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Wormwood

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#1
bopeep1909

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Revelation 8:10-11 10 Then the third angel sounded: And a great star fell from heaven, burning like a torch, and it fell on a third of the rivers and on the springs of water. 11 The name of the star is Wormwood. A third of the waters became wormwood, and many men died from the water, because it was made bitter.

What do you think this will be?What does Wormwood mean?I wonder if there is really a star named "wormwood" that scientists are aware of now or will it be discovered and named during the tribulation?


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#2
fire-heart

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Revelation 8:10-11 10 Then the third angel sounded: And a great star fell from heaven, burning like a torch, and it fell on a third of the rivers and on the springs of water. 11 The name of the star is Wormwood. A third of the waters became wormwood, and many men died from the water, because it was made bitter.

What do you think this will be?What does Wormwood mean?

Wormwood means bitter its a root used as medicine but is extremely bitter. Wormwood will most likeliy be a comet or astriod but will be a very larg one.


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#3
OakWood

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Many years ago before I was a believer (but still a little superstitious with regards to the Bible, like so many false, semi-believing and lapsed Christians are), I heard it said that the Ukrainian word for Wormwood was Chernobyl, so I thought that it may have been a reference to the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. This was without reading it or taking it in context with other verses, of course.

Now of course, I realise that none of that makes any sense, so I've stayed away from the 'wormwood' question. I just don't know what it means. I expect it will come clearer nearer to the time.


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bopeep1909

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Many years ago before I was a believer (but still a little superstitious with regards to the Bible, like so many false, semi-believing and lapsed Christians are), I heard it said that the Ukrainian word for Wormwood was Chernobyl, so I thought that it may have been a reference to the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. This was without reading it or taking it in context with other verses, of course.

Now of course, I realise that none of that makes any sense, so I've stayed away from the 'wormwood' question. I just don't know what it means. I expect it will come clearer nearer to the time.

Maybe a meteor that the news is always talking about ? I guess time will tell.


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ayin jade

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Maybe a meteor will crash into chernobyl and give the wormwood name to it from that? One can speculate quite a bit with revelation.


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#6
bopeep1909

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Maybe a meteor will crash into chernobyl and give the wormwood name to it from that? One can speculate quite a bit with revelation.

Hmmm...the Bible says it is supposed to fall into 1/3 of our rivers and make them bitter so I can speculate not.


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#7
lsundal

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Irving Baxter is promoting his theory of Wormwood/Chernobyl on his show "End Times"
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#8
other one

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burning star falling like a torch and falling over a large area....    sounds like a small asteroid or very large meteor breaking up in the atmosphere and the residue falling over a very large area.


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#9
Ezra

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Revelation 8:10-11 10 Then the third angel sounded: And a great star fell from heaven, burning like a torch, and it fell on a third of the rivers and on the springs of water. 11 The name of the star is Wormwood. A third of the waters became wormwood, and many men died from the water, because it was made bitter.

What do you think this will be?What does Wormwood mean?I wonder if there is really a star named "wormwood" that scientists are aware of now or will it be discovered and named during the tribulation?

It would be pure speculation to try and determine what Wormwood will or will not be, other than what is written viz. it is a burning star which makes water bitter and poisons it so that human beings die.  Since one-third of all the earth's water supply will be affected, it will be an extremely serious catastrophe.

 

More importantly, those who are not saved should hear about Wormwood and all the other catastrophic judgments which will come upon the earth. Today is the day of salvation, but it is also included in "the beginning of sorrows". 

 

What sinners need to hear is that Christ tasted the "wormwood and the gall" on their behalf on the Cross (Lamentations 3:19).  No man will ever know the magnitude of His suffereings in order to provide redemption to all who will believe.


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#10
bopeep1909

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burning star falling like a torch and falling over a large area....    sounds like a small asteroid or very large meteor breaking up in the atmosphere and the residue falling over a very large area.

That is what I think oo a large meteor.There have already been a few that have slipped by our earth.Someday it will hit and be devastating.That is my thought anyway.


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#11
Retrobyter

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Shalom, bopeep1909.

 

Revelation 8:10-11 10 Then the third angel sounded: And a great star fell from heaven, burning like a torch, and it fell on a third of the rivers and on the springs of water. 11 The name of the star is Wormwood. A third of the waters became wormwood, and many men died from the water, because it was made bitter.

What do you think this will be?What does Wormwood mean?I wonder if there is really a star named "wormwood" that scientists are aware of now or will it be discovered and named during the tribulation?

