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Pekoudah

Deeper meanings in the Word

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Have you ever read a verse in the bible and saw new meaning in it as if you were reading it for the first time? Even though you had read it many times before?

There are layers of meaning in the bible....especially in the OT....since the gospel was truly hidden at that time. But not so hidden that it can't be revealed by the Spirit and careful study.

i would like to list some of these verses and I hope others will contribute as well.

The goal is to encourage study of the bible for the purpose of edification, encouragement and general biblical understanding.

 

Ok, here is one that kind of sets up all the rest..and shows that God is encouraging us to dig deeper into His word because He has hidden many treasures therein.

It is the glory of God to conceal a matter,
But the glory of kings is to search out a matter.
Prov. 25:2

The word "matter" used here is the Hebrew דבר

Davar...which is better translated as "word". So then God hides meanings in words. He hides words (in plain sight) that have new layers or depths of meaning that convey His will and His ways.

Many of these examples are too difficult to explain in short posts so then I'll try listing only those that can be more readily understood.

(I read the bible in Hebrew as this is something that the Lord told me to do...by saying simply "learn Hebrew"...and from there on I've had a passion for reading the OT in the Hebrew.)
 
 
Edited by Pekoudah
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Here is one that surprisingly few believers know. It brings 2 prophetic verses into one statement by Jesus as He hung on the cross.

That statement is...אלי אלי למה סבכתני or in English transliteration "Eli Eli lama sabachthani" (Mat. 27:46)

Eli Eli Lama sabachthani? refers to the opening words of Psalms 22:1 "My God, my God, why hast Thou forsaken me"

There is a hidden word being used here that ties this statement to another word found in Gen. 22:13

The word "forsaken" has been replaced from "My God My God why have you forsaken Me?" (from Psalm 22:1) for what Jesus said on the cross which actually means... "My God My God why have you entangled Me?" (the word "entangled" coming from Gen. 22:13)

So Jesus fuses these 2 ideas together to make up a new statement.

When Abraham was about to sacrifice Isaac...the angel said "God Himself will provide a sacrifice" and then a ram was seen caught in the thicket. The Hebrew for thicket (entanglement) is סבך which in noun form sounds like "sevach" but in verb form is "sabach" (as in sabachthani meaning "entangled Me" in the past tense).

So then Jesus is claiming to be the sacrifice that God promised to Abraham. To prove this He wore a crown of thorns...as if He was caught Himself in an entanglement...just as the ram.

So then 2 prophecies were fulfilled in one statement and one act...which requires such a depth of sovereignty to accomplish...that it bears meditating on! :)

 
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Here is a harder one that shows the depth of the word. It involves Proverbs 7. This chapter about the "strange woman", which, on the face of it, is about physical adultery and a warning against it. It concerns they who lack "understanding." More on this later.

Prov. 7:7 And beheld among the simple ones, I discerned among the youths, a young man void of understanding,

The Hebrew shows a deeper meaning on a spiritual level. (Should we be surprised at this?) It involves false teaching. Spiritual error.

In Hebrew the words for "strange woman" or...isha zarah... אשה זרה is in the feminine form... and this is an obvious play on words that refers to, and closely resembles, another biblical idea, that of "strange fire"...esh zarah. אש זרה which is the same idea but in masculine form.

In order to get "strange woman" we only have to use the feminine form of "strange fire"...by adding a "hey" (meaning "behold") to the word for "fire". Play on words like this are very common in the OT and are one of the more common ways to convey deeper truths. God likes these. He loves to hide the truth in plain sight. :)

This refers to the dangers of false doctrine...with many warnings and allusions in the chapter to that effect.

If a man has no understanding of the word...then he can be easily "flattered" into believing a lie. He falls prey to what sounds good to the ear..but is meant to deceive and take one into spiritual adultery.

it would take a lot of explaining to get into all the hidden references in the chapter that shows that there is a hidden spiritual message underlying it. How many care to know more about this?

I wonder if anyone wants to try looking for them... :)

 
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To add to this post on Proverbs 7.

Prov. 7:5 That they may keep thee from the strange woman, from the stranger which flattereth with her words.

Prov. 7:21 With her much fair speech she caused him to yield, with the flattering of her lips she forced him.

False doctrine is very appealing to the carnal side of men. That is the target of the fair speech. We notice that a false teacher does not differentiate a person who is living by the power of the flesh and one who lives by the power of the Spirit. The teaching is meant to appeal to the uncrucified...those that still seek advantage for themselves. These are susceptible to flattering words. We all know that God loves us...but this truth is used to extend to the part of us that is in rebellion to God. For many it is difficult to tell the difference between what is life giving and what eventually leads to death. The thing that we see over and over again is the way a lie will seek to flatter a person as they are. As if God loves us in our sin. But God is seeking to love us AWAY from our sin.We need to cultivate a good understanding of God's ways...and what His holiness means to us.

There is more hidden messages in this chapter...for example...who is the "goodman" in the verse below?

Prov. 7:19 For the goodman is not at home, he is gone a long journey:

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the next verse is a big clue...

Pro 7:20  He hath taken a bag of money with him, and will come home at the day appointed.

 

;)  ;) 

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11 minutes ago, Pekoudah said:



There is more hidden messages in this chapter...for example...who is the "goodman" in the verse below?

Prov. 7:19 For the goodman is not at home, he is gone a long journey:

When I saw "goodman"....right or wrong my mind instantly remembered Jesus response to the rich young ruler in Luke:

 

Quote
Now a certain ruler asked Him, saying, “Good Teacher, what shall I do to inherit eternal life?”

 

So Jesus said to him, “Why do you call Me good? No one is good but One, that is, God.

I've found that statement very interesting for a long time.  I don't read Hebrew, but I'm curious....is there any  reason to believe the 'goodman' in the OT passage y0u cited is related  to what Jesus was trying to convey to the rich young ruler?

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7 minutes ago, Jostler said:

When I saw "goodman"....right or wrong my mind instantly remembered Jesus response to the rich young ruler in Luke:

 

I've found that statement very interesting for a long time.  I don't read Hebrew, but I'm curious....is there any  reason to believe the 'goodman' in the OT passage y0u cited is related  to what Jesus was trying to convey to the rich young ruler?

Hey Jostler...yes. The young ruler was speaking idly about something important. Jesus was indeed good...but not in the way the young man was saying it. Jesus was actually Good. So then the goodman in  Prov.7 is indeed Jesus...gone on a long trip.

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10 minutes ago, Cletus said:

the next verse is a big clue...

Pro 7:20  He hath taken a bag of money with him, and will come home at the day appointed.

 

;)  ;) 

"Lay up your treasures in heaven'

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Posted (edited)
7 minutes ago, Pekoudah said:

Hey Jostler...yes. The young ruler was speaking idly about something important. Jesus was indeed good...but not in the way the young man was saying it. Jesus was actually Good. So then the goodman in  Prov.7 is indeed Jesus...gone on a long trip.

thank you for the confirmation :)   Jesus had this wonderful way of subtly revealing who He really was, without DEMANDING others recognize Him.  I thought that might be the parallel and the goodman might be a hidden reference to Jesus.   If it is, then it's not hard to draw parallels between faithfulness to Him while He is away, and spiritual adultery.

I noticed a couple things in Jesus' exchange with the rich young ruler, and one was that He did not deny that He was the good teacher the ruler addressed Him as.  He simply tried to get the ruler to ask himself who he was calling good, and why.  In a way I see Jesus asking very gently and subtly asking "Do you really understand who you are talking to?"

Edited by Jostler
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2 minutes ago, pinacled said:

"Lay up your treasures in heaven'

"for where your heart is" 

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