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The Sheep

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11 hours ago, Prodigal Son said:

This topic makes me sad because of the ultimate fate of the sheep as well their treatment these days.

Have u guys ever slaughtered a lamb? Have u seen the treatment of sheep in the wool industry? Have u seen the conditions the sheep endure in live transport? Have u seen how lamb is kept, like veil? No shepherds? Have u seen how they kill sheep in the slaughter house?

Sorry guys for being so negative i'll make up for it ok.

I just have so much empathy for the sheep. Watch it and you'll see. BAAA... BANG. It's heart breaking.

Look at what it did to Clarice in the film Silence of the Lambs. Growing up on a farm seeing the lambs get slaughtered, it stayed with her for life in the form of a tormenting repressed memory.

One of my mates, Ange, dad had a farm. When he was a child his dad got a lamb. It was adorable. Ange got attached to it like a pet. Being a family that went hunting his dad wanted to teach him how to slaughter, skin and butcher. So he gave the boy Ange the knife and told him to slice the lambs throat. Ange was in tears, he couldn't do it. In one motion his dad grabbed the knife and slit the lambs throat causing blood to spray everywhere. In tears and covered in lambs blood Ange ran off, traumatized. You can tell even today by the way tells that story.

Ok no more sad stories

BA BA black sheep have u any wool? Yes sir, yes sir three bags full. Or...

Mary had a little lamb whose fleece was white as snow. Awww how cute... BAA... White as snow.

A friend and I went on a snow trip to New Zealand, known for having more sheep than people. At first we would be out the window of our hire car yelling BAAA every time we'd past a heard. It was funny at first but got old really quick.

I understand my friend. I'm a shepherd who watches over a small herd of dairy goats (and manages the dogs who protect them) so I appreciate where you're coming from. Who's the one who euthanizes those animals that are doomed? The lady, not me. I don't have the mettle for it @Prodigal Son. My first experience with this happened my 2nd year out here when I came upon an old buck who wasn't able to get up off the ground. We knew this was coming sooner or later...

I brought him feed and water which he happily inhaled while continuing to lie helplessly on the ground. I moved a tray full of sweet feed just out of his reach, walking away to tend to other matters for a little while. When I returned to check on his progress he hadn't moved a muscle... if he couldn't move himself for sweet feed then he wasn't going anywhere: his time had come. I informed the lady whom, after verifying the truth for herself knew what had to be done. She'd put him down quickly so the old goat wouldn't suffer lying helplessly on his side...

She did the deed. I couldn't imagine doing something like that to the old goat I met a few years before. He was great (very well-behaved!) and unobtrusive, the sort of goat who would come to you when you called his name. I agreed that it needed to be done, however, so I didn't oppose putting him down.

Over the years I've watched and occasionally assisted goat mothers during the birthing process; there's hardly a creature more adorable than a baby goat! I've watched some of these little ones suddenly die, often without warning, taking us by surprise and crushing my heart. We've tried to save some of the doomed ones but no matter what we tried to do, they perished anyway. 

I'm their pallbearer because that's something the lady can't bear to do herself. When winter comes and the does are looking pregnant (January and February are when births take place) I wonder how many little ones I'll have to take away this time. In this way I dread kidding season (juvenile goats are called kids) even though they're a joy to deal with. They're precious! :)

Remember that all flesh is like grass (1 Peter 1:24) and so our time in this world is never a sure bet, friend. We're fragile and (fortunately) won't abide in this flesh forever. That's helping me cope with the cycle of life and death I see unfolding all around me up here.   

Edited by DustyRoad
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1 hour ago, Willa said:

After watching the border collie working with the shepherd I thought of this psalm.  The dog watches the shepherd's gaze.  

Back in the states I owed 10 acres in the country, we brought home a small adorable puppy that my girls fell in love with on first sight, she had two different colored eyes, they named her Tizzy, since the land was on the eastern side of the coastal mountains it was hilly where we lived, ...a good place to ride three wheelers, ... as she grew and matured, when we took off on them, she would run along side of me and jump up on the gas tank and go for a ride, ...one day the neighbor came over to talk and he spotted Tizzy, ...told us she was an Australian shepherd, ...we didn't know, ...then one day another neighbor's milk cow broke down the fence and roamed about on our land, I watched Tizzy as she went on "full alert," watching the cow and turning her head and looking me in  the eye, just like you said, ...I said, "go Tizzy," and off she went, ...she herded that cow back through the hole in the fence right up to the neighbor's house, ...I was in total amazement, where did she learn that?  Certainly not from running and jumping onto a three wheeler gas tank!

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51 minutes ago, JustPassingThru said:

Back in the states I owed 10 acres in the country, we brought home a small adorable puppy that my girls fell in love with on first sight, she had two different colored eyes, they named her Tizzy, since the land was on the eastern side of the coastal mountains it was hilly where we lived, ...a good place to ride three wheelers, ... as she grew and matured, when we took off on them, she would run along side of me and jump up on the gas tank and go for a ride, ...one day the neighbor came over to talk and he spotted Tizzy, ...told us she was an Australian shepherd, ...we didn't know, ...then one day another neighbor's milk cow broke down the fence and roamed about on our land, I watched Tizzy as she went on "full alert," watching the cow and turning her head and looking me in  the eye, just like you said, ...I said, "go Tizzy," and off she went, ...she herded that cow back through the hole in the fence right up to the neighbor's house, ...I was in total amazement, where did she learn that?  Certainly not from running and jumping onto a three wheeler gas tank!

They are amazing cattle dogs and were bred in the USA, not Australia.  I watched a cowboy on a quarter horse working with a cattle dog to cut and herd cows.  It was pretty amazing.  The horse and dog worked in sync to get the cow to move where they wanted it.  I am sure the Cowboy was communicating with his legs but it looked like the horse and dog were working together and the rider was just trying to stay on the horse.  

