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johnthebaptist

Scary Thoughts

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8 minutes ago, pinacled said:

Again, circumstances of war do not constitute a false allegation of murder.

I hope you realize the consequence of slandering a servant of the Lord. 

Talk about scary.

 

I specifically state that those actions were not a consequence of war.

I was not slandering David and David is no different than you and me.  He was a sinner - a vile one like the rest of us and God called him.  David repented of his sins which were many and chose God.

That is not slander.

Why do you deny that facts of the Bible?  David was a murderer and turned his back on that behavior and chose God and righteousness.

What I said is not scary at all.

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45 minutes ago, Jayne said:

I specifically state that those actions were not a consequence of war.

I was not slandering David and David is no different than you and me.  He was a sinner - a vile one like the rest of us and God called him.  David repented of his sins which were many and chose God.

That is not slander.

Why do you deny that facts of the Bible?  David was a murderer and turned his back on that behavior and chose God and righteousness.

What I said is not scary at all.

An example in comparison today would be accusing a military veteran of murder. 

You only cited from 1 shmuel. And left out an entire spectrum of the accounts of war found in the Tanakh.

Have you forgotten the promise of a time when people would learn war no more.

In my opinion, your assessment with false allegations are irresponsible. And scary.

Edited by pinacled

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On 4/13/2019 at 9:24 PM, johnthebaptist said:

When we repent of our sin, the Lord forgives us. We might still have scary thoughts, but when we think about it, the scary thoughts have no basis in reality, do they?

Excellent topic with a well knit net.

While walking in prayer with a strength of forgiveness Remember always to inspect the fish. Being that murder is the unforgivable, measure the catch.

Though tradition teaches what is kosher for men. It doesn't mean the entire is of no value. Hence the term net and gross value. Take for example a catch is measured as ten and one tenth is inedible. 

Would a person take the choice portion and feed their livestock? No, the choice portion like the Shabbat is made for man. The livestock such as dogs, pets, and a myriad of other animals are given fed in due courses.

For example, If I have a wife, three children, two dogs, and two birds. Would I ever way the value of my families life above the animals? Would I feed my wife and children scraps while giving the dogs the meat. No, nor would I feed the birds at the bread while leaving the children to grind their teeth on grain.

A princilpe of Torah written on the Heart should be apparent to all. But no, there are those that despise feeding the good.

Instead they offer out of the evilness a well of death, scorn, and hate for those who exhibit Love for the Most High.

Blessings Always

Edited by pinacled
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7 hours ago, johnthebaptist said:

Yes, the Lord provides. Faith is an important element. It's easier to have faith when we are obedient to the Lord's wishes.

With the 4 elements or states of matter as they are currently presented, compare what the sages are to teach from the Torah. Especialy in vayikra to the tribe of Levi which yochanon(john the Baptist) was born. While visiting the Shekinah the Lord showed me many things before I ever read the Holy scripture.

Blessings Always

Edited by pinacled

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One might wonder if "scary" thoughts or anxiety in general indicate a lack of faith, but the Bible does not support such a view.  After all, living as we do during “critical times hard to deal with,” it is virtually impossible not to experience anxiety to some degree (2 Timothy 3:1). Faithful Christians cope with daily anxieties that are triggered by poor health, old age, economic pressures, family strife, crime, and other problems. Even in ancient times, God’s servants faced fears and worries.

Consider for example the Bible account of Lot. God instructed him to escape to the mountains to avoid being swept away in the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah. Lot, however, became anxious. He said: “Not that, please, God!” Hesitantly, he continued: “But I—I am not able to escape to the mountainous region for fear calamity may keep close to me and I certainly die.” Why did Lot fear the mountains? The Bible does not say. Whatever the reason, Lot felt quite intimidated. How did God react? Was Lot disciplined for lack of faith or trust in God? No. On the contrary, God showed consideration, allowing Lot to escape to a nearby city—Genesis 19:18-22.

