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Debp

New treatment for PTSD!

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thank you for shareing with us about this new treatment for PTSD :)  it does sound very interesting,  I know some people who have PTSD,  but it sounds like there's a lot of side effects with it though

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4 hours ago, simplejeff said:

Lots of things these days sound "prmisig".....  inclduind so-called "new" "cures" for cancer and hepatitis (which cures were known one hundred years ago,  at low cost and no toxicity) - now under pharmakeia very high cost .... 

The cure for the cancer I had was unknown 100 yrs ago. People just died back then. 

The survival rates of of cancers then were very poor. Even 50 yrs ago the survival rates were poor. The survival rates now are higher. So much higher that it is no longer a death sentence to get cancer.  People can be cured of cancer now.

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4 hours ago, Dennis1209 said:

This is just a personal observation as a military combat veteran and history buff. I don't have any statistics or studies to back it up, and I'm not implying anything whatsoever. My own experience with PTSD; and I would not call it that; was returning home from the stress of Vietnam and adjusting to the environment again. Any loud noise or sudden surprise would make me scramble and react; but those symptoms were defensive and left within days. 

I know PTSD is real, some are more prone than others to experience it. It appears to me as time passes, it's becoming much more prevalent since WW II. I'm sure you remember the George Patton incident slapping the private for cowardice, most likely what we call PTSD today. Anyway, I can't imagine the armies of; Joshua, Genghis Khan, the Roman Legions, Revolutionary War, Civil War, etc., having the ratio and percent of post traumatic stress syndrome that we see today. 

I'm basing my opinion on the number of military veterans committing suicide; and receiving disability pensions and treatment; compared to previously. As well as the unprecedented exponential increase in the general population of PTSD and its effects. This PTSD has been either hidden to history, or not noticed and recorded as such in such numbers. 

Anyone's thoughts???

Ptsd was not named until 1980s. Until then it was called other things like battle fatigue and shell shock. 

My father is a korean war vet. He has ptsd from it. He kept it well hidden and we didnt even know until he told us one day. 

It may seem like it is more prevelant today but I think that is because of increased awareness and the media reporting of it. I found an article on identifying ptsd in civil war vets.

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/ptsd-civil-wars-hidden-legacy-180953652/

 

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4 hours ago, Abby-Joy said:

I was diagnosed with PTSD last year. I was prescribed Ativan, which I only took twice and didn't like how it felt so I stopped taking it.  I was experiencing anxiety and panic attacks many times a day.  I was able to work through it without medication by taking slow deep breaths, praying, and reassuring myself that I was okay (in God's hands, etc). The frequency and duration began to become less and less. I finally was able to recognize when an attack was about to set in and begin the process on the front end and thwart the attack altogether. It hasn't been easy. I'm not saying I'll never experience that again. But I am leery of anything touted as a new wonder drug. It sounds good, but I wonder what the cost is....side effects???

Ptsd survivor here. 

I didnt take meds for it when I was first diagnosed nor do I take meds for it now. I avoid things as much as possible that can trigger a flare up in me, but sometimes a flare up happens. 

However the ptsd I suffer from is not remotely like the ptsd that the military suffers. 

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2 hours ago, ayin jade said:

Ptsd was not named until 1980s. Until then it was called other things like battle fatigue and shell shock. 

My father is a korean war vet. He has ptsd from it. He kept it well hidden and we didnt even know until he told us one day. 

It may seem like it is more prevelant today but I think that is because of increased awareness and the media reporting of it. I found an article on identifying ptsd in civil war vets.

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/ptsd-civil-wars-hidden-legacy-180953652/

 

Hi ayin jade,

I'm very aware of the change of terminology and definitions from "shell shock" and "battle fatigue", to PTSD in the military. As a general rule in my opinion only, PTSD resulted in prolonged and repeated exposure to threat of life, along with the hostile environment and continued stress. 

I can't count the number of documentaries and programs I've watched on TV where just one traumatic short term event resulted in life long PTSD, IE. a police officer involved in a shooting, a home invasion, an abused spouse, etc. I guess my point is: By any name it's called; I don't remember throughout my lifetime so much of the population developing PTSD. Then again, these days we have the rapid information technology and everyone is more aware of events and information as you mention.

One thing that has become apparent to me; got a problem? No problem, we make a pill for that too. I'm no medical expert, but it seems to me the money and concerted effort is going to medications that 'mask' the root cause, and not addressing the 'root cause'. I really don't need to address this because most already know, but I'll use my own deceased mother as an example. Mom was on a ton of medication, some of it was to counteract the effects of other drugs taken to mask the problem. Not a single drug was presented to address the root cause of the disease. Ever listen to the disclaimers during drug commercials of what can happen to a percentage of the population that take that particular drug? It's normally worse than what you already have. 

