Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
George

Abraham and Issac: Pictures of the Resurrection, Part 2

Recommended Posts

Shalom everyone,

As we continue this series the next obvious sign of the resurrection in the Old Testament is the sign of Isaac and Abraham.

Gen 22:1  After these things God tested Abraham and said to him, "Abraham!" And he said, "Here I am."
Gen 22:2  He said, "Take your son, your only son Isaac, whom you love, and go to the land of Moriah, and offer him there as a burnt offering on one of the mountains of which I shall tell you."

So God "tests" Abraham and as a perfect picture of the coming sacrifice of God's only begotten Son (Yeshua - Jesus) God instructs Issac to go and sacrifice his son, Issac.  Where does he say to offer him?  On Moriah -- the exact location of the Temple Mount.

Gen 22:3  So Abraham rose early in the morning, saddled his donkey, and took two of his young men with him, and his son Isaac. And he cut the wood for the burnt offering and arose and went to the place of which God had told him.

Notice Abraham didn't waste any time -- he left the next morning!  And arrived on a donkey -- just as Yeshua triumphantly entered Jerusalem on a donkey!

Gen 22:4  On the third day Abraham lifted up his eyes and saw the place from afar.

You'll notice over and over again the number 3 in connection to the resurrection throughout the Old Covenant.

Gen 22:5  Then Abraham said to his young men, "Stay here with the donkey; I and the boy will go over there and worship and come again to you."

At this point, we get an understanding that Abraham knew something -- he wasn't sure about the test -- but he did expect to RETURN with Issac.

Heb 11:17  By faith Abraham, when he was tested, offered up Isaac, and he who had received the promises was in the act of offering up his only son,
Heb 11:18  of whom it was said, "Through Isaac shall your offspring be named."
Heb 11:19  He considered that God was able even to raise him from the dead, from which, figuratively speaking, he did receive him back.

Abraham wasn't sure what God was going to do -- but He "considered" even at this point the -- RESURRECTION!

Gen 22:6  And Abraham took the wood of the burnt offering and laid it on Isaac his son. And he took in his hand the fire and the knife. So they went both of them together.

This is a perfect picture of the cross that Yeshua would carry before his crucifixion.

Gen 22:7  And Isaac said to his father Abraham, "My father!" And he said, "Here I am, my son." He said, "Behold, the fire and the wood, but where is the lamb for a burnt offering?"
Gen 22:8  Abraham said, "God will provide for himself the lamb for a burnt offering, my son." So they went both of them together.

So even here, God would provide the Lamb for himself -- just as the Lamb of God was provided for the world.

Gen 22:9  When they came to the place of which God had told him, Abraham built the altar there and laid the wood in order and bound Isaac his son and laid him on the altar, on top of the wood.

This is the Hebrew understanding of "Akeda" which is the "binding of Isaac" and its root comes from the Hebrew word, akod, which meant -- bound but it literally means "ringed" or "striped".  One of the ancient scholars of Israel, Rashi, explained the use of the verb as "stripe-like marks" left by ropes on the ankles and wrists of a person who is tied hand and foot.  Thus the reason for the word "akeda" for the naming of the story is named after the marks that were left on Issac's body!   A perfect picture of the fact that Yeshua still had marks even after his resurrection.  As Thomas only believed after reaching his hands into his side -- and his wrists -- a perfect picture even to the Hebraic understanding of word -- akeda.  As Issac was laid on the wood -- so Yeshua was laid on the cross.

Gen 22:10  Then Abraham reached out his hand and took the knife to slaughter his son.
Gen 22:11  But the angel of the LORD called to him from heaven and said, "Abraham, Abraham!" And he said, "Here I am."
Gen 22:12  He said, "Do not lay your hand on the boy or do anything to him, for now I know that you fear God, seeing you have not withheld your son, your only son, from me."
Gen 22:13  And Abraham lifted up his eyes and looked, and behold, behind him was a ram, caught in a thicket by his horns. And Abraham went and took the ram and offered it up as a burnt offering instead of his son.
Gen 22:14  So Abraham called the name of that place, "The LORD will provide"; as it is said to this day, "On the mount of the LORD it shall be provided."

Issac by this age was strong enough to fight off his father Abraham who was well into his age -- yet Issac was willing to lay down his life -- just as Yeshua was willing to lay His life down for His Father.  Even the exact location of the sacrifice would be known years later as the PLACE where the Lord would provide His Son as the "lamb of God" for the sins of the world!

