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4 hours ago, Dennis1209 said:

I've noticed there's a number of military veterans here on Worthy. I thought it might be fun and interesting to share some military experiences and things that happened that are still in our memories. We will avoid all the gory stuff and things that we only talk with God about. Personally, I have so many memories I don't know where to start... 

At Travis Air Force Base in California I was about to board a Boeing 707 jet for my overseas deployment to Viet Nam. It was night time but the tarmac was well lit. Approaching the jet I looked at it and thought, "you gots to be kidding me". The paint on it was falling off all over the place, and aft of the engines, underneath the wings and both sides of the fuselage, was completely black from the jet exhaust. An airliner I had never heard of, Seaboard World; came back on another airline I never heard of, Tiger Airlines? I didn't have to worry about my tour, because I didn't think I was even going to make it there  :D

It was a very long flight and landed twice for fuel, total time from departure to arrival was about 28 hours. I couldn't sleep during the flight at all, all wound up in anticipation of the unknown. Rapidly descending the pilot announced we've entered Viet Nam airspace and will be landing in a few minutes. Looking out the window it appeared something was being shot up at us, I though, "Oh Boy", here we go... Later on I realized it was flares the military used to light up a combat zone; and they would become one of my favorite 'toys' to play with. As soon as we landed I was not thinking straight from lack of sleep and nervousness, then a thought suddenly occurred to me, IT'S MY BIRTHDAY, I'M 19 YEARS OLD". I left California on August 20th and this is the next day, the 21st. Then I thought... Is this yesterday or tomorrow where I'm at, did we cross the date line, did I miss my birthday, oh who cares, I have more to worry about than that anyway.

One of the very first things that happened after getting off the plane, we were given a bologna sack sandwich, one HUGE orange pill along with two great big chalky white horse pills and a half pint of orange juice to wash them down. We we never told what those pill were for until much later when we had to start talking those big white chalky white pills weekly [malaria pills]. Any pill hangs up in the back of my throat and I never took one again, I got lucky. 

 

My mother said that the aircraft carrying her and my two elder siblings was fired on when they arrived in Thailand during the late 1960's. The DoD had my family stay in a compound in Bangkok while my father was involved with Vietnam. I'm a Vietnam War baby myself (1969). 

Edited by DustyRoad
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Keep going with the war stories!:)  We thank you all from the bottom of our A5EC94C4-F887-4E53-A032-0823DA7D387B.gif.f08389ffa41256bc414f7f97bee63d0c.gifA5EC94C4-F887-4E53-A032-0823DA7D387B.gif.f08389ffa41256bc414f7f97bee63d0c.gifA5EC94C4-F887-4E53-A032-0823DA7D387B.gif.f08389ffa41256bc414f7f97bee63d0c.gifA5EC94C4-F887-4E53-A032-0823DA7D387B.gif.f08389ffa41256bc414f7f97bee63d0c.gifA5EC94C4-F887-4E53-A032-0823DA7D387B.gif.f08389ffa41256bc414f7f97bee63d0c.gifA5EC94C4-F887-4E53-A032-0823DA7D387B.gif.f08389ffa41256bc414f7f97bee63d0c.gif for your courage and service.  

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A typical day would start off by having to be at the Mess Hall by 4:00 A.M. to get our only hot meal of the day. We were issued two boxes of "C Rations" to sustain us for the rest of the day. I'm here to tell ya, if you've never ate any military C rations, you're lucky. 

I was stationed at a place called, Plantation, Viet Nam. I was a crew chief and M-60 machine gun door gunner on a UH-1C Huey assault helicopter, our platoon was called the "Sidewinders'. After breakfast we would have to walk down to the flight line and prepare the UH-1C assault gunship for its mission. Load the ammo for the mini guns and M-60 machine guns, load and insert the rockets and make sure we were ready to fire up when the pilots arrived to do their pre flight. I was a crew chief and M-60 door gunner. We would then lift off to our destination about an hours flight time to a place called Tay Ninh. This is where we waited to be called for aerial combat and support missions.

Long stretches of boredom were the norm waiting to be called upon. Well, everyone is getting hungry, so it's time to try and choke down some C rations [keep in mind I'm a newbie]. Those rations are extra nasty if you try to gag them down cold. There are many ways to heat these rations up, but the fastest and most efficient is the following. One of the pilots fires up the helicopter, and each in turn puts on his nomex gloves, grabs a pair of pliers and grabs the can by the lip, puts it directly behind the T53-L-13 turbine engine exhaust at flight idle, opens the can and starts gagging it down. Do you see where this is heading :D

Finally it's my turn and I do the same thing BUT; I like mine a little extra hot. Spent the next hour cleaning beanies & weenies off me and the aircraft. The military law of pressurized vessels and explosions surfaced its ugly head to wear food. When we got back that evening or late as night, depending on what involvement we had that day; our day was just beginning. If fired, all our weapons had to be cleaned and lubricated, preventive maintenance and oil samples / inspections performed. If we took any hits or damage, that had to be repaired or replaced immediately to return to service. 

Next chat: What M-60 machine gun fired brass does to a helicopter tail rotor from the left side.

P.S. The Tay Ninh International Air Port sign is a joke. The runway is only a thousand feet long and constructed of PSP.

