a unit, recompense is at first collective, falling on the innocent as well as the guilty and children as well as parents. Yet, if applied too strictly, this principle can inhibit repentance. Hence the prophets proclaim that God, too, will "repent" of his judgments if the people repents (Jer 18:1ff.). Ezekiel carries this thought to the point of an individual retribution that does not permit any blaming of others for one's own fate (Ezek 18:21ff.). Yet this is not a doctrinaire position but an assurance that God is always willing and ready to deliver the penitent from impending disaster.

 

(4) Twofold Recompense. The thought of reward as well as retribution is strong in Deuteronomy (cf. ch. 28). The stress is now a positive one, i.e., so to live as not merely to escape judgment but to receive blessing. The history of Israel as told in Judges and Chronicles illustrates the principle. Even the wicked Manasseh is allowed a long life in view of his tardy repentance (2 Chron 33).

 

(5) The Wisdom Literature. The idea of twofold recompense is an important one in Proverbs (cf. 11:21,31; 19:17). Happiness is the goal here, and obeying God is the way to it. Job, however, shows that there is a danger of serving God with the ulterior motive of achieving happiness (Job 1:9). If Ecclesiastes points out that ultimately the good may suffer and the wicked flourish (8:14), Job makes it plain that God himself is not to be bound by the principles of recompense, and Ps 73 totally transcends the principle with its faith that fellowship with God means more than all recompense in either heaven or earth (73:25-26).

 


 

 

3. The Concept of Reward in Later Judaism. Later Judaism adopts the principle of recompense and combines it with eschatological expectation. Eternal life is promised to the righteous as a reward. There are already rewards and penalties in this life, but death also serves to punish the wicked and to atone for the sins of the righteous. Sometimes the idea of recompense is presented in commercial images, but the thought of divine grace and mercy is also present. Reward provides a strong incentive for keeping the law, although some rabbis insist strongly that the law is to be kept for its own sake and not just for the rewards it brings. While salvation will ultimately depend on God's forgiveness, the stress on human achievement introduces a common note of uncertainty and leads in some circles to the legalistic piling up of merits in order to counterbalance offenses.

 

4. The Concept of Reward in the NT.

 

(1) The Synoptists.

 

a. The Synoptic Gospels refer freely to both rewards and punishments. To do God's will is to lay up treasure in heaven (Matt 6:19ff.). Faithful disciples will be rewarded (Matt 5:12). The rich young ruler may find treasure in heaven (Mark 10:21). Rewards are offered for service (Matt 20:2; 24:45ff.; 19:27). Reward is either recompense for achievement (Matt 5:7) or compensation for what is renounced (Matt 10:39). The reward is God's kingdom. Like the punishment that is also threatened (cf. Matt 11:20ff.; 18:23ff.; Mark 12:9), it is future; the lot of disciples in this life is persecution. The one exception is in Mark 10:29-30, where those who give up family for the gospel will find a new family in the community of faith. The community is the sign of the irruption of God's lordship with the coming of Christ and his raising from the dead.

 

b. Many of the sayings about reward and punishment have obvious parallels in Judaism. Scholars have thus raised the question how far they derive from Jesus himself and how far they may be fashioned or adapted by the community. Mark 10:29-30; 11:25; Matt 13:36ff.; 25:14ff., and Luke 16:19ff. have all been subjected to minute analysis. Yet sayings like Mark 9:43ff.; 3:28-29; 12:1ff., Matt 7:13-14; 10:28; 18:23ff., and Luke 13:1ff. seem to be undeniably authentic.

 

c. The concept of reward is important for Jesus. Yet God rewards as a father, not as a judge (Matt 6:1ff.; 25:34). He demands obedience, but the reward far exceeds what is deserved, and it is thus a matter of divine generosity rather than human merit. This lifts the concept out of the sphere of calculation. In Matt 20:1ff. the equal treatment of the laborers shows that reward is not according to achievement but according to the prodigality of love. Luke 17:7ff. makes it plain that the concept of merit is totally repudiated. The promise of the kingdom to children in Mark 10:15 strengthens this thought. God alone is good (Mark 10:18), and this means that like children we must simply let the kingdom be granted to us. In Jesus the kingdom has already broken into time and it catches up the disciples in its living power, so that their moral actions are not autonomous achievements that deserve a reward but manifestations of a divine power that moves on to future fulfilment. For Jesus, disciples stand under the eyes of a holy God and owe obedience to him, but salvation is God's own work and in his generosity God grants to receptive hearts a reward which finds in the kingdom its commencement and consummation. The concept of reward is thus taken up into that of the kingdom as the divine glory undeservedly received.