Gen 22:15  And the angel of the LORD called to Abraham a second time from heaven
Gen 22:16  and said, "By myself I have sworn, declares the LORD, because you have done this and have not withheld your son, your only son,
Gen 22:17  I will surely bless you, and I will surely multiply your offspring as the stars of heaven and as the sand that is on the seashore. And your offspring shall possess the gate of his enemies,
Gen 22:18  and in your offspring shall all the nations of the earth be blessed, because you have obeyed my voice."

The sacrifice of Issac was connected to the blessings of the nations -- and years later the sacrifice of Yeshua -- is the blessing to the nations!

I'm sure there are more comparisons, but this summarizes the story of Abraham and Issac and the connection to the Resurrection,

Your brother in the Lord with much agape love,

George

  • Thumbs Up 1
  • This is Worthy 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I always see the story at bar as a picture that no man even if he is perfect and inosent and perhaps without sin like Isaak could be a sacrificial lam to die for someone so as to give back the life of God to man if he didn't have the life of God, not only to be born with, but still havin it at the time of his sacrifice( I try to show why John the Baptis could not be the Christ)

He must also not be an earthly one - he must be

heavenly so he can return to the heavens.

Now I see God who, got back his son (after his sacrifies)(like in Abraham) and I see the blessing of descentas came right after the sacrifices( just like in Abraham) and how can he have discentans,unless he comes back to life(just like Isaak.)

Thank you for the post.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Shalom everyone,

 

As we continue this series the next obvious sign of the resurrection in the Old Testament is the sign of Isaac and Abraham.

 

Gen 22:1  After these things God tested Abraham and said to him, "Abraham!" And he said, "Here I am."

Gen 22:2  He said, "Take your son, your only son Isaac, whom you love, and go to the land of Moriah, and offer him there as a burnt offering on one of the mountains of which I shall tell you."

 

So God "tests" Abraham and as a perfect picture of the coming sacrifice of God's only begotten Son (Yeshua - Jesus) God instructs Issac to go and sacrifice his son, Issac.  Where does he say to offer him?  On Moriah -- the exact location of the Temple Mount.

 

Gen 22:3  So Abraham rose early in the morning, saddled his donkey, and took two of his young men with him, and his son Isaac. And he cut the wood for the burnt offering and arose and went to the place of which God had told him.

 

Notice Abraham didn't waste any time -- he left the next morning!  And arrived on a donkey -- just as Yeshua triumphantly entered Jerusalem on a donkey!

Gen 22:4  On the third day Abraham lifted up his eyes and saw the place from afar.

 

You'll notice over and over again the number 3 in connection to the resurrection throughout the Old Covenant.

 

Gen 22:5  Then Abraham said to his young men, "Stay here with the donkey; I and the boy will go over there and worship and come again to you."

 

At this point, we get an understanding that Abraham knew something -- he wasn't sure about the test -- but he did expect to RETURN with Issac.

 

Heb 11:17  By faith Abraham, when he was tested, offered up Isaac, and he who had received the promises was in the act of offering up his only son,

Heb 11:18  of whom it was said, "Through Isaac shall your offspring be named."

Heb 11:19  He considered that God was able even to raise him from the dead, from which, figuratively speaking, he did receive him back.

 

Abraham wasn't sure what God was going to do -- but He "considered" even at this point the -- RESURRECTION!

 

Gen 22:6  And Abraham took the wood of the burnt offering and laid it on Isaac his son. And he took in his hand the fire and the knife. So they went both of them together.

 

This is a perfect picture of the cross that Yeshua would carry before his crucifixion.

Gen 22:7  And Isaac said to his father Abraham, "My father!" And he said, "Here I am, my son." He said, "Behold, the fire and the wood, but where is the lamb for a burnt offering?"

Gen 22:8  Abraham said, "God will provide for himself the lamb for a burnt offering, my son." So they went both of them together.

 

So even here, God would provide the Lamb for himself -- just as the Lamb of God was provided for the world.

 

Gen 22:9  When they came to the place of which God had told him, Abraham built the altar there and laid the wood in order and bound Isaac his son and laid him on the altar, on top of the wood.

This is the Hebrew understanding of "Akeda" which is the "binding of Isaac" and its root comes from the Hebrew word, akod, which meant -- bound but it literally means "ringed" or "striped".  One of the ancient scholars of Israel, Rashi, explained the use of the verb as "stripe-like marks" left by ropes on the ankles and wrists of a person who is tied hand and foot.  Thus the reason for the word "akeda" for the naming of the story is named after the marks that were left on Issac's body!   A perfect picture of the fact that Yeshua still had marks even after his resurrection.  As Thomas only believed after reaching his hands into his side -- and his wrists -- a perfect picture even to the Hebraic understanding of word -- akeda.  As Issac was laid on the wood -- so Yeshua was laid on the cross.