 

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I don’t claim to know what the answer is concerning the use of medications. I believe that the pharmaceutical industry has gone to the extreme in many cases, but I also believe that much good has come from it too. The one thing I do know is, that if they had not been available to me back in the 90’s when all of my issues came to a head, I would not be here today, because I would have become a statistic by my own hands. It wouldn’t been the right thing to do, but that is where my mind was at the time, and it sounded like the only reasonable thing to do. The medication I received at that time, worked to balance my thinking and calmed my anxieties. I might be sharing too much about myself, but I feel the need to when I see this issue discussed with little support for the good that medications can bring about in people’s lives. I know a host of other Veteran’s that would agree with me on this. And not only Veteran’s but rape victims, victims of violence, etc.

 

Gary

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8 hours ago, Sower said:

Illegal drugs cannot be taxed by the government, local or federal.

I'm anti drug, if at all possible. Many are life sustaining, and necessary, for some.
A good friend, Viet Nam vet, was on 17 drugs from the VA before he finally died.
Forty years after discharged.
A walking zombie. Can't fix em, medicate em.

 

One of the soldiers in the TV show I saw was prescribed a tremendous amount of drugs by the VA, no good results....then he tried this new treatment and got relief in one day!    He wished his friend who committed suicide could have known about the new treatment.

 

8 hours ago, bropro said:

 

Fifty plus years ago I spent a tour in Vietnam with 1st Battalion 4th Marines. Upon my return to the States, people noticed my exaggerated startle responses, mood swings, deep depression, emotional numbing and angry outbursts. I didn’t really connect this to my experiences in Vietnam at the time (I’m not very smart I guess you could say). I had never heard of PTSD at that time, but I think it was called something else such as, shell shot, battle fatigue, and possibly other things as well. I wish I could say that these were short term issues, but with me this is not the case. To this day, my friends and family, and the members at my church know not to come up behind me and tap me on the shoulder. I still battle with deep depression at times, especially around anniversary dates of the traumas I experienced. I have tried many of the latest medications throughout the years given to me by the VA, and they helped some, but only short term. The effects of these medications would drive me to quit taking them for a time, only to have to resume the regimen again in the future. So when I hear of new treatments coming out, I don’t really get my hopes up. They did not diagnose me with PTSD until 1996, when I wound up on the Psychiatric ward at the VA hospital with a complete mental breakdown for 3 weeks. As a Christian, I have been able to battle these things along with the tools and resources He has provided to those in the mental health field. I think I’ll stop here in order to keep this short, or maybe I’m too late for that.

Gary

Thank you for your service....my uncle served in Viet Nam, too.   Apparently the new treatment helps depression, too.   One soldier couldn't help smiling and his family noticed the good change in him, too.   The soldiers in the TV show said they didn't have side effects.

 

7 hours ago, shortangel said:

thank you for shareing with us about this new treatment for PTSD :) it does sound very interesting,  I know some people who have PTSD,  but it sounds like there's a lot of side effects with it though

I didn't read up on it but according to the soldiers in the TV program, they had no side effects.    They felt the treatment made them feel normal and able to respond to other help as well.

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1 hour ago, Debp said:

 

Thank you for your service....my uncle served in Viet Nam, too.   Apparently the new treatment helps depression, too.   One soldier couldn't help smiling and his family noticed the good change in him, too.   The soldiers in the TV show said they didn't have side effects.

 

 

I truly hope this new treatment is a huge success. There are a lot of guys out there that are needing help.  As for me, at this point in my life I am endeavoring to live drug free. But as I said in another post, these medications were what I needed at the time, and many others can attest to this. Thanks for posting this article and your concern for those suffering from PTSD.

 

Gary

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13 hours ago, Dennis1209 said:

This is just a personal observation as a military combat veteran and history buff. I don't have any statistics or studies to back it up, and I'm not implying anything whatsoever. My own experience with PTSD; and I would not call it that; was returning home from the stress of Vietnam and adjusting to the environment again. Any loud noise or sudden surprise would make me scramble and react; but those symptoms were defensive and left within days. 

I know PTSD is real, some are more prone than others to experience it. It appears to me as time passes, it's becoming much more prevalent since WW II. I'm sure you remember the George Patton incident slapping the private for cowardice, most likely what we call PTSD today. Anyway, I can't imagine the armies of; Joshua, Genghis Khan, the Roman Legions, Revolutionary War, Civil War, etc., having the ratio and percent of post traumatic stress syndrome that we see today. 

I'm basing my opinion on the number of military veterans committing suicide; and receiving disability pensions and treatment; compared to previously. As well as the unprecedented exponential increase in the general population of PTSD and its effects. This PTSD has been either hidden to history, or not noticed and recorded as such in such numbers. 