There are other Bible examples of faithful worshipers who became very anxious at times. The prophet Elijah became afraid and ran away after receiving a death threat. (1 Kings 19:1-4) Moses, Hannah, David, Habakkuk, Paul, and other men and women of strong faith also expressed anxieties. (Exodus 4:10; 1 Samuel 1:6; Psalm 55:5; Habakkuk 1:2, 3; 2 Corinthians 11:28) Yet, God showed compassion and continued to use them in his service, thereby manifesting a real understanding of imperfect humans.

Persistent anxiety, however, can wear us down and lead to loss of trust in God. The apostle Paul referred to lack of faith as “the sin that easily entangles us.” (Hebrews 12:1) By including himself, Paul was likely admitting his own propensity to get ‘easily entangled’ in episodes of momentary weakness of faith.  Perhaps this was the case with Zechariah when he did not believe the angel who informed him that his wife would become pregnant. On one occasion Jesus’ apostles were unable to perform a cure because of their “little faith.” However, these individuals continued to enjoy God’s approval—Matthew 17:18-20; Luke 1:18, 20, 67; John 17:26.

On the other hand, the Bible also includes examples of people who lost their trust in God and suffered serious consequences. For instance, many Israelites who left Egypt were barred from entering the Promised Land because of their lack of faith. In one incident they even spoke directly against God, saying: “Why have you brought us up out of Egypt to die in the wilderness? For there is no bread and no water.” Indicative of God’s displeasure, poisonous snakes were sent to punish them—Numbers 21:5, 6.

The inhabitants of Jesus’ hometown, Nazareth, missed the privilege of seeing more miracles performed in their territory because they lacked faith. Further, the wicked generation of that day received a scathing denunciation from Jesus because of lack of faith (Matthew 13:58; 17:17; Hebrews 3:19). Appropriately, the apostle Paul warned: “Beware, brothers, for fear there should ever develop in any one of you a wicked heart lacking faith by drawing away from the living God”—Hebrews 3:12.

Yes, in extreme cases lack of faith could result from a wicked heart. But this was not the case with Zechariah and Jesus’ apostles in the examples previously mentioned. Their lack of faith was due to momentary weakness. Their general pattern of life showed that they were “pure in heart.”—Matthew 5:8.

The Scriptures help us to make a distinction between general anxiety and the sin of lack of faith. Daily feelings of anxiety or even a momentary lapse of faith because of human weakness should not be confused with the complete lack of trust in God that springs from a wicked, unresponsive heart. Christians, therefore, need not be plagued by guilt just because they periodically experience anxiety.

Nevertheless, caution is necessary so that anxiety does not grow out of proportion and dominate our lives. Hence, the wisdom of Jesus’ words when he said: “Never be anxious and say, ‘What are we to eat?’ or, ‘What are we to drink?’ or, ‘What are we to put on?’” This he followed with the comforting words: “For your heavenly Father knows you need all these things. Keep on, then, seeking first the kingdom and his righteousness, and all these other things will be added to you”—Matthew 6:25-33.

May a calm peace be upon all here...

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1 hour ago, pinacled said:

Being that murder is the unforgivable

I was always of the understanding that it was this:

Matthew 12:31 Wherefore I say unto you, all manner of sin and blasphemy will be forgiven unto men: but the blasphemy against the Holy Ghost shall not be forgiven unto men. KJV  

Shalom, 

David/BeauJangles

Edited by BeauJangles
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14 minutes ago, BeauJangles said:

I was always was of the understanding that it was this:

Matthew 12:31 Wherefore I say unto you, all manner of sin and blasphemy will be forgiven unto men: but the blasphemy against the Holy Ghost shall not be forgiven unto men. KJV  

Shalom, 

David/BeauJangles

And with honey offered in the spirit of understanding pure lips are unlike those without knowledge.

As for a laying on of hands, remember the oil given the 5.

Ears, Eyes, hands, feet.

Blessings Always

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