 

(2) Paul.

 

a. Paul, too, speaks of twofold recompense (cf. 2 Cor 5:10; Gal 6:7-8; Rom 2:1ff.). He adds promises and threats to his admonitions (cf. Gal 5:21). He compares himself to a runner seeking a prize (1 Cor 9:24ff.). Judgment is according to works (1 Cor 3:13ff.). Paul himself seeks praise from God (1 Cor 9:14-15). At the same time, the day of judgment is for Paula day of victory and joy, for the reward is according to grace (Rom 4:4). The fact that justification is by faith, and that faith itself is God's work, rules out any idea of merit. A new reality has come• with Christ's life, death, and resurrection. The Spirit imparts this reality to believers, so that Christian life and work are no longer a matter of their own volition or achievement but of the Spirit's infilling and impulsion (Rom 8:14; Gal 5:22; Phil 2:13). Thus, if Paul does more than all others, it is not he, but the grace of God that is with him (1 Cor 15:10). There is no place for human boasting (Rom 3:27). God in his grace gives the incomparable reward of his kingdom (1 Cor 15:50), of the glory of Christ (Col 3:4).

 

b. If a certain tension may thus be seen in Paul, it should be noted that he still speaks of reward and retribution because God is the holy God who demands obedience, because the Spirit manifests himself primarily in the ethical rather than the ecstatic sphere (Gal 5:22), and because justification itself implies the seriousness of divine judgment. For Paul, then, twofold recompense is a safeguard against libertinism, ecstaticism, and moral passivity. Yet within the framework of grace and faith it involves no dependence on merit. It can accompany, then, a joyous assurance of salvation which need not add up achievements but even in the midst of moral struggle knows the grace of God and stands in the living power of his kingdom. Paul often speaks in traditional terms, but he lifts the concept of reward into the pure air of grace and faith, of the Spirit and joy, where no place remains for externalism or legalism.

 

c. Ephesians is wholly Pauline in its thinking about reward. The life of believers is grounded in God's saving work (2:5). Only as children of light can they do the works that God expects of them (2:8-9). Only in Christ is there power for truth and love (4:13). The divine election rules out all idea of claim or merit (1:4). Assurance of the inheritance rests on the indwelling of the Spirit (1:13-14). It is in this context that the admonition of 6:8 contains the thought of a divine recompense.

 

d. The Pastorals. These epistles, too, emphasize that God did not send the Savior because of works (Titus 3:5; 2 Tim 1:9). Yet the reverse of works is now God's pity rather than faith (Titus 3:5). Practical moral concerns, then, are more prominent. God judges on the basis of works (1 Tim 5:24-25) and there is a reward both in this world (1 Tim 4:8) and the next (4:16). Yet works are possible only on the basis of the relation to Christ (1 Tim 2:15).

 

(3) The Johannine Writings.

 

a. An echo of the idea of recompense may be caught in John 9:31, but in general all thought of reward is transcended, for the resurrection corresponds to the life that is already present (6:39-40), eternal life fulfils the new birth from above (3:3,6), all that disciples achieve derives from grace (1:12,16), and sin and death are overcome by the gift of divine life (1 John 3:9-10; John 5:24ff.).

 

b. In Revelation judgment is the eschatological expression of the divine majesty. Sinners receive punishment on earth (2:22-23), but supremely at the judgment (11:18 etc.), when the righteous will receive the full blessings of the kingdom (2:7; 7:15-16; 11:12, etc.). Judgment is by works (20:12-13), and good works follow those who die in the Lord (14:13; cf. 7:9ff.; 14:4; 2:19). Yet Revelation is not legalistic, for the names of believers are in the book of life from all eternity (17:8), and already on earth they are kings and priests (1:6) and witnesses. Works, then, are an outworking of redemption and the reward is a public declaration of what they are. Being sealed, they do not fear the judgment but await the manifestation of the glory of God and their hidden kingship.