 

Gen 22:10  Then Abraham reached out his hand and took the knife to slaughter his son.

Gen 22:11  But the angel of the LORD called to him from heaven and said, "Abraham, Abraham!" And he said, "Here I am."

Gen 22:12  He said, "Do not lay your hand on the boy or do anything to him, for now I know that you fear God, seeing you have not withheld your son, your only son, from me."

Gen 22:13  And Abraham lifted up his eyes and looked, and behold, behind him was a ram, caught in a thicket by his horns. And Abraham went and took the ram and offered it up as a burnt offering instead of his son.

Gen 22:14  So Abraham called the name of that place, "The LORD will provide"; as it is said to this day, "On the mount of the LORD it shall be provided."

 

Issac by this age was strong enough to fight off his father Abraham who was well into his age -- yet Issac was willing to lay down his life -- just as Yeshua was willing to lay His life down for His Father.  Even the exact location of the sacrifice would be known years later as the PLACE where the Lord would provide His Son as the "lamb of God" for the sins of the world!

 

Gen 22:15  And the angel of the LORD called to Abraham a second time from heaven

Gen 22:16  and said, "By myself I have sworn, declares the LORD, because you have done this and have not withheld your son, your only son,

Gen 22:17  I will surely bless you, and I will surely multiply your offspring as the stars of heaven and as the sand that is on the seashore. And your offspring shall possess the gate of his enemies,

Gen 22:18  and in your offspring shall all the nations of the earth be blessed, because you have obeyed my voice."

 

The sacrifice of Issac was connected to the blessings of the nations -- and years later the sacrifice of Yeshua -- is the blessing to the nations!

 

I'm sure there's more comparisons, but this summarizes the story of Abraham and Issac and the connection to the Resurrection,

 

Your brother in the Lord with much agape love,

 

George

Amen..!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm sure there's more comparisons, but this summarizes the story of Abraham and Issac and the connection to the Resurrection,..

We should not forget that after his "resurrection" Isaac received his bride Rebekah, just as Christ will receive His Bride -- the Church -- at the Rapture, following which the Bride will become the Lamb's Wife.  The typology of how Isaac receives his bride is also quite instructive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Ezra,

 

Just a point there - An Israelite had to marry a woman from the nation of Israel, not a gentile.

 

Marilyn.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Ezra,

 

Just a point there - An Israelite had to marry a woman from the nation of Israel, not a gentile.

 

Marilyn.

Marilyn,

 

Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob were Hebrews.  The Israelites descended from Jacob (Israel).  So there were no "Israelites" in this context. How did you miss that?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Ezra,

 

How indeed could I have missed that.  :madgrin:    Well there you are - human I am. However the point still stands as  Abraham said -

 

`So Abraham said to the oldest servant of his house, who ruled over all that he had, "Please, put your hand under my thigh, & I will make you swear by the Lord, the God of heaven & the God of the earth, that you will not take a wife for my son from the daughters of the Canaanites, among who, I dwell; but you shall go to my country, & to MY KINDRED, & take a wife for my son Isaac." (Gen. 24: 2 - 4)

 

Hope that helps, Marilyn. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The idea of a Jewish husband marrying a "gentile" wife and being grafted in is best understood in the life of Joseph.  As his wife was an Egyptian -- and her two sons -- Ephraim and Manasseh were given their portion of the promised land!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Ezra,

 

How indeed could I have missed that.  :madgrin:    Well there you are - human I am. However the point still stands as  Abraham said -

 

`So Abraham said to the oldest servant of his house, who ruled over all that he had, "Please, put your hand under my thigh, & I will make you swear by the Lord, the God of heaven & the God of the earth, that you will not take a wife for my son from the daughters of the Canaanites, among who, I dwell; but you shall go to my country, & to MY KINDRED, & take a wife for my son Isaac." (Gen. 24: 2 - 4)

 

Hope that helps, Marilyn. 

It was a matter of degree. While the Canaanites were utterly corrupt, Laban and Rachel were also idolaters (Gen 31:19-37), and Laban cheated Jacob out of his just wages (not that Jacob had not cheated his brother, but that's another issue).  So Rebekah's family (close relatives of Abraham)  were anomalous, and that is why Abraham came out of Mesopotamia in the first place. He was commanded to leave this family and go to Canaan (Gen 12:1).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I see this story of Abe and Isaac to be more a testing of Abe's faith. Without faith, believing God, there would have been no actions. His actions demonstrated his belief. They revealed his heart to himself, since God already knew his heart. But the whole scenerio was a prophecy, as you have aptly put. It was a foreshadowing of the coming Messiah. It was yet another way in which Jesus fulfilled the Torah, the Law.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

×