 

Tay Ninh.jpg

117th Assault UH-1C.jpg

Edited by Dennis1209
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16 hours ago, Dennis1209 said:

I've noticed there's a number of military veterans here on Worthy. I thought it might be fun and interesting to share some military experiences and things that happened that are still in our memories. We will avoid all the gory stuff and things that we only talk with God about. Personally, I have so many memories I don't know where to start... 

At Travis Air Force Base in California I was about to board a Boeing 707 jet for my overseas deployment to Viet Nam. It was night time but the tarmac was well lit. Approaching the jet I looked at it and thought, "you gots to be kidding me". The paint on it was falling off all over the place, and aft of the engines, underneath the wings and both sides of the fuselage, was completely black from the jet exhaust. An airliner I had never heard of, Seaboard World; came back on another airline I never heard of, Tiger Airlines? I didn't have to worry about my tour, because I didn't think I was even going to make it there  :D

It was a very long flight and landed twice for fuel, total time from departure to arrival was about 28 hours. I couldn't sleep during the flight at all, all wound up in anticipation of the unknown. Rapidly descending the pilot announced we've entered Viet Nam airspace and will be landing in a few minutes. Looking out the window it appeared something was being shot up at us, I though, "Oh Boy", here we go... Later on I realized it was flares the military used to light up a combat zone; and they would become one of my favorite 'toys' to play with. As soon as we landed I was not thinking straight from lack of sleep and nervousness, then a thought suddenly occurred to me, IT'S MY BIRTHDAY, I'M 19 YEARS OLD". I left California on August 20th and this is the next day, the 21st. Then I thought... Is this yesterday or tomorrow where I'm at, did we cross the date line, did I miss my birthday, oh who cares, I have more to worry about than that anyway.

One of the very first things that happened after getting off the plane, we were given a bologna sack sandwich, one HUGE orange pill along with two great big chalky white horse pills and a half pint of orange juice to wash them down. We we never told what those pill were for until much later when we had to start talking those big white chalky white pills weekly [malaria pills]. Any pill hangs up in the back of my throat and I never took one again, I got lucky. 

 

I was in the Navy in those days.   We deployed to the Middle East twice, GITMO once and to South America once.   

While deployed along the coast of Africa heading back and forth to the Persian Gulf and Red Sea, we were issued the same orange pills you mentioned.   We also had to eat large salt tablets because of the oppressive desert heat.  When we had shore leave in parts of the Middle East we were told to avoid areas outside of certain cities that were occupied by Beduin folk.   They didn't care much for us 'unbelievers'.   I was enlisted in the Navy and found myself in the desert of Saudi Arabia doing guard duty with a member of the Saudi military.  Meanwhile a friend of mine enlisted in the Army and was assigned river boat duty in the Mekong Delta in Viet Nam.  Life is strange.

The Lord saved us from getting wacked by two, count 'em two, hurricanes while sailing home down the east coast of Africa toward the Cape of Good Hope.  As we sailed south, seas around us were mostly calm.  Everywhere else, both north and south of our track, was devastating storm and terrible seas.  It was so miraculous that our Captain, a declared atheist, admitted during an address to the crew that it nearly made him a believer in God.

I later learned that the man wasn't a career Navy man at all.  He was a CIA agent embedded in our command structure.  During our deployment to the Persian Gulf and western Indian Ocean he directed our ship and one other in an attempt to create an incident with the Russian Navy off the coast of Dijouti near the Horn of Africa.  This was attempted twice with both attempts failing.  I later learned the entire operation was being observed in a War Room in Japan.   I am very glad the Lord directed me to pray throughout the deployment for our safety.   To this day, I believe the operation failed because of Divine Providence.   Many good men would have died if it had succeeded as the waters at that time were infested with sharks and poisonous jelly fish so numerous you could almost walk to shore by stepping on their jelly-ish backs.

I am alive today along with many men because of the mercy and grace and direct intervention of God - in spite of the errant efforts of our own government to kill us all.   Praise God for His mercy.

that's me, hollering from the choir loft...

Edited by choir loft
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4 hours ago, Sonshine☀️ said:

Keep going with the war stories!:)  We thank you all from the bottom of our A5EC94C4-F887-4E53-A032-0823DA7D387B.gif.f08389ffa41256bc414f7f97bee63d0c.gifA5EC94C4-F887-4E53-A032-0823DA7D387B.gif.f08389ffa41256bc414f7f97bee63d0c.gifA5EC94C4-F887-4E53-A032-0823DA7D387B.gif.f08389ffa41256bc414f7f97bee63d0c.gifA5EC94C4-F887-4E53-A032-0823DA7D387B.gif.f08389ffa41256bc414f7f97bee63d0c.gifA5EC94C4-F887-4E53-A032-0823DA7D387B.gif.f08389ffa41256bc414f7f97bee63d0c.gifA5EC94C4-F887-4E53-A032-0823DA7D387B.gif.f08389ffa41256bc414f7f97bee63d0c.gif for your courage and service.  

I am the daughter of a war veteran, and I thank all of you for your service as well.

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I am sure some vets will happen on this post. I would like to thank all military guys for their service. I still have my Red Friday badge but folk seem to have forgotten...

To all military people, known and unknown along with the support services: THANK YOU ALL.

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