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The Barbarian

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  1. Chocolate Chili. Sounds horrible, but when I serve it, I get recipe requests. Not really that different from mole.
  2. I think I can do the mustache, but the other might be a problem...
  3. https://www.nestandglow.com/life/why-ruby-chocolate-is-fake If you like it, fine. It's just mostly unfermented cacao, with only about 5% actual cocoa, and some citric acid added to make it tart. Because it's not fully fermented, it's reddish and lacks the complex chocolate flavors that come from the fermentation process. It's got a fairly high content of cacao butter, however. Edit: And it's less expensive to make, of course.
  4. My wife has a T-shirt: "Give me the chocolate, and nobody gets hurt."
  5. Ears. Who would think your ears would get hairy? Have to trim them periodically. Eyebrows, too. And after 72 years of thick, bushy hair, my forehead is getting higher.
  6. When you're a man, and young women open doors for you... you start to wonder. I was at an OLLI session (college classes for retirees) and looking around, I thought "what am I doing here with all these old people?"
  7. It's directly observed to happen. Can't get more factual than that. The scientific definition is "change in allele frequency in a population over time." So, it would nicely fit this issue, of humans changing but remaining people. For example, if we found a way to stop telomeres from dropping off our DNA at each cell division, then we'd prevent aging and eventual death from aging. We'd still be humans, however. No speciation. It is true, though that even most creationist organizations now accept the fact of speciation, often accepting the evolution of new genera and even families of organisms. Far beyond what this OP is suggesting. Seems like a paltry deal, compared to eternity. Just saying.
  8. God told Adam that he would die the day he ate from the tree. Adam eats, and lives on physically for many years thereafter. So we know that the "death" was not a physical one. It was a spiritual death, brought about by disobedience, which separated us from God. If Jesus came to save us from physical death, He failed; we will all die someday. But he saved us from the death Adam brought into the world.
  9. It's like asking where the center of the surface of the Earth is. It's wherever you happen to be. Hence the Chinese name for China; 中国 "the middle kingdom." From their view, it was at the center of the Earth's surface.
  10. Yes. Most YE creationist organizations admit that new species, genera, and even families of organisms evolve. But that's about as far as they are willing to go.
  11. Since there's a mathematical definition of "information", it's easy to test. According to Claude Shannon's theorem, information is: Where: H= information and p(x) equals the frequency of allele x in the population. So, consider if we have a gene with 2 alleles (different versions of the same gene), each with a frequency of 0.5, we can find the information for that gene to be the negative sum of the products of the frequencies and the log of the frequencies. So then -2(0.5 X log(0.5)), which is about 0.301. Now, suppose a new allele happens by mutation and eventually each allele has a frequency of about one-third. Then it would be -3(0.333..X log(.0333..)) or about o.477. Hence, any new mutation in a population increases the information in the population genome. However, evolution can work just as well by decreasing information. Evolution is a change in the allele frequencies of a population over time, so if for some reason, one of the alleles go extinct, and only two remain, the information will then be about 0.301 again, In fact, because speciation often happens in small, isolated populations, it is frequently the case that the new species will at first have less information than the species from which it evolved. Since all organisms have dozens of mutations (almost all of them neutral) that weren't in either parent, this usually changes over time.
  12. Democritus of Abdera showed, by experiment, that matter must be made up of extremely tiny particles. He called them "atoms"("you can't cut them into smaller bits") about 500 years before Paul wrote that verse. Every educated person in the Greco-Roman world knew about it. But I don't think that's what Paul was writing about. Certainly, there's nothing therein about "atomic structure." The theory of Democritus held that everything is composed of "atoms", which are physically, but not geometrically, indivisible; that between atoms, there lies empty space; that atoms are indestructible, and have always been and always will be in motion; that there is an infinite number of atoms and of kinds of atoms, which differ in shape and size. Of the mass of atoms, Democritus said, "The more any indivisible exceeds, the heavier it is". However, his exact position on atomic weight is disputed. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Democritus
  13. Barbarian observes: Actually, the discovery of the mechanism of inheritance cleared up a difficult problem for Darwin's theory. You see, if heredity was like mixing paint (as scientists in his time thought) then it's difficult to see how a new trait would not be obscured like a drop of red paint in a barrel of white paint. But when it became clear that heredity is more like sorting beads than mixing paint, his theory was again confirmed. That's what I just told you. It's like sorting beads, not like mixing paint. Because it's like sorting beads, it explains why Darwin's theory accurately describes what evolution does. Until scientists realized the way genetics works, Darwin's theory had a big problem. Then it became clear why it does. I highlighted the part you missed.
  14. Actually, the discovery of the mechanism of inheritance cleared up a difficult problem for Darwin's theory. You see, if heredity was like mixing paint (as scientists in his time thought) then it's difficult to see how a new trait would not be obscured like a drop of red paint in a barrel of white paint. But when it became clear that heredity is more like sorting beads than mixing paint, his theory was again confirmed.
  15. Those are two rather different things. I notice scientists like Francis Collins (director of the Human Genome Project) openly express their faith in God, while showing why evolution is a fact.
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