 

(4) Post-Pauline Writings.

 

a. Acts. Acts speaks of the reward of the Spirit for obedience (1:5; 2:1ff.). The presence of the same Spirit brings punishment even on earth to those who set themselves in deceitful and selfish opposition (5:4-5,9-10; 8:20ff.). Judgment is proclaimed (10:42; 17:31; 24:15), but the Christian life rests on Christ's life, death, and resurrection, and on the ministry of the Spirit, so that grace replaces merit. The inheritance of Acts 24:32 is God's gift rather than an earned payment (cf. the role of forgiveness and faith in 26:18).

 

b. Hebrews. As Hebrews warns its readers against relapse, the idea of recompense takes on great importance. There is punishment for apostasy, but rest is the reward of faithfulness (4:3), along with salvation (9:28) and the kingdom (12:28). Faith insures a part in the consummation. As faithfulness, it is rewarded; as hope it becomes fulfilment. Yet faith has already experienced the future reality (6:19). Christians live by the Spirit of grace (10:29) and bear the powers of the new aeon (6:5). For them the last judgment is grace (4:16), so that they move toward it with confident joy (10:19ff.). They do not have to rely on meritorious achievement but rest on grace (4:16).

 

c. James. Christians are regenerated by the word of truth (1:18). It is faith that expresses itself in works (2:14ff.), leads to prayer (1:6), and is confirmed in affliction (1:2). Suffering, not reward, comes in this life, and although faith is futile without works, there is no place for merit, since faith is God's gift (2:5), election is the basis of the reward (2:5), and salvation rests on the implanted word (1:21) and the indwelling Spirit (4:5).

 

d. 1 Peter. This work, designed to strengthen believers in face of persecution, refers to the future inheritance as a recompense (5:6) and issues a plain reminder of the judgment. Yet again the basis of the Christian life is faith in Christ (1:3), Christians are regenerate (2:2) and set in the reality of the resurrection (1:3-4), and their salvation (1:9) or glorification (1:11) is the consummation of their calling rather than a merited payment.

 

e. Jude and 2 Peter. In their warnings against heretics, these epistles stress divine judgment (Jude 4,6-7; 2 Peter 2:3,9) and expectation of the kingdom (2 Peter 3:13). Here too, however, divine power is the basis of godliness (2 Peter 1:3-4), and as partakers of the divine nature (1:4) believers may be at peace (3:14). In faith, prayer, and the love of God they look forward to being presented faultless before the presence of God's glory with rejoicing (Jude 20ff.).

 

(5) The Meaning of Reward for Jesus and Primitive Christianity. The NT speaks freely of reward but transcends the concept. Strict recompense would mean judgment for all of us. Reward, then, is a term for God's gracious generosity. It reminds us that we are set before God and it gives us an awareness of the gift of the kingdom. It implies, however, the indwelling of the Spirit, so that calculation is ruled out, and the reality of faith and the Spirit is the true incentive to moral action. Reward is the loving gift of the Father toward which believers may move with confident and childlike trust in the love that will perfect their calling in the glory of the kingdom.

 

 Dictionary of the New Testament, abridged edition, Copyright © 1985 by William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company. All rights reserved._


So Please when you say the Greek should be understood as this at least do the study in obedience to God

2 Tim 2:15

 

15 Study to shew thyself approved unto God, a workman that needeth not to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth.

 

KJV

 

Thank you, sincerely. What is your rendering of the verse in question? I've heard numerous scholars say "it refers to the events of Revelation being compressed in time," that is, the 10-day judgment in Heaven, the 7-year Tribulation, etc. being relatively small scales of time compared to all else that comes before in Earth history.

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@Billiards Ball
The flow of the context is God completing His telling to us through to the eternal state through His servant John...  outlined in chapter 1

Rev 1:7

19 Write the things which thou hast seen, and the things which are, and the things which shall be hereafter;
KJV


Then here He has finished the outline unto 'The Eternal State' Rev 1:7c things which shall be hereafter;

Rev 22:1-6

22 And he shewed me a pure river of water of life, clear as crystal, proceeding out of the throne of God and of the Lamb.