 

It is truly amazing to me (and disconcerting) that NO ONE checked the Greek text of this passage! The Greek word translated as “Wormwood” was “Apsinthos.” There is a liquor that was named with this Greek word: absinthe.

 

Here’s Wikipedia on the subject:

 

Absinthe (11px-Speakerlink-new.svg.pngi/ˈæbsɪnθ/ or /ˈæbsænθ/; French: [apsɛ̃t]) is historically described as a distilled, highly alcoholic (45–74% ABV / 90–148 U.S. proof) beverage. It is an anise-flavoured spirit derived from botanicals, including the flowers and leaves of Artemisia absinthium ("grand wormwood"), together with green anise, sweet fennel, and other medicinal and culinary herbs. Absinthe traditionally has a natural green colour but may also be colourless. It is commonly referred to in historical literature as "la fée verte" (the green fairy). Although it is sometimes mistakenly referred to as a liqueur, absinthe is not traditionally bottled with added sugar; it is therefore classified as a spirit. Absinthe is traditionally bottled at a high level of alcohol by volume, but it is normally diluted with water prior to being consumed.

Absinthe originated in the canton of Neuchâtel in Switzerland in the late 18th century. It rose to great popularity as an alcoholic drink in late 19th- and early 20th-century France, particularly among Parisian artists and writers. Owing in part to its association with bohemian culture, the consumption of absinthe was opposed by social conservatives and prohibitionistsErnest HemingwayJames JoyceCharles BaudelairePaul VerlaineArthur RimbaudHenri de Toulouse-LautrecAmedeo ModiglianiPablo PicassoVincent van GoghOscar WildeAleister CrowleyErik Satie and Alfred Jarry were all known absinthe drinkers.

 

Absinthe has often been portrayed as a dangerously addictive psychoactive drug and hallucinogen. The chemical compound thujone, although present in the spirit in only trace amounts, was blamed for its alleged harmful effects. By 1915, absinthe had been banned in the United States and in much of Europe, including France, the NetherlandsBelgiumSwitzerland and Austria-Hungary. Although absinthe was vilified, it has not been demonstrated to be any more dangerous than ordinary spirits. Recent studies have shown that absinthe's psychoactive properties (apart from that of the alcohol) have been exaggerated. A revival of absinthe began in the 1990s, following the adoption of modern European Union food and beverage laws that removed longstanding barriers to its production and sale. By the early 21st century, nearly 200 brands of absinthe were being produced in a dozen countries, most notably in France, Switzerland, Australia, United States, Spain, and the Czech Republic.

 

Here’s some of what Wikipedia has to say about its etymology:

 

The French word absinthe can refer either to the alcoholic beverage or, less commonly, to the actual wormwood plant, with grande absinthe being Artemisia absinthium, and petite absinthe being Artemisia pontica. The Latin name artemisia comes from Artemis, the ancient Greek goddess of the hunt. Absinthe is derived from the Latin absinthium, which in turn comes from the ancient Greek ἀψίνθιον apsínthion, "wormwood". The use of Artemisia absinthium in a drink is attested in LucretiusDe Rerum Natura (I 936–950), where Lucretius indicates that a drink containing wormwood is given as medicine to children in a cup with honey on the brim to make it drinkable.

Some claim that the word means "undrinkable" in Greek, but it may instead be linked to the Persian root spand or aspand, or the variant esfand, which meant Peganum harmala, also called Syrian Rue—although it is not actually a variety of rue, another famously bitter herb. That Artemisia absinthium was commonly burned as a protective offering may suggest that its origins lie in the reconstructed Proto-Indo-European root *spend, meaning "to perform a ritual" or "make an offering". Whether the word was a borrowing from Persian into Greek, or from a common ancestor of both, is unclear. Alternatively, the Greek word may originate in a pre-Greek Pelasgian word, marked by the non-Indo-European consonant complex νθ.

Alternative spellings for absinthe include absinth, absynthe and absenta. Absinth (without the final e) is a spelling variant most commonly applied to absinthes produced in central and eastern Europe, and is specifically associated with Bohemian-style absinthes.

 

Thus, I believe that this “star” (a sputtering meteor that contaminates the drinking water over which it flies) will drop the chemical make-up of this drink or the plant upon these waters, hence the name.


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#12
bopeep1909

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Shalom, bopeep1909.

 

Revelation 8:10-11 10 Then the third angel sounded: And a great star fell from heaven, burning like a torch, and it fell on a third of the rivers and on the springs of water. 11 The name of the star is Wormwood. A third of the waters became wormwood, and many men died from the water, because it was made bitter.

