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Avenge not yourselves

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Title: Strong Composure

Author: Mrs. Charles E. Cowman
Source: Streams in the Desert
Scripture Reference: Romans 12:19-19

"Dearly beloved, avenge not yourselves" (Rom. 12:19).

There are seasons when to be still demands immeasurably higher strength than to act. Composure is often the highest result of power. To the vilest and most deadly charges Jesus responded with deep, unbroken silence, such as excited the wonder of the judge and the spectators. To the grossest insults, the most violent ill-treatment and mockery that might well bring indignation into the feeblest heart, He responded with voiceless complacent calmness. Those who are unjustly accused, and causelessly ill-treated know what tremendous strength is necessary to keep silence to God.

"Men may misjudge thy aim,
Think they have cause to blame,
Say, thou art wrong;
Keep on thy quiet way,
Christ is the Judge, not they,
Fear not, be strong."

St. Paul said, "None of these things move me."

He did not say, none of these things hurt me. It is one thing to be hurt, and quite another to be moved. St. Paul had a very tender heart. We do not read of any apostle who cried as St. Paul did. It takes a strong man to cry. Jesus wept, and He was the manliest Man that ever lived. So it does not say, none of these things hurt me. But the apostle had determined not to move from what he believed was right. He did not count as we are apt to count; he did not care for ease; he did not care for this mortal life. He cared for only one thing, and that was to be loyal to Christ, to have His smile. To St. Paul, more than to any other man, His work was wages, His smile was Heaven.
--Margaret Bottome

This classic devotional is the unabridged edition of Streams in the Desert. This first edition was published in 1925 and the wording is preserved as originally written. Connotations of words may have changed over the years and are not meant to be offensive.
 

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This devotional is freely distributed by Back To The Bible.
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Hi @Debp

Thank you for sharing that. It is great to be reminded how Jesus responded to unfair treatment and we must walk in step with Him and through Him. He is the judge, not other people and not us.

Becky.

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Yes, it's best to leave others that misjudge us in God's hands.   Keeping our peace in our hearts in Christ.   Perhaps in the future they will realize they thought wrongly of us.   But God knows it all whatever happens.

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An on time, timely message for me!

I've been going through severe emotional distress regarding a situation that happened to me while at work but now The Lord has just been saturating me with His Word on how He is my avenger. There's nothing i could do on my own that would outdo God's justice. So this post is confirmation for me, hallelujah!!! He wants me to rest in Him and stop revisiting those hurtful memories and completely forgive and move on in my walk with Him.

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      Title: Wait With Patience

      Author: Mrs. Charles E. Cowman
      Source: Streams in the Desert
      Scripture Reference: Psalm 37:7

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      This classic devotional is the unabridged edition of Streams in the Desert. This first edition was published in 1925 and the wording is preserved as originally written. Connotations of words may have changed over the years and are not meant to be offensive.
       
      ____________________

      This devotional is freely distributed by Back To The Bible.
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      This classic devotional is the unabridged edition of Streams in the Desert. This first edition was published in 1925 and the wording is preserved as originally written. Connotations of words may have changed over the years and are not meant to be offensive.
       
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      This devotional is freely distributed by Back To The Bible.
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      This classic devotional is the unabridged edition of Streams in the Desert. This first edition was published in 1925 and the wording is preserved as originally written. Connotations of words may have changed over the years and are not meant to be offensive.
       
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      This devotional is freely distributed by Back To The Bible.
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      This classic devotional is the unabridged edition of Streams in the Desert. This first edition was published in 1925 and the wording is preserved as originally written. Connotations of words may have changed over the years and are not meant to be offensive.
       
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      This devotional is freely distributed by Back To The Bible.
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      This classic devotional is the unabridged edition of Streams in the Desert. This first edition was published in 1925 and the wording is preserved as originally written. Connotations of words may have changed over the years and are not meant to be offensive.

      _________________________

      This devotional is freely distributed by Back To The Bible.
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