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Marnie

Why Kosher??

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Why Kosher Certified food? Do Jews have to eat it? First, let me say it is my OPINION only that NO, we do not. I stand on the words of Paul:

Whatsoever is sold in the shambles, that eat, asking no question for conscience sake: For the earth is the Lord's, and the fulness thereof. If any of them that believe not bid you to a feast, and ye be disposed to go; whatsoever is set before you, eat, asking no question for conscience sake. 1 Cor. 10:25-27, KJV

So why Kosher? I love it! No other reason. But here are the traditional reasons for eating KC foods.

Wherever Jews have lived, from the ancient Middle East to the modern Americas, they have eaten the local foods. So what are Jewish foods? They are those local foods which are allowed by halakha and, in some cases, developed or adapted to meet Jewish needs. Jewish cuisine is not only East-European food. Every Jewish community -- Ashkenazic, Sephardic, Yemenite, Italian and others -- has met the requirements of Judaism in its own way and with its own cuisine.

Reasons, other than kashruth, for Jewish cuisine include:

1. Shabbat: Two Shabbat rules, in particular, have influenced the development of Jewish food. One is the prohibition against removing the unwanted parts of a mixture, such as the bones from fish. This resulted in the development of gefilte fish, which (at least in theory) has no bones.

Better known is the rule against putting things up to cook on Shabbat. Since stews, and other long cooking items may be put up before Shabbat, a range of such dishes was developed. The most well known of these is "cholent" (called "hamin" by Sephardic Jews).

2. Holidays: The effect of the Passover on Jewish food cannot be covered here; there are many, many effects on Jewish cooking to be considered when discussing Passover.

Rosh Hashanah, with its emphasis on sweet things, has led to honey cake and "taigelech." A pun on the Yiddish word for carrots -- "mehren" -- which can also mean "to increase", has led to carrot tzimmes. Shavuot, characterized by dairy foods, has led to blintzes and cheesecakes.

What makes up Kosher food?

The basic concepts of kosher food: no mixing of dairy and meat; no pork or pork products; no shell fish.

This also applies to food products containing such ingredients. For example, a food coloring made from a shell fish would be considered unkosher and would taint the food in which it might be used. Similarly, using, e.g., an animal fat together with dairy ingredients renders the product unkosher and taints even the implements used in making it.

If a recipe is not in keeping with these basic requirements, consider whether substitutions can be made to adjust it for "kashruth" (e.g., substituting margarine for butter in a meat recipe).

Meat

Allowed: Beef Veal Venison Mutton Lamb

Not allowed: Any animal which does not both chew its cud and have a split hoof, such as rabbit or hare, pig, horse, dog or cat.

Poultry and other fowl

The Torah names the bird species which are not kosher. Since we are not certain to which birds all of these ancient Hebrew names refer, only birds which traditionally have been eaten are allowed; primarily, domesticated fowl.

Allowed: Chicken Turkey Quail Cornish Hens Doves/Pigeon (Squab) Goose Duck Pheasant

Not allowed: Birds of prey

Fish

Allowed: Fish must have both fins and scales that are detachable from the skin. All fish which have them are allowed.

Not Allowed: All shellfish (shrimp, lobster, clams, oysters, scallops, etc.) and crustaceans (crabs, crayfish/crawfish, etc.)

Scavengers/"Bottom-feeders" (such as catfish, monkfish), unless they have fins and scales. Sturgeon (and, by extension, sturgeon caviar) and swordfish -- some Conservative opinion finds these acceptable.

Fruits, Vegetables and Grains

All fruits, vegetables and grains are allowed.

Grape Products: Because of the sacramental dimension of wine in Judaism, a special body of laws governs grape products. Kashruth-observant Jews use only those grape products which have proper supervision. This applies to wine, grape juice, grape jelly, vinegar, and all soft drinks that use white grape juice as a sweetener. It does not apply to fresh grapes or raisins.

NOTE: All kosher Israeli wines are produced under conditions of Passover kashruth. They are, thus, all KLP (Kosher l'Pesach) year round.

Separation of Meat from Dairy Products

Meat and dairy ingredients must not be mixed together.