Anyone's thoughts???

 

A  VERY long time  ago, I think it was Vernon McGee who talked about the ancient Israeli armies had ways to deal with those men that were just cut out to be soldiers.Icant remember details, but it was handled in a way that there was no shame or disgrace involved.....it was dealt with matter- of- factly with no judgement meted out.

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15 minutes ago, Sower said:

Your story sounds similar to mine, and after two tours in the Nam, I returned home to a different world, landing in California
near LA.  Bobby Kennedy and Martin Luther King had been assassinated, bobby sock rockola
became psychedelic acid rock, everybody doing drugs openly, hippies, and the welcoming committee in California was less than cordial. Where's my parade?

I was too busy acclimatizing to start morbid introspecting. That was later. I do not recall having any social
problems, but I decided to live alone for awhile, and chill out.
Most old friends ask where I had been for so long. Yeah. Patriots all.
I realized I had become hyper vigilant. Totally non trusting. Especially those in control.
Like you Dennis, sudden loud noises took getting used to. I also was suspicious, and no trust.
No increased nightmares like other vets, probably some elevated anger issues, but I could
not 'bond' or relate on the same level to old friends, the stateside crowd. Still I didn't feel messed up.

I knew I could rehash memories, but again, I was trying to fit in, lose the military walk/talk, let the hair grow
learn the new lingo, and find a job. My dad, uncles, grandfather and great grandfather all served in the military.
They got through it without whining, so could I.

I saw my share of death. But I don't believe I was seriously traumatized. I equate this like;   two guys go to Nam, one was from the hood in Detroit, member of a gang, sister strung out on drugs, brother killed in a drive by,  dad in prison, shootings heard most nights.  Other guy is from a farm in Iowa, in the choir at church, and close loving family, and the worst trauma he saw was a breach birth of a calf.
They both are in the same unit, both go through the same exposure to chaos, death and destruction, and both make it back to the world.
One was ready for it, one was severely traumatized.
Many old salts have experienced WWII, Korea, and Viet Nam, and still maintained a
normal human dignity. They could deal with it. Some don't/can't.
As a platoon Sgt, I was responsible for my marines. I became controlling, hard, made all decisions, and hyper vigilant.
This carried over into my life, my marriage, family, and friends. Some a little, some a lot.
As a then Christian, knowing I was out of control, alienating  my family, I tried professional help. All I learned was the 'mind' doctors make big bucks.
Through a church buddy, I found a spirit lead Christian counselor, and after about a year of counseling, , I woke up.
It was like being born again, mentally. With my wife and myself together and the counselor asking each
questions and me listening to my wife's answer's, I saw the real me. I also realized as a believer, I was now a new creature, and old things had passed away.
I may not have been traumatized, but I had constructed a sort of protective shell around me from getting close to others.
Still working on that. Having all those grand kids close at hand really helps. So does Worthy, and my sisters and brothers here.

The new mobile(choppers) air soldiers, and amphibious troop movement, starting in Viet Nam, and then all the combat in Iraq etc, the modern soldiers see more combat in a month than WWII saw in a year or more. With new advanced mobile medical treatment,  wounded can be back in action more quickly. Many now live in air conditioned units with electricity, internet, phones calling home, work out gyms, cafeterias, etc.  Flown out and dropped off or driven, deploy, execute, return.  Over and over and over. Extreme tension, heart rate, vigilance,  senses, fears, trauma, wounded or dead buddies, med a vacs, hospitals, a daily routine. Return to base, and  call home and talk to wife and kids. Modern war. Mind boggling.  (I was fortunate.)
The VA pushes me and all the vets I know to sign up for a claim. "The money has been set aside for us, I'm told."  Veterans I know say I'm a fool for not getting whats due me.
(I do not. My God has always taken extremely great care of me and my family:) I also believe it's pretty obvious people are affected having seen combat in war. I also believe there is a push to sign up as many as possible for all the VA can do for vets. In this rush to redeem themselves from past shameful history in the treatment of our brothers in arms, they are trying to make up for it. I have met vets with 100% disability, that looked like Schwarzenegger, and other friends also with two retirements coming in, and major claims from the VA.
Combat vets deserve the best care available from those whom they lay their lives down for. For sure. But there are many others simply jumping on the band wagon. Cuz they can.

Sorry Dennis, not too succinct?............default_cool2.gif.8a21ebf26a9e79d2a2ae956f6688fb95.gif

Gary/Sower
'In Him Who is
Semper Fidelis'

 

 

Thank you for your service and your sacrifices.You would be adverse to saying it, but you are a hero. God bless you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

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