What do you think this will be?What does Wormwood mean?I wonder if there is really a star named "wormwood" that scientists are aware of now or will it be discovered and named during the tribulation?

 

It is truly amazing to me (and disconcerting) that NO ONE checked the Greek text of this passage! The Greek word translated as “Wormwood” was “Apsinthos.” There is a liquor that was named with this Greek word: absinthe.

 

Here’s Wikipedia on the subject:

 

Absinthe (11px-Speakerlink-new.svg.pngi/ˈæbsɪnθ/ or /ˈæbsænθ/; French: [apsɛ̃t]) is historically described as a distilled, highly alcoholic (45–74% ABV / 90–148 U.S. proof) beverage. It is an anise-flavoured spirit derived from botanicals, including the flowers and leaves of Artemisia absinthium ("grand wormwood"), together with green anise, sweet fennel, and other medicinal and culinary herbs. Absinthe traditionally has a natural green colour but may also be colourless. It is commonly referred to in historical literature as "la fée verte" (the green fairy). Although it is sometimes mistakenly referred to as a liqueur, absinthe is not traditionally bottled with added sugar; it is therefore classified as a spirit. Absinthe is traditionally bottled at a high level of alcohol by volume, but it is normally diluted with water prior to being consumed.

Absinthe originated in the canton of Neuchâtel in Switzerland in the late 18th century. It rose to great popularity as an alcoholic drink in late 19th- and early 20th-century France, particularly among Parisian artists and writers. Owing in part to its association with bohemian culture, the consumption of absinthe was opposed by social conservatives and prohibitionistsErnest HemingwayJames JoyceCharles BaudelairePaul VerlaineArthur RimbaudHenri de Toulouse-LautrecAmedeo ModiglianiPablo PicassoVincent van GoghOscar WildeAleister CrowleyErik Satie and Alfred Jarry were all known absinthe drinkers.

 

Absinthe has often been portrayed as a dangerously addictive psychoactive drug and hallucinogen. The chemical compound thujone, although present in the spirit in only trace amounts, was blamed for its alleged harmful effects. By 1915, absinthe had been banned in the United States and in much of Europe, including France, the NetherlandsBelgiumSwitzerland and Austria-Hungary. Although absinthe was vilified, it has not been demonstrated to be any more dangerous than ordinary spirits. Recent studies have shown that absinthe's psychoactive properties (apart from that of the alcohol) have been exaggerated. A revival of absinthe began in the 1990s, following the adoption of modern European Union food and beverage laws that removed longstanding barriers to its production and sale. By the early 21st century, nearly 200 brands of absinthe were being produced in a dozen countries, most notably in France, Switzerland, Australia, United States, Spain, and the Czech Republic.

 

Here’s some of what Wikipedia has to say about its etymology:

 

The French word absinthe can refer either to the alcoholic beverage or, less commonly, to the actual wormwood plant, with grande absinthe being Artemisia absinthium, and petite absinthe being Artemisia pontica. The Latin name artemisia comes from Artemis, the ancient Greek goddess of the hunt. Absinthe is derived from the Latin absinthium, which in turn comes from the ancient Greek ἀψίνθιον apsínthion, "wormwood". The use of Artemisia absinthium in a drink is attested in LucretiusDe Rerum Natura (I 936–950), where Lucretius indicates that a drink containing wormwood is given as medicine to children in a cup with honey on the brim to make it drinkable.

Some claim that the word means "undrinkable" in Greek, but it may instead be linked to the Persian root spand or aspand, or the variant esfand, which meant Peganum harmala, also called Syrian Rue—although it is not actually a variety of rue, another famously bitter herb. That Artemisia absinthium was commonly burned as a protective offering may suggest that its origins lie in the reconstructed Proto-Indo-European root *spend, meaning "to perform a ritual" or "make an offering". Whether the word was a borrowing from Persian into Greek, or from a common ancestor of both, is unclear. Alternatively, the Greek word may originate in a pre-Greek Pelasgian word, marked by the non-Indo-European consonant complex νθ.

Alternative spellings for absinthe include absinth, absynthe and absenta. Absinth (without the final e) is a spelling variant most commonly applied to absinthes produced in central and eastern Europe, and is specifically associated with Bohemian-style absinthes.

 

Thus, I believe that this “star” (a sputtering meteor that contaminates the drinking water over which it flies) will drop the chemical make-up of this drink or the plant upon these waters, hence the name.

Thanks that is interesting  :mgcheerful: .


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