2 In the midst of the street of it, and on either side of the river, was there the tree of life, which bare twelve manner of fruits, and yielded her fruit every month: and the leaves of the tree were for the healing of the nations.

3 And there shall be no more curse: but the throne of God and of the Lamb shall be in it; and his servants shall serve him:

4 And they shall see his face; and his name shall be in their foreheads.

5 And there shall be no night there; and they need no candle, neither light of the sun; for the Lord God giveth them light: and they shall reign for ever and ever.

6 And he said unto me, These sayings are faithful and true: and the Lord God of the holy prophets sent his angel to shew unto his servants the things which must shortly be done.
KJV


where our context returns to where (time period) John is writing this

Rev 22:7-21

7 Behold, I come quickly: blessed is he that keepeth the sayings of the prophecy of this book.

8 And I John saw these things, and heard them. And when I had heard and seen, I fell down to worship before the feet of the angel which shewed me these things.

9 Then saith he unto me, See thou do it not: for I am thy fellowservant, and of thy brethren the prophets, and of them which keep the sayings of this book: worship God.

10 And he saith unto me, Seal not the sayings of the prophecy of this book: for the time is at hand.

11 He that is unjust, let him be unjust still: and he which is filthy, let him be filthy still: and he that is righteous, let him be righteous still: and he that is holy, let him be holy still.

12 And, behold, I come quickly; and my reward is with me, to give every man according as his work shall be.

13 I am Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the end, the first and the last.

14 Blessed are they that do his commandments, that they may have right to the tree of life, and may enter in through the gates into the city.

15 For without are dogs, and sorcerers, and whoremongers, and murderers, and idolaters, and whosoever loveth and maketh a lie.

16 I Jesus have sent mine angel to testify unto you these things in the churches. I am the root and the offspring of David, and the bright and morning star.

17 And the Spirit and the bride say, Come. And let him that heareth say, Come. And let him that is athirst come. And whosoever will, let him take the water of life freely.

18 For I testify unto every man that heareth the words of the prophecy of this book, If any man shall add unto these things, God shall add unto him the plagues that are written in this book:

19 And if any man shall take away from the words of the book of this prophecy, God shall take away his part out of the book of life, and out of the holy city, and from the things which are written in this book.

20 He which testifieth these things saith, Surely I come quickly. Amen. Even so, come, Lord Jesus.

21 The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ be with you all. Amen.
KJV


It is the capstone from which God's Revelation of all things have been told going back to the time of writing (John's day) the context begins letting all who come after this time to know the two judgments: One for Christian's what has been done in the body (judgment seat of Christ); the second judgment for those who reject the idea of God or submission thereof (great white throne). As we the flower of grass one of these two judgments comes quickly to all...

Edited by enoob57

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On ‎10‎/‎12‎/‎2018 at 6:46 PM, Eyesonly said:

Hello:

What does rev 22:12 mean when Christ says he is going to give to everyone one according to his work. 

12 “And behold, I am coming quickly, and My reward is with Me, to give to every one according to his work. 

Are we not in the age of Grace without  works.

oh wait, does "his work" mean Christ's work? 

I say this in very simple terms as I read it. Behold I come quickly.

Means we must live ready for his coming.

and My reward is with Me, to give to every one according to his work. This refers to the judgment seat of Christ where we as believers shall be judge of our works and rewarded accordingly .

We must diligent to do the works we are called to do. Age of grace does we sit on our hands. This does not mean losing ones salvation 

 

Edited by Mike Mclees
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25 minutes ago, Mike Mclees said:

I say this in very simple terms as I read it. Behold I come quickly.

Means we must live ready for his coming.

and My reward is with Me, to give to every one according to his work. This refers to the judgment seat of Christ where we as believers shall be judge of our works and rewarded accordingly .

We must diligent to do the works we are called to do. Age of grace does we sit on our hands.

 

Amen Bro! Easy to understand and straight to the point.

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