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3 hours ago, Willa said:

That is why the Passover lamb is taken into the home for several days to be inspected before  it is slaughtered.  It teaches just how much it cost the Father to see His own innocent Son to be tortured and slaughtered as He was going to and upon the cross.

 

I believe it was Zola Levitt Who taught that the baby lamb was to be made a pet , everybody was to be fond of the cute little things .The point was to make it painful .A picture of God’s pain   as He sacrificed His Son.I read somewhere that 3 billion sheep were sacrificed during the years that The Temple was operating.....

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5 hours ago, DustyRoad said:

I'm a shepherd who watches over a small herd of dairy goats

Hello Dusty my friend. In a small Australian town with a church, that would be nice. I hate city life. I feel closer to God in the country.

From memory but your town is like the wild west. Move down here to Stralia mate ud love it. I'll come and visit you... Lol

5 hours ago, DustyRoad said:

Who's the one who euthanizes those animals that are doomed?

@DustyRoad NNOOOOO

5 hours ago, DustyRoad said:

The lady, not me. I don't have the mettle for it

Whew. Not that it's wrong. I could be a butcher no probs. Get the caucus and slice it up. But I couldn't handle doing the slaughtering.

There was a thread in another forum i think about the differences in slaughtering practices between Christians, Jews and Muslims. It was both interesting and heart breaking to watch. I found the practices of the milk/veil industry to be the worse and still wonder if that is ok with God. Slaughtering for meat isn't a problem. I don't think milking them is a problem. But they artificially impregnate a cow to make her produce milk and steal her calf. It then gets tied up so that it can hardly move making the veil flesh tender. Add to this the fact that they have been bread to produce way too much milk. The extra strain on the cows shortens their life span greatly.

God doesn't approve of this i don't think. So may sins in there i feel I should boycott dairy and veil. But i'd be a hypocrite unless I went full vegan cos the slaughtering methods, living conditions, castration methods (painfully cringe worthy) and other practices across all big farming are devastating.

5 hours ago, DustyRoad said:

I've watched and occasionally assisted goat mothers during the birthing process; there's hardly a creature more adorable than a baby goat

Awww. How cute are they... Bleeping BBaaa. And their fleece after their washed really is as white as snow.

5 hours ago, DustyRoad said:

I'm their pallbearer because that's something the lady can't bear to do herself

You can't consume it? I guess without knowing the cause of death it would be too risky

5 hours ago, DustyRoad said:

That's helping me cope with the cycle of life and death I see unfolding all around me up here.

Interesting that. City folk aren't exposed to that cycle of death much. An advantage or not...

When my mums budgie died i wanted to get her another. But she refused it for about 4 years. I first thought it was because she didn't want to replace him but she revealed it is the heart break of loosing the pet that she hates. I felt like awww thats my mothers love. But I feel being exposed to the death of pets is good in a way thats hard to explain. It makes you contemplate life, God and after life. Brings u back to reality. Prepares you for the death of loved ones. Makes u stronger. U know what I mean.

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5 hours ago, Willa said:

They are amazing cattle dogs and were bred in the USA, not Australia

Mate, poor choice... Stralia has the best herding dog breeds... LoL. I dunno. Im just playing 

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Enjoying this thread.  If seems that sheep-like is just how the Father views the human race, and reading through all the posts we get the sense of how perfect an analogy it is.  Sheep are child-like and easily led......helpless and vulnerable.....they can't manage at all without a Shepherd to guide them.  It's interesting that Jesus said He SENDS us out as sheep among wolves, and so I'm sure there is purpose in that.  Something to think about.  How we need our Good Shepherd every moment of every day to help us.

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On 12/1/2019 at 10:06 AM, maryjayne said:

Sheep also need to be in flocks of at least 5. Otherwise they can pine and die.

@maryjayne :)Thanks for all the fascinating info you have been sharing. I dub you the sheep expert here.:mgqueen: This fact about how important it is that they be with others is in keeping with what Charles Spurgeon had to say:

Quote

"Some Christians try to go to heaven alone, in solitude. But believers are not compared to bears or lions or other animals that wander alone. Those who belong to Christ are sheep in this respect, that they love to get together. Sheep go in flocks, and so do God’s people.” Charles Spurgeon

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19 hours ago, Willa said:

They are amazing cattle dogs and were bred in the USA, not Australia.  I watched a cowboy on a quarter horse working with a cattle dog to cut and herd cows.  It was pretty amazing.  The horse and dog worked in sync to get the cow to move where they wanted it.  I am sure the Cowboy was communicating with his legs but it looked like the horse and dog were working together and the rider was just trying to stay on the horse.  

As is the Australian cattle dog or queensland heeler .    

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1 hour ago, frienduff thaylorde said:

As is the Australian cattle dog or queensland heeler .    

I have no idea why they were called Australian Cattle dogs because they were from the US.

 

22 hours ago, Willa said:

They are amazing cattle dogs and were bred in the USA, not Australia.  I watched a cowboy on a quarter horse working with a cattle dog to cut and herd cows.  It was pretty amazing.  The horse and dog worked in sync to get the cow to move where they wanted it.  I am sure the Cowboy was communicating with his legs but it looked like the horse and dog were working together and the rider was just trying to stay on the horse.  

Sorry, my mistake.  I had them confused with Australian Shepherds which were Basque but first traveled to Australia?  before coming to western US where they completed crossing them till they excelled in the environment.  They are an excellent working and herding dog.  They often have each eye of a different color. I always laughed because a guy claimed he had the first ones made available outside of continental Australia, but they were not from Australia.  He just liked to tell tall tales.  

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