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Native Americans and Thanksgiving

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Native Americans and Thanksgiving

For Some a Time of Celebration, For Others a Time of Mourning

November 21, 2012|4:00 pm

Every Thanksgiving, while millions gather together with family, hundreds gather at a hill in Massachusetts.

Since 1970, Native Americans from across the United States assemble at noon on Thanksgiving Day at Cole's Hill, which overlooks Plymouth Rock, in order to observe a "National Day of Mourning."

With the rise of efforts by scholars and social commentators to focus on groups often ignored by conventional American history, there has been a growing focus on how Native Americans view the history of the United States and colonial America.

<snip>

"On Thanksgiving Day, while most Native people are sitting down to turkey dinners, some prefer to observe the day as one of mourning – for what happened to the millions of Indians who lived on the North and South American continents before the arrival of the Europeans," wrote Hill.

<snip>

Nevertheless, as noted by Hill for the National Museum's publication "Do All Indians Live in Tipis?", the Thanksgiving celebration is observed among most modern Native American communities.

An example of this would be the Cherokee Nation, which in 2001 posted on their official website a Thanksgiving Day prayer from a recently departed employee of the Nation.

"May the spirit of Thanksgiving be catching to those around me...may we give abundant thanks for the things we do have and certainly for some of the things we DO NOT have...and most of all – for my co-workers who have become my family...I thank God for each and everyone. HAPPY TURKEY DAY!!!," wrote the late Jan Morgan.

In the same year, the Cherokee Nation distributed educational material to over 100 elementary schools in Oklahoma regarding the "Indian Version of Thanksgiving." This included documenting the ways of giving thanks that Cherokee had been doing for centuries.

<snip>

Russell M. Peters, president of the Mashpee Wampanoag Indian Tribal Council, commented to the Pilgrim Hall Museum that the Day of Mourning has recently been overseen by a questionable group.

"While the `Day of Mourning' has served to focus attention on past injustice to the Native American cause, it has, in recent years, been orchestrated by a group calling themselves the United American Indians of New England," said Peters.

"This group has tenuous ties to any of the local tribes, and is composed primarily of non-Indians. To date, they have refused several invitations to meet with the Wampanoag Indian tribal councils in Mashpee or in Gay Head."

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Ive spent many thanksgivings with native americans who viewed it as we do and enjoy the feasting and family time. They thank God as we would.

This is telling

"This group has tenuous ties to any of the local tribes, and is composed primarily of non-Indians. To date, they have refused several invitations to meet with the Wampanoag Indian tribal councils in Mashpee or in Gay Head."

Sounds more like indian wannabees trying to get folks riled up rather than anything native americans truly think.

They just lost credibility with me here:

The 35th National Day of Mourning was held on Thursday, November 25, 2004, and was dedicated to Leonard Peltier, a Native American activist convicted and sentenced to two consecutive terms of life imprisonment for first degree murder in the shooting of two FBI agents.

It is a militant native american group that is no better than AIM. They favor violence and most native americans do not like them. Consider them the KKK of native americans.

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Read full article

Just in case anyone's interested. There's a virus in that link.

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Native Americans and Thanksgiving

For Some a Time of Celebration, For Others a Time of Mourning

November 21, 2012|4:00 pm

Every Thanksgiving, while millions gather together with family, hundreds gather at a hill in Massachusetts.

Since 1970, Native Americans from across the United States assemble at noon on Thanksgiving Day at Cole's Hill, which overlooks Plymouth Rock, in order to observe a "National Day of Mourning."

With the rise of efforts by scholars and social commentators to focus on groups often ignored by conventional American history, there has been a growing focus on how Native Americans view the history of the United States and colonial America.

<snip>

"On Thanksgiving Day, while most Native people are sitting down to turkey dinners, some prefer to observe the day as one of mourning – for what happened to the millions of Indians who lived on the North and South American continents before the arrival of the Europeans," wrote Hill.

<snip>

Nevertheless, as noted by Hill for the National Museum's publication "Do All Indians Live in Tipis?", the Thanksgiving celebration is observed among most modern Native American communities.

An example of this would be the Cherokee Nation, which in 2001 posted on their official website a Thanksgiving Day prayer from a recently departed employee of the Nation.

"May the spirit of Thanksgiving be catching to those around me...may we give abundant thanks for the things we do have and certainly for some of the things we DO NOT have...and most of all – for my co-workers who have become my family...I thank God for each and everyone. HAPPY TURKEY DAY!!!," wrote the late Jan Morgan.

In the same year, the Cherokee Nation distributed educational material to over 100 elementary schools in Oklahoma regarding the "Indian Version of Thanksgiving." This included documenting the ways of giving thanks that Cherokee had been doing for centuries.

<snip>

Russell M. Peters, president of the Mashpee Wampanoag Indian Tribal Council, commented to the Pilgrim Hall Museum that the Day of Mourning has recently been overseen by a questionable group.

"While the `Day of Mourning' has served to focus attention on past injustice to the Native American cause, it has, in recent years, been orchestrated by a group calling themselves the United American Indians of New England," said Peters.

"This group has tenuous ties to any of the local tribes, and is composed primarily of non-Indians. To date, they have refused several invitations to meet with the Wampanoag Indian tribal councils in Mashpee or in Gay Head."

Link deleted

Neb, I deleted the link because of mans comment and report that there seems to be a virus attached to the link. Can't be too careful, and I would run a virus scan if i were you, just to be on the safe side. (something called a Dragon Web Kit)

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Very odd. I do have a virus scanner on my computer.

The article is in The Christian Post.

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I have also disagreed about any virus on that site. Dragon is an application that translates spoken words into type. They have an add-on that enables web programming.

Here is what I found when checking it out with Norton.

christianpost.jpg

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WARNING!!!!!

Link has a problem.

11/22/2012 7:44 PM,High,An intrusion attempt by ver-adt.vindicosuite.com was blocked.,Blocked,No Action Required,Web Attack: Dragon Toolkit Activity,,"ver-adt.vindicosuite.com (50.112.247.68, 80)",ver-adt.vindicosuite.com/verify.js?

Dragon, is sending out code to get into your computer to see if that program is installed and is trying to access your computer. Norton is stopping it. The sourse is from Amazon Linux AMI Test Page

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Shep, do you mean the link to the main website?

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Shep, do you mean the link to the main website?

It seem to be the one that has the web page about thanksgiving, only...I was on the main site for about 5 minutes and got nothing but when I clicked on the article my Norton's when nuts.

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What article and where in the article are you clicking? The page itself was clean. It could be within the link

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