>Milk dishes must be cooked and eaten separately from meat dishes.

>Meat dishes must be cooked and eaten separately from milk dishes.

This prohibition against mixing dairy and meat also extends to the plates, cutlery, utensils and cooking vessels used in association with them, necessitating a full set of each in a kosher kitchen. In addition, many keep additional sets and equipment which are pareve (neutral).

Cheese

Although cheeses are dairy, some cheeses are not kosher if they are made with animal-origin rennet from a non-kosher animal. The Conservative movement has a broader definition of kosher cheeses. Sephardic tradition considers glass dishes to be neutral.

Pareve, or Neutral Foods

Fish, eggs, vegetables, fruits and grains may be eaten with either milk or meat dishes.

NOTE: Some communities do not permit fish and meat to be cooked together, and some do not permit fish and dairy to be cooked together. They may, however, be served at the same meal on separate dishes and with separate utensils.

Pareve (neutral) cooking oils such as vegetable oils and shortenings may be used with both milk and meat dishes.

Flour, without dairy additives, is pareve.

All this material is public domain and available all over the 'net. A good resource for KC material is Kashrut: Jewish Dietary Laws. Now, as I said at the beginning, I do not believe anybody needs to follow Jewish dietary laws; Jesus fulfilled the Law, therefore in Him we fulfill the Law. This is not debatable for me. However, KC food is wonderful to prepare and to eat. Mike has come to love it. If you are looking for ethnic food other than Italian (also my favorite) or Mexican (yep, another favorite of ours) try Kosher cooking. Or even Yiddish!

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I just thought of something. I am not going to repost any of my recipes already posted in the Ladies Lounge. There is a lengthy thread there, Marnie's Kitchen. If you care, you can go to that thread and sift through a ton of Kosher and non-kosher recipes I have posted over the past few weeks. If you are a guy, sorry, the Ladies Lounge is off limits. You may PM me for those recipes.

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I don't know how to get to the ladies lounge. :)

I am such a nerd :blink:

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I don't know how to get to the ladies lounge. :)

I am such a nerd :blink:

You need to PM a moderator, get the password, and then you are all set.

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Thanks marnie. I'll see if i can even figure that out :)

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Shalom,

For clarity sake, there is a major difference between BIBLICAL Kosher (that is following G-d's commands of clean/unclean animals) and what is Rabbinical Kosher (that is rules and regs made up by the rabbis). One of these is the no milk and meat rule. But since G-d did not say that in His Word, it is not Biblical Kosher.

Our family DOES eat according to the Scriptures and the commands concerning clean/unclean animals. We DO NOT follow the rabbinical rules for Kashrut.

There is great benefit in eating this way, both physically and spiritually.

The rules are much easier than the rabbinical version :21: It is simply according to the Scriptures of what to eat and what not to eat. No two sets of dishes and all that.

The clean / unclean lists can be found in Leviticus 11

BTW, a vegetarian is Biblically Kosher.

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Good points, Vic. Thanks. I was meaning to address that but time got away.

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Do you keep a kosher kitchen marnie?? seems to me that would be a lot of work! :thumbsup:

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Do you keep a kosher kitchen marnie?? seems to me that would be a lot of work! :thumbsup:

:) You know, lots of people ask me that. The short answer is no, I do not, although I cook a lot Kosher meals simply because I like them. Many of the Rabbinical laws governing dietary laws are not found in the Torah, but are extensions of it. Aren't you glad you aren't a Jew? I remember growing up, I had to not only learn what the Torah taught, but also what our Rabbi taught. Most confusing. This is why Christianity is so liberating! It literally gives one the feeling of a prisoner being set free! Now, having said that, there is something very special about Kosher food. When you are preparing it, you have great sense of history, in that you have the knowledge that your ancestors prepared the meal in the same way; that you are part of something much bigger than yourself. But, I don't want to get all metaphysical on you; I am sure if you are not a Jew, then what I just wrote is basically hippie talk.

Anyway, try some of these. Mike would highly recommend the blintz's.

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Okay, showing my stupidty here, but whats the difference between Kosher & Yiddish???

:thumbsup:

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