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Leyla

Question about Genetic-Engineering

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Posted (edited)

Is it okay to genetically modifiy animals, food and humans or do you think its against Gods plan or his creation?

Edited by Leyla
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No, it is not ok. Genetic engineering interferes with the God-ordained process of life. 

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Posted (edited)
5 minutes ago, missmuffet said:

No, it is not ok. Genetic engineering interferes with the God-ordained process of life. 

How can we differentiate between what is gods plan and what not? Is taking medicine to heal a fatal sickness interfering with gods plan aswell? Genetic modifcations have the potential to help many people

Edited by Leyla

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Posted (edited)

Double post, excuse me for that

Edited by Leyla

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1 hour ago, Leyla said:

How can we differentiate between what is God's plan and what is not? Is taking medicine to heal a fatal sickness interfering with God's plan as well? Genetic modifications have the potential to help many people

Praying to God for guidance, reading the Bible, using our conscience wisely, and running the idea by fellow Christians.  Taking medicine is fine.  There are good ways to use genetic modification such as creating a cure for an otherwise incurable disease but it shouldn't be used in a selfish way or in an effort to play god.

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Everything is genetically modified these days. The vegies and fruits you eat were long since genetically modified in some way. Even if it was just seeds grown from plants that exhibited a particular desirable trait, it was modified. If you wear cotton, chances are it was grown from btcotton, a variety that has botulism toxin coded into it to protect it from boll weevils. Something that has been done for 40 yrs or so. If you use insulin, it is likely to be humulin, a genetic mix of human and e coli material. There are genetic repairs for various diseases that encode a proper gene on to a virus and inset it into people. That repairs a gene and cures a genetic illness in some folks. None of that is playing God. But if it bothers you, then you do not have to use any of it. 

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Let me use corn as an example. For awhile folks were upset over gmo corn. And given how it affects the monarch butterflies, perhaps it is right to be concerned over it. However the original corn was a tiny thing. In my archaeology days, we used to excavate old corn cobs that are hundreds of years old. Even those were not the original size. Over time the seeds were selected to grow larger and larger ears. That may not be what folks think of as "genetically modified", but it was still changed from the original genetic material. 

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4 minutes ago, ayin jade said:

Let me use corn as an example. For awhile folks were upset over gmo corn. And given how it affects the monarch butterflies, perhaps it is right to be concerned over it. However the original corn was a tiny thing. In my archaeology days, we used to excavate old corn cobs that are hundreds of years old. Even those were not the original size. Over time the seeds were selected to grow larger and larger ears. That may not be what folks think of as "genetically modified", but it was still changed from the original genetic material. 

years back i read a report about gmo corn fed to lab rats for 5 generations and they began to have infertility problems.  chicken feed is mostly corn and right now in the chicken industry there are cases of infertility problems.  Not sure how wide spread it is.  it is debatable whether its gmo corn or the growth hormones they pump the chickens full of.   it would take someone a whole lot smarter than I am to figure it out.  the chicken industry is pretty secretive and closed off anyway.  anyone who wants to raise their own meat chickens and has done their homework knows this first hand as the standard white cornish, which is the ultimate terminal sire for meat birds, is only to be found in all of america from two places for sale to the public both of which are limited due to being private farms.  and out of those two only one is really a viable option.  everywhere else the white cornish is not standard breed but bantam.  there is also a big controversy over if these chickens in the meat industry are gmo also, of which i do not really care.  seems to me like a good chance of it since they are not available to the public, and they have some kind of patent on these chickens.  

because of gmo its also hard to find a lot of flowering plants, trees, and veggies anymore.  they usually carry the title heritage variety or something like that.  the new gmo stuff sold in stores do not do as well, some dont even make seeds.  I also hear a lot of older ladies who are into gardening and flowers saying... you cant get those anymore. 

I am not really a fan of gmo.  i can see a potential benefit in some applications such as the one you mentioned about boll weevils, but i would not participate in doing it if a job was offered to me. 

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5 minutes ago, Cletus said:

years back i read a report about gmo corn fed to lab rats for 5 generations and they began to have infertility problems.  chicken feed is mostly corn and right now in the chicken industry there are cases of infertility problems.  Not sure how wide spread it is.  it is debatable whether its gmo corn or the growth hormones they pump the chickens full of.   it would take someone a whole lot smarter than I am to figure it out.  the chicken industry is pretty secretive and closed off anyway.  anyone who wants to raise their own meat chickens and has done their homework knows this first hand as the standard white cornish, which is the ultimate terminal sire for meat birds, is only to be found in all of america from two places for sale to the public both of which are limited due to being private farms.  and out of those two only one is really a viable option.  everywhere else the white cornish is not standard breed but bantam.  there is also a big controversy over if these chickens in the meat industry are gmo also, of which i do not really care.  seems to me like a good chance of it since they are not available to the public, and they have some kind of patent on these chickens.  

because of gmo its also hard to find a lot of flowering plants, trees, and veggies anymore.  they usually carry the title heritage variety or something like that.  the new gmo stuff sold in stores do not do as well, some dont even make seeds.  I also hear a lot of older ladies who are into gardening and flowers saying... you cant get those anymore. 

I am not really a fan of gmo.  i can see a potential benefit in some applications such as the one you mentioned about boll weevils, but i would not participate in doing it if a job was offered to me. 

They do not produce seeds because companies want you to keep buying seeds from them. Otherwise they do not make enough money to survive. I never thought about how they do that but I guess that is gmo too. 

The use of hormones and antibiotics in raising animals is a big concern. To me, it is bigger than gmo concerns. 

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3 minutes ago, ayin jade said:

They do not produce seeds because companies want you to keep buying seeds from them. Otherwise they do not make enough money to survive. I never thought about how they do that but I guess that is gmo too. 

The use of hormones and antibiotics in raising animals is a big concern. To me, it is bigger than gmo concerns. 

from what i have read the growth hormones cause females to mature/age faster, and in males it causes prostate problems.  I think i speak for all males when i say, I could really do without prostate problems due to a bite to eat. 

they tend to advertise heavy on no antibiotics used when they do use growth hormones.  certain antibiotics are ok, such as Hygromycin B, which i have fed to my chickens.  there is no transfer to eggs, only a three day withdrawal period for cull and eat, and its safe to give continuously and is ok for everything from canaries to ostrich, and it does them good in lots of ways.   I do not think the chicken industry uses this tho.  there are some stories i have heard from people using certain antibiotics that do transfer to the eggs and when they tried to incubate the eggs the chicks that hatched were deformed/mutant looking.  

I tend to agree with you on antibiotics and growth hormones being a much bigger problem... but i will also say I am no expert on the full effects... but what i have seen/heard it seems to be an extremely logical conclusion. 

I think most everything to eat in the stores these days are some way, somehow